Bio

Clinical Focus


  • Oncology

Academic Appointments


Professional Education


  • Fellowship:Stanford University - Hematology and Oncology (2012) CA
  • Residency:Stanford University Hospital -Internal Medicine Residency Training Program (2010) CA
  • Board Certification: Internal Medicine, American Board of Genetic Counseling (2010)
  • Medical Education:UC Irvine School of Medicine (2007) CA

Research & Scholarship

Clinical Trials


  • Study of Pasireotide Long Acting Release (LAR) in Patients With Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (NETs) Not Recruiting

    The goal of this clinical research study is to learn if the study drug, Pasireotide LAR can shrink or slow the growth of Metastatic Neuroendocrine Carcinomas. The safety of this drug will also be studied. The patient's physical state, changes in the size of the tumor, and laboratory findings taken while on-study will help us decide if Pasireotide LAR is safe and effective.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Prachi Nandoskar, (650) 725 - 0438.

    View full details

Publications

Journal Articles


  • Risk of Therapy-Related Secondary Leukemia in Hodgkin Lymphoma: The Stanford University Experience Over Three Generations of Clinical Trials JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY Koontz, M. Z., Horning, S. J., Balise, R., Greenberg, P. L., Rosenberg, S. A., Hoppe, R. T., Advani, R. H. 2013; 31 (5): 592-598

    Abstract

    To assess therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia/myelodysplastic syndrome (t-AML/MDS) risk in patients treated for Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) on successive generations of Stanford clinical trials.Patients with HL treated at Stanford with at least 5 years of follow-up after completing therapy were identified from our database. Records were reviewed for outcome and development of t-AML/MDS.Seven hundred fifty-four patients treated from 1974 to 2003 were identified. Therapy varied across studies. Radiotherapy evolved from extended fields (S and C studies) to involved fields (G studies). Primary chemotherapy was mechlorethamine, vincristine, procarbazine, and prednisone (MOPP) or procarbazine, mechlorethamine, and vinblastine (PAVe) in S studies; MOPP, PAVe, vinblastine, bleomycin, and methotrexate (VBM), or doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine (ABVD) in C studies; and VbM (reduced dose of bleomycin compared with VBM) or mechlorethamine, doxorubicin, vinblastine, vincristine, bleomycin, etoposide, and prednisone (Stanford V) in G studies. Cumulative exposure to alkylating agent (AA) was notably lower in the G studies compared with the S and C studies, with a 75% to 83% lower dose of nitrogen mustard in addition to omission of procarbazine and melphalan. Twenty-four (3.2%) of 754 patients developed t-AML/MDS, 15 after primary chemotherapy and nine after salvage chemotherapy for relapsed HL. The incidence of t-AML/MDS was significantly lower in the G studies (0.3%) compared with the S (5.7%) or C (5.2%) studies (P < .001). Additionally, in the G studies, no t-AML/MDS was noted after primary therapy, and the only patient who developed t-AML/MDS did so after second-line therapy.Our data demonstrate the relationship between the cumulative AA dose and t-AML/MDS. Limiting the dose of AA and decreased need for secondary treatments have significantly reduced the incidence of t-AML/MDS, which was extremely rare in the G studies (Stanford V era).

    View details for DOI 10.1200/JCO.2012.44.5791

    View details for Web of Science ID 000314820400017

    View details for PubMedID 23295809

  • Neoadjuvant Imatinib for Borderline Resectable GIST JOURNAL OF THE NATIONAL COMPREHENSIVE CANCER NETWORK Koontz, M. Z., Visser, B. M., Kunz, P. L. 2012; 10 (12): 1477-1482

    Abstract

    A 36-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with black stools and syncope. Her hemoglobin was 7.0 and her red blood cells were microcytic. Upper endoscopy did not identify a clear source of bleeding, but a bulge in the third portion of the duodenum was noted. A CT scan showed a large extraintestinal mass, and follow-up esophagogastroduodenoscopy/endoscopic ultrasound with biopsy revealed a spindle cell neoplasm, consistent with gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). Because of the size of the lesion and association with the superior mesenteric vein and common bile duct, she was referred to medical oncology for consideration of neoadjuvant imatinib. Neoadjuvant tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy for GISTs is emerging as a viable treatment strategy for borderline resectable tumors, although the dose, duration, and optimal imaging modalities have not been clearly established. Recent pathologic and radiographic data have provided insight into the mechanism and kinetics of this approach. This case report presents a patient for whom surgery was facilitated using neoadjuvant imatinib.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000312114200004

    View details for PubMedID 23221786

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