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  • Lag-Time to Publication in Plastic Surgery Potential Impact on the Timely Practice of Evidence-Based Medicine 18th Annual Meeting of the American-Society-for-Reconstructive-Microsurgery Lee, D. T., Lacombe, J., Chung, C. K., Kattan, A., Lee, G. K. LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS. 2013: 410?14
  • Microsurgical Head and Neck Reconstruction After Oncologic Ablation A Study Analyzing Health-Related Quality of Life ANNALS OF PLASTIC SURGERY Momeni, A., Kim, R. Y., Kattan, A., Lee, G. K. 2013; 70 (4): 462-469

    Abstract

    BACKGROUND: Evaluation of quality of life (QOL) measures is increasingly being valued as an essential parameter to determine treatment results after head and neck reconstruction. The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of microsurgical reconstruction on patient-reported QOL. METHODS: Patients undergoing microsurgical reconstruction after radical oncosurgical ablation of head and neck malignancies from March 2007 to March 2010 were included in the study. To assess health-related QOL, the following questionnaires were sent to patients who met inclusion criteria: European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Core Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-C30 [Version 3.0]) and Head and Neck Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-H and N35). RESULTS: A total of 60 patients underwent microsurgical reconstruction of postablative head and neck defects during the study period. Twenty-one patients were successfully contacted, all of which completed the surveys. Satisfactory global QOL scores were achieved. Advanced age correlated with greater impairment for the ability to taste and smell (P = 0.05). Radiotherapy seemed to be associated with "sticky saliva"; although this was not statistically significant (P = 0.06). Recurrent disease at the time of surgical ablation and microsurgical reconstruction did not seem to have any appreciable impact on QOL. Finally, patients who developed postoperative complications had lower levels of "cognitive functioning" (P = 0.04), problems with "insomnia" (P = 0.04) and "social contact" (P = 0.03), and more commonly "felt ill" (P = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: Improved global QOL scores were observed after microsurgical reconstruction of various head and neck defects when compared to reported pretreatment scores. Of the parameters analyzed, it seems that postoperative complications have the most profound effect on items assessed with the EORTC QLQ-C30 and H and N35 surveys. Our findings provide further scientific evidence that patients with head and neck malignancy benefit from surgical intervention with respect to postoperative QOL.

    View details for DOI 10.1097/SAP.0b013e31827737a5

    View details for Web of Science ID 000316603400020

  • Microsurgical Head and Neck Reconstruction After Oncologic Ablation: A Study Analyzing Health-Related Quality of Life. Annals of plastic surgery Momeni, A., Kim, R. Y., Kattan, A., Lee, G. K. 2013

    Abstract

    BACKGROUND: Evaluation of quality of life (QOL) measures is increasingly being valued as an essential parameter to determine treatment results after head and neck reconstruction. The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of microsurgical reconstruction on patient-reported QOL. METHODS: Patients undergoing microsurgical reconstruction after radical oncosurgical ablation of head and neck malignancies from March 2007 to March 2010 were included in the study. To assess health-related QOL, the following questionnaires were sent to patients who met inclusion criteria: European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Core Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-C30 [Version 3.0]) and Head and Neck Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-H and N35). RESULTS: A total of 60 patients underwent microsurgical reconstruction of postablative head and neck defects during the study period. Twenty-one patients were successfully contacted, all of which completed the surveys. Satisfactory global QOL scores were achieved. Advanced age correlated with greater impairment for the ability to taste and smell (P = 0.05). Radiotherapy seemed to be associated with "sticky saliva"; although this was not statistically significant (P = 0.06). Recurrent disease at the time of surgical ablation and microsurgical reconstruction did not seem to have any appreciable impact on QOL. Finally, patients who developed postoperative complications had lower levels of "cognitive functioning" (P = 0.04), problems with "insomnia" (P = 0.04) and "social contact" (P = 0.03), and more commonly "felt ill" (P = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: Improved global QOL scores were observed after microsurgical reconstruction of various head and neck defects when compared to reported pretreatment scores. Of the parameters analyzed, it seems that postoperative complications have the most profound effect on items assessed with the EORTC QLQ-C30 and H and N35 surveys. Our findings provide further scientific evidence that patients with head and neck malignancy benefit from surgical intervention with respect to postoperative QOL.

    View details for PubMedID 23486123

  • Is Microsurgical Head and Neck Reconstruction Profitable? Analysis at an Academic Medical Center ANNALS OF PLASTIC SURGERY Momeni, A., Kattan, A., Lee, G. K. 2012; 68 (4): 401-403

    Abstract

    The complexity of modern head and neck reconstruction is paralleled by consumption of large amounts of resources provided by both treating physicians as well as the institution, that is, hospital. In times of increasing economic constraints, analysis of the financial value of providing these services seems prudent. A retrospective analysis of medical and billing records of patients who underwent immediate microsurgical reconstruction of postablative head and neck defects from 2007 to 2010 at Stanford University Medical Center was performed. Financial data related to the treatment of 60 patients were analyzed. Total reimbursement for plastic surgery services was $319,609, representing a collection rate of 18.4%. Total hospital charges were $31,038,846.10. Actual reimbursement was $9,109,776.55, which represents a collection rate of 29.3%. Analysis of hospital revenue revealed a net profit of $1,512,136.46, which represents a mean net revenue of $25,202.27 per case. Microsurgical reconstruction secures substantial revenue for the institution. Innovative reimbursement models need to be implemented to attract skilled microsurgeons, who represent the backbone of these services.

    View details for DOI 10.1097/SAP.0b013e31823d2dec

    View details for Web of Science ID 000301800600017

    View details for PubMedID 22421488

  • The effect of preoperative radiotherapy on complication rate after microsurgical head and neck reconstruction JOURNAL OF PLASTIC RECONSTRUCTIVE AND AESTHETIC SURGERY Momeni, A., Kim, R. Y., Kattan, A., Tennefoss, J., Lee, T. H., Lee, G. K. 2011; 64 (11): 1454-1459

    Abstract

    The introduction of radiotherapy (XRT) has resulted in increased survival of patients diagnosed with head and neck malignancies. However, the potentially deleterious impact of radiotherapy on reconstructive efforts continues to be the subject of intense debate. The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of preoperative XRT on complication rates in patients undergoing microsurgical reconstruction of head and neck defects after oncosurgical resection.A retrospective cohort study was conducted of all patients who underwent immediate microsurgical reconstruction of post-ablative defects over a 3-year period. Study subjects were divided into two groups: (1) those who did not receive XRT and (2) those who received preoperative XRT. Clinical variables examined and analysed included age, gender, co-morbid conditions, tobacco history, the presence of recurrent disease and ischaemia time. Outcomes of interest included length of intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital stay and postoperative complications. Complications were further classified as flap-related as well as 'medical'.A total of 60 patients were included in this study (group 1: 26 patients; group 2: 34 patients). Results were similar between the study groups with the exception of a higher rate of flap-related complications in patients undergoing XRT. Overall, 19 patients (31.7%) experienced flap-related complications, with 12% of the patients being in group 1 (N=3) versus 47% of patients being in group 2 (N=16) (p=0.003).Our data suggest that preoperative radiotherapy is associated with a significant increase in postoperative flap-related complications. However, these did not result in a prolonged hospital stay, reflecting the fact that the majority of flap-related complications can be managed on an outpatient basis. Although microsurgical reconstruction is frequently successful, patients with a history of XRT should be informed preoperatively about their increased risk of complications.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.bjps.2011.06.043

    View details for Web of Science ID 000296579400015

    View details for PubMedID 21783448

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