Bio

Clinical Focus


  • Psychiatry

Academic Appointments


Professional Education


  • Residency:Stanford Hospital and Clinics (06/30/2009) CA
  • Board Certification: Psychiatry, American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology (2012)
  • Medical Education:University Of Illinois (05/18/2005) IL

Publications

Journal Articles


  • Smoking Behavior Postmvocardial Infarction Among ENRICHD Trial Participants: Cognitive Behavior Therapy Intervention for Depression and Low Perceived Social Support Compared With Care as Usual PSYCHOSOMATIC MEDICINE Trockel, M., Burg, M., Jaffe, A., Barbour, K., Taylor, C. B. 2008; 70 (8): 875-882

    Abstract

    Patients with cardiovascular disease who stop smoking lower their risk of subsequent morbidity and mortality. However, patients who have suffered a myocardial infarction (MI) are more likely to be depressed than the general population, which may make smoking cessation more difficult. Poor social support may also make smoking cessation more difficult for some patients. This study examines the effect of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for depression, low perceived social support or both on smoking behavior in post-MI patients.Participants were 1233 patients with a history of smoking enrolled in the Enhancing Recovery in Coronary Heart Disease Patients (ENRICHD) trial who provided 7-day point-prevalence smoking behavior information at baseline and at two or more follow-up assessments. The ENRICHD trial enrolled post-MI patients with depression, low perceived social support or both. Participants were randomly assigned to either CBT intervention or usual care. We used mixed effects models to accommodate data from multiple smoking point-prevalence measures for each individual participant.CBT did not significantly reduce post-MI smoking across all intervention patients with a history of smoking. However, CBT did reduce post-MI smoking among the subgroup of depressed patients with adequate perceived social support (OR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.47-0.98).CBT for depression without more specific attention to smoking cessation may have little overall value as a strategy for helping post-MI patients refrain from smoking. However, use of CBT to treat depression may have the gratuitous benefit of reducing smoking among some post-MI patients.

    View details for DOI 10.1097/PSY.0b013e3181842897

    View details for Web of Science ID 000260401100006

    View details for PubMedID 18842753

  • When the party for some becomes a problem for others: The effect of perceived secondhand consequences of drinking behavior on drinking norms JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY Trockel, M., Wall, A., Williams, S. S., Reis, J. 2008; 142 (1): 57-69

    Abstract

    The authors examined the influence of fraternity men's expectancies regarding secondhand consequences of excessive drinking behavior on normative standards regarding alcohol use and consumption levels. Participants were 381 men from 26 chapters of 2 national fraternities. One organization participated in a brief intervention involving discussion of secondhand consequences of excessive drinking. Immediate influence of the intervention on perceived secondhand consequences of alcohol use was assessed using a posttest-only, randomized groups design. Results supported a hypothesized measurement model with 1 overall secondhand consequence expectancy construct and 4 subfactors: (a) Noise Disruptive of Sleep and Study, (b) Violence, (c) Sexual Assault, and (d) Property Damage. Cross-sectional analysis at the chapter and individual levels demonstrated that secondhand expectancies had an indirect effect on alcohol consumption, mediated by personal consumption standards for limiting alcohol consumption. The intervention had an effect on secondhand expectancies. Findings suggest that interventions with intact groups can increase secondhand expectancies regarding excessive drinking and may lead to a reduction in excessive alcohol consumption.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000253432400004

    View details for PubMedID 18350844

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