Bio

Bio


Dr. Michelle Hauser is board certified in internal medicine and completed medical school, internal medicine residency, and a Master of Public Policy and Administration degree at Harvard, as well as a Master of Science in Epidemiology and Clinical Research at Stanford. She is also a certified chef via Le Cordon Bleu and currently serves on the Board of Directors for the American College of Lifestyle Medicine. At Stanford University School of Medicine, she is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and teaches nutrition and culinary medicine to medical students. She practices primary care for the County of San Mateo at Fair Oaks Health Center, a safety-net clinic in Redwood City, where she is also a teaching attending for Stanford Internal Medicine residents. Her research blends her training in medicine, public policy, nutrition, and culinary arts to focus on improving education and access to delicious, healthy food for medical professionals and the general public. Current research topics include: community-based participatory research (CBPR) utilizing lifestyle change interventions and technology for those in underserved communities with, or at risk of, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and obesity; food literacy; weight loss; diet quality; culinary medicine; teaching nutrition and cooking skills; and medical education around lifestyle-based prevention topics.

Honors & Awards


  • Zuckerman Fellow, Center for Public Leadership, Harvard Kennedy School of Government (2009-2010)
  • Letter of Achievement in Leadership, Center for Public Leadership, Harvard Kennedy School of Government (2011)
  • Leonard Tow Humanism in Medicine Award, Gold Foundation (2011)
  • Cambridge Integrated Clerkship Teaching Award, Cambridge Health Alliance, Cambridge, MA (2013)
  • Food Hero, Honorable Mention, City of Cambridge, Massachusetts (2013)

Boards, Advisory Committees, Professional Organizations


  • Board of Directors, American College of Lifestyle Medicine (2015 - Present)
  • Advisor, RENDLE (2016 - Present)
  • Member, American College of Lifestyle Medicine (2014 - Present)
  • Member, American College of Physicians (2012 - Present)
  • Member, Society of General Internal Medicine (2013 - Present)
  • Member, Primary Care Progress (2009 - Present)

Professional Education


  • Residency, Cambridge Health Alliance-Harvard Medical School, Internal Medicine (2014)
  • MD, Harvard Medical School (2011)
  • MPA, Harvard Kennedy School of Government, Public Policy, Public Administration (2011)
  • BS, Humboldt State University, Cellular/Molecular Biology, Chemistry (2006)
  • Diplôme, Le Cordon Bleu, Culinary Arts (2001)

Stanford Advisors


Personal Interests


- Research: Community-based participatory research & Clinical research
- Public education on how to make healthy lifestyle changes and avoid chronic disease
- Healthy cooking
- Nutrition
- Primary care & prevention -
- Public policy
- Improving access to health care
- Medical education
- Lifestyle medicine
- Writing
- Spanish language
- Endurance running & hiking

Research & Scholarship

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


Dr. Hauser is board certified in internal medicine and completed medical school, internal medicine residency, and a master’s of public administration at Harvard. She is also a certified chef via Le Cordon Bleu and currently serves on the Board of Directors for the American College of Lifestyle Medicine. She practices primary care for the County of San Mateo at Fair Oaks Health Center, a safety-net clinic in Redwood City, where she is also a teaching attending for Stanford internal medicine residents. Her research blend her training in medicine, public policy, nutrition, and culinary arts. Current research topics include: community-based participatory research (CBPR) utilizing lifestyle change interventions for those in underserved communities with, or at risk of, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and obesity; weight loss; access to healthy foods and safe places to exercise; teaching nutrition and cooking skills to increase intake of plant-based foods; diet quality; and medical education around lifestyle-based prevention topics.

Current Clinical Interests


  • Physician, Primary Care
  • Lifestyle Medicine

Teaching

Graduate and Fellowship Programs


Publications

All Publications


  • Dynapenia and Metabolic Health in Obese and Nonobese Adults Aged 70 Years and Older: The LIFE Study. Journal of the American Medical Directors Association Aubertin-Leheudre, M., Anton, S., Beavers, D. P., Manini, T. M., Fielding, R., Newman, A., Church, T., Kritchevsky, S. B., Conroy, D., McDermott, M. M., Botoseneanu, A., Hauser, M. E., Pahor, M. 2016

    Abstract

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between dynapenia and metabolic risk factors in obese and nonobese older adults.A total of 1453 men and women (age ≥70 years) from the Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders (LIFE) Study were categorized as (1) nondynapenic/nonobese (NDYN-NO), (2) dynapenic/nonobese (DYN-NO), (3) nondynapenic/obese (NDYN-O), or (4) dynapenic/obese (DYN-O), based on muscle strength (Foundation for the National Institute of Health criteria) and body mass index. Dependent variables were blood lipids, fasting glucose, blood pressure, presence of at least 3 metabolic syndrome (MetS) criteria, and other chronic conditions.A significantly higher likelihood of having abdominal obesity criteria in NDYN-NO compared with DYN-NO groups (55.6 vs 45.1%, P ≤ .01) was observed. Waist circumference also was significantly higher in obese groups (DYN-O = 114.0 ± 12.9 and NDYN-O = 111.2 ± 13.1) than in nonobese (NDYN-NO = 93.1 ± 10.7 and DYN-NO = 92.2 ± 11.2, P ≤ .01); and higher in NDYN-O compared with DYN-O (P = .008). Additionally, NDYN-O demonstrated higher diastolic blood pressure compared with DYN-O (70.9 ± 10.1 vs 67.7 ± 9.7, P ≤ .001). No significant differences were found across dynapenia and obesity status for all other metabolic components (P > .05). The odds of having MetS or its individual components were similar in obese and nonobese, combined or not with dynapenia (nonsignificant odds ratio [95% confidence interval]).Nonobese dynapenic older adults had fewer metabolic disease risk factors than nonobese and nondynapenic older adults. Moreover, among obese older adults, dynapenia was associated with lower risk of meeting MetS criteria for waist circumference and diastolic blood pressure. Additionally, the presence of dynapenia did not increase cardiometabolic disease risk in either obese or nonobese older adults.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jamda.2016.10.001

    View details for PubMedID 27914851

  • Lifestyle Medicine: A Primary Care Perspective Journal of Graduate Medical Education Clarke, C. A., Hauser, M. E. 2016; 8 (5): 665-667
  • DIETFITS study (diet intervention examining the factors interacting with treatment success) - Study design and methods. Contemporary clinical trials Stanton, M. V., Robinson, J. L., Kirkpatrick, S. M., Farzinkhou, S., Avery, E. C., Rigdon, J., Offringa, L. C., Trepanowski, J. F., Hauser, M. E., Hartle, J. C., Cherin, R. J., King, A. C., Ioannidis, J. P., Desai, M., Gardner, C. D. 2016; 53: 151–61

    Abstract

    Numerous studies have attempted to identify successful dietary strategies for weight loss, and many have focused on Low-Fat vs. Low-Carbohydrate comparisons. Despite relatively small between-group differences in weight loss found in most previous studies, researchers have consistently observed relatively large between-subject differences in weight loss within any given diet group (e.g., ~25kg weight loss to ~5kg weight gain). The primary objective of this study was to identify predisposing individual factors at baseline that help explain differential weight loss achieved by individuals assigned to the same diet, particularly a pre-determined multi-locus genotype pattern and insulin resistance status. Secondary objectives included discovery strategies for further identifying potential genetic risk scores. Exploratory objectives included investigation of an extensive set of physiological, psychosocial, dietary, and behavioral variables as moderating and/or mediating variables and/or secondary outcomes. The target population was generally healthy, free-living adults with BMI 28-40kg/m(2) (n=600). The intervention consisted of a 12-month protocol of 22 one-hour evening instructional sessions led by registered dietitians, with ~15-20 participants/class. Key objectives of dietary instruction included focusing on maximizing the dietary quality of both Low-Fat and Low-Carbohydrate diets (i.e., Healthy Low-Fat vs. Healthy Low-Carbohydrate), and maximally differentiating the two diets from one another. Rather than seeking to determine if one dietary approach was better than the other for the general population, this study sought to examine whether greater overall weight loss success could be achieved by matching different people to different diets. Here we present the design and methods of the study.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.cct.2016.12.021

    View details for PubMedID 28027950

  • Shared Medical Appointments: A Portal for Nutrition and Culinary Education in Primary Care-A Pilot Feasibility Project. Global advances in health and medicine : improving healthcare outcomes worldwide Delichatsios, H. K., Hauser, M. E., Burgess, J. D., Eisenberg, D. M. 2015; 4 (6): 22-26

    Abstract

    Diseases linked to obesity such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, degenerative joint disease, gastroesophageal reflux, and sleep apnea constitute a large portion of primary care visits. Patients with these conditions often lack knowledge, skills, and support needed to maintain health. Shared medical appointments (SMAs) that include culinary skills and nutrition education offer a novel, cost-effective way to address these diseases in primary care.Adult patients in a primary care practice at a large academic hospital in Boston, Massachusetts, who had at least 1 cardiovascular risk factor were invited to participate in SMAs that included cooking demonstrations and teaching about nutrition in addition to medical management of their conditions. Sessions were conducted by a physician and an assistant in a conference room of a traditional primary care practice as part of a pilot feasibility project.Seventy patients, contributing a total of 156 patient visits, attended 17 nutrition-focused SMAs over a 4-year period. Patients were surveyed after each visit and indicated that they enjoyed the SMAs, would consider alternating SMAs with traditional one-on-one visits, and would recommend SMAs to others. Half would pay out of pocket or a higher copay to attend SMAs. Financially, the practice broke even compared with traditional one-onone office visits.In this feasibility study, chronic disease SMAs conducted with a culinary/nutrition focus were feasible, cost-effective, and well received by patients. Follow-up studies are needed to evaluate short- and long-term outcomes of this SMA model on obesity-related diseases.

    View details for DOI 10.7453/gahmj.2015.060

    View details for PubMedID 26665019