Bio

Clinical Focus


  • Internal Medicine

Academic Appointments


Professional Education


  • Medical Education:Washington U Sch of Medicine (1967)
  • Residency:Stanford University School of Medicine (1974) CA
  • Residency:Stanford University School of Medicine (1970) CA
  • Internship:Bronx Municipal Hospital Ctr (1968) NY
  • Fellowship:Stanford University School of Medicine (1971) CA
  • Residency:Bronx Municipal Hospital Ctr (1969) NY
  • Board Certification: Internal Medicine, American Board of Internal Medicine (1973)

Publications

Journal Articles


  • Review: hospital-at-home care does not increase mortality or readmission rates in acute exacerbations of COPD. ACP journal club Jacobs, M. B. 2004; 140 (3): 59-?

    View details for PubMedID 15122822

  • Clinical problem-solving. Eyes wide open. New England journal of medicine Morton-Bours, E. C., Jacobs, M. B., Albers, G. W. 2000; 343 (1): 50-55

    View details for PubMedID 10882769

  • Osteoma cutis (cutaneous ossification) WESTERN JOURNAL OF MEDICINE Fazeli, P., Harvell, J., Jacobs, M. B. 1999; 171 (4): 243-245

    View details for Web of Science ID 000083535400016

    View details for PubMedID 10578679

  • A dangerous profession WESTERN JOURNAL OF MEDICINE Morton, J. A., Jacobs, M. B. 1996; 164 (3): 276-276

    View details for Web of Science ID A1996UC02300019

    View details for PubMedID 8775948

  • ADULT OBSTRUCTIVE SLEEP-APNEA WITH SECONDARY ENURESIS WESTERN JOURNAL OF MEDICINE Brown, M. A., Jacobs, M. B., Pelayo, R. 1995; 163 (5): 478-480

    View details for Web of Science ID A1995TF58500017

    View details for PubMedID 8533419

  • FACULTY STATUS FOR CLINICIAN - EDUCATORS - GUIDELINES FOR EVALUATION AND PROMOTION ACADEMIC MEDICINE Jacobs, M. B. 1993; 68 (2): 126-128

    View details for Web of Science ID A1993KM61800005

    View details for PubMedID 8431229

  • REFLECTIONS ON THE ANION GAP IN HYPERGLYCEMIA WESTERN JOURNAL OF MEDICINE Varon, J., Jacobs, M. B., Mahoney, C. A. 1992; 157 (6): 670-672

    View details for Web of Science ID A1992KC08300016

    View details for PubMedID 1475959

  • ENHANCING THE TRAINING OF INTERNAL-MEDICINE RESIDENTS AT STANFORD BY ESTABLISHING A MODEL GROUP-PRACTICE AND RAISING ITS CLINICAL EDUCATORS STATUS ACADEMIC MEDICINE Jacobs, M. B., Tower, D. 1992; 67 (10): 623-630

    Abstract

    The education of residents is shifting to the ambulatory care setting. In addition, there is a growing trend toward managed care and increasing competition for patients to be served by "real-world" practices. The authors describe the formation and operation of a program that was established in 1981 at the Stanford University School of Medicine to respond to these changes: the Stanford Medical Group (SMG), a model group practice in internal medicine that operates within the academic medical center. Because raising the status of the clinician-educator faculty was a critical issue for the SMG, the authors also describe the Medical Center Professoriate, a separate faculty track created in 1989 to recognize and reward Stanford's clinician-educators. The authors conclude that the SMG has succeeded in its training and patient care goals and has weathered the great changes in the health care environment that have taken place since 1981. They also report that the separate faculty track is serving its purpose well. They hope that educators and program directors at other academic medical centers may find the descriptions of the SMG and the professoriate useful in solving similar problems.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1992JU07800001

    View details for PubMedID 1388521

  • SPONTANEOUS INTRACRANIAL HYPOTENSION - AN UNCOMMON AND UNDERRECOGNIZED CAUSE OF HEADACHE WESTERN JOURNAL OF MEDICINE Jacobs, M. B., Wasserstein, P. H. 1991; 155 (2): 178-180

    View details for Web of Science ID A1991GA96400018

    View details for PubMedID 1926855

  • TREATING THE PROGRESSIVE STAGES OF PARKINSONS-DISEASE .2. POSTGRADUATE MEDICINE Varon, J., Jacobs, M. B. 1991; 90 (1): 63-?

    Abstract

    Parkinson's disease affects thousands of Americans, men and women equally and apparently with little regard to race. Its diagnosis depends largely on repeated clinical observations of representative signs, such as resting tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia, and gait disturbances. Patients progress through stages: Early disease involves only one limb or side and confers minimal disability, but advanced disease restricts patients to full care. Treatment is chosen on the basis of disease stage and patient response. Combination carbidopa-levodopa (Sinemet) is appropriate for any significant degree of disability, and other antiparkinsonian drugs and anticholinergic agents may be used as adjuncts. Electroconvulsive therapy, use of selegiline hydrochloride (Eldepryl), and surgery are still undergoing investigation but may hold promise.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1991FX06500013

    View details for PubMedID 1905807

  • GYNECOMASTIA - A BOTHERSOME BUT READILY TREATABLE PROBLEM POSTGRADUATE MEDICINE Jacobs, M. B. 1991; 89 (2): 191-?

    Abstract

    Although breast enlargement in boys and men can cause both psychological and physical distress, the disorder is rarely serious and is readily treatable. Several factors can lead to the estrogenic excess that causes growth of breast tissue. Dr Jacobs describes a patient with gynecomastia related to cirrhosis of the liver who responded promptly to a brief course of tamoxifen citrate therapy.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1991EW73100022

    View details for PubMedID 1990392

  • IATROGENIC DISEASE AND THE PRIMARY CARE PHYSICIAN POSTGRADUATE MEDICINE Jacobs, M. B. 1990; 87 (1): 105-?

    Abstract

    Primary care physicians need to be aware of iatrogenic disease and its causes. Adverse drug reactions, including drug-drug interactions, and certain diagnostic procedures may lead to iatrogenic complications. Hospitalized patients, especially the elderly, face increased risks of such complications. Physicians who are aware of common adverse reactions to drugs, drug combinations, and medical procedures may be able to help patients avoid unnecessary distress and morbidity.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1990CK01300012

    View details for PubMedID 2296559

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