Bio

Clinical Focus


  • Emergency Medicine

Academic Appointments


Honors & Awards


  • Hero of Emergency Medicine For "Outstanding achievement and dedication to emergency medicine”, American College of Emergency Physicians (2008)
  • Wiegenstein Award "For inspiration, dedication, advocacy, and vision", American College of Emergency Physicians (The College's highest award) (1994)
  • Walter T. Edwards Award for Outstanding Service, California Chapter, ACEP - (The Chapter's highest award for leadership) (1990)
  • Special Resolution of Commendation for Outstanding Service, American College of Emergency Physicians (1993)
  • Honorary Member, American College of Emergency Physicians (1994)
  • Council Meritorious Service Award, National Council, American College of Emergency Physicians (1997)

Professional Education


  • Fellowship:Santa Clara Valley Medical Center (1974) CA
  • Internship:Santa Clara Valley Medical Center (1974) CA
  • Residency:Stanford University School of Medicine (1979) CA
  • Board Certification: Emergency Medicine, American Board of Emergency Medicine (1981)
  • Medical Education:Stanford University School of Medicine (1973) CA
  • M.D., Stanford University, Medicine (1973)
  • B.A., Amherst College, Biology (1968)

Community and International Work


  • Health Care Legislation

    Topic

    Federal & State Legislation

    Partnering Organization(s)

    ACEP; CAL/ACEP; CMA

    Populations Served

    Emergency department patients

    Location

    US

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    Yes

  • Emergency Medicine education, Bhutan; Nepal; Kenya; Israel; Brazil; China; Vietnam

    Topic

    Teaching emergency medicine

    Partnering Organization(s)

    ACEP; CALl/ACEP

    Populations Served

    Local populations; American delegations

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    No

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

Research & Scholarship

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


Health Care Policy & Legislation

Teaching

2013-14 Courses


Publications

Journal Articles


  • Textbook of Cardiovascular Care and CPR Field, J., Bresler MJ, Kudenchuk PJ, Mattu A, OConnor R, Silvers SM 2009
  • Reperfusion strategies in the emergency treatment of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction AMERICAN JOURNAL OF EMERGENCY MEDICINE Peacock, W. F., Hollander, J. E., Smalling, R. W., Bresler, M. J. 2007; 25 (3): 353-366

    Abstract

    Prompt restoration of blood flow is the primary treatment goal in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction to optimize clinical outcomes. The ED plays a critical role in rapid triage, diagnosis, and management of ST-elevation myocardial infarction, and in the decision about which of the 2 recommended reperfusion options, that is, pharmacologic and mechanical (catheter-based) strategies, to undertake. Guidelines recommend percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) if the medical contact-to-balloon time can be kept under 90 minutes, and timely administration of fibrinolytics if greater than 90 minutes. Most US hospitals do not have PCI facilities, which means the decision becomes whether to treat with a fibrinolytic agent, transfer, or both, followed by PCI if needed. Whichever reperfusion approach is used, successful treatment depends on the ED having an integrated and efficient protocol that is followed with haste. Protocols should be regularly reviewed to accommodate changes in clinical practice arising from ongoing clinical trials.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.ajem.2006.07.013

    View details for Web of Science ID 000245163100017

    View details for PubMedID 17349914

  • Bresler M, Sternbach G: Manual of Emergency Medicine. Bresler MJ, Sternbach, GL 1998
  • Acute myocardial infarction: subtleties of diagnosis in the emergency department. Annals of emergency medicine BRESLER, M. J., Gibler, W. B. 1990: 1-15

    View details for PubMedID 2301786

  • FUTURE-ROLE OF THROMBOLYTIC THERAPY IN EMERGENCY MEDICINE ANNALS OF EMERGENCY MEDICINE BRESLER, M. J. 1989; 18 (12): 1331-1338

    Abstract

    Thrombolytic therapy offers the promise of major therapeutic intervention in many areas as well as in the treatment of patients with acute myocardial infarction who present to the emergency department. Infusion of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) during field transport has been proven safe, but optimal methods for reliably diagnosing acute myocardial infarction in the prehospital setting have yet to be delineated. A major advance would be achieved if thrombolysis were proven effective in preventing the progression of unstable angina to actual infarction. However, early studies have yielded contradictory results. The use of tPA in dissolving peripheral arterial clots appears very promising, but long-term limb survival has yet to be demonstrated. Unlike heparin, thrombolytic agents can also lyse clot in peripheral deep veins and possibly lessen the tendency toward postphlebitic syndrome. The proper dosage regimen to minimize hemorrhage has not been determined. Pulmonary emboli can be lysed by tPA. IV infusion is as effective as intrapulmonary. Significant complications can be minimized, particularly if major vessel catheterization can be avoided for diagnosis. Even after catheterization for pulmonary angiography, however, thrombolytic therapy appears quite promising. The use of thrombolytic agents for embolic-thrombotic stroke is less promising: therefore, the risk of hemorrhagic complication may not outweigh the potential benefit. Thrombolytic therapy thus offers the potential for significant impact on the practice of emergency medicine.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1989CC66800014

    View details for PubMedID 2511790

  • Near-fatal suicidal hanging. journal of emergency medicine Sternbach, G., BRESLER, M. J. 1989; 7 (5): 513-516

    View details for PubMedID 2607113

  • The adult respiratory distress syndrome. Emergency medicine clinics of North America BRESLER, M. J., Sternbach, G. L. 1989; 7 (2): 419-430

    Abstract

    ARDS is a pulmonary injury syndrome associated with a variety of clinical disorders. The pathophysiology of ARDS has been clarified substantially in the past several years. Neutrophils are probably the chief mediators of pulmonary injury, serving as the focus for release of several toxic substances that cause capillary endothelial and alveolar epithelial damage. The mortality rate in ARDS remains high despite advances in elucidating of pathogenesis. Newer approaches to management stress earlier identification of patients and specific therapy aimed at interfering with the damage produced by toxic mediators of pulmonary injury.

    View details for PubMedID 2653808

  • Emergency medicine: computed tomography versus peritoneal lavage in blunt abdominal trauma. Western journal of medicine BRESLER, M. J. 1987; 146 (5): 610-?

    View details for PubMedID 18750249

  • COMPUTED-TOMOGRAPHY OF THE ABDOMEN ANNALS OF EMERGENCY MEDICINE BRESLER, M. J. 1986; 15 (3): 280-285

    View details for Web of Science ID A1986A189000015

    View details for PubMedID 3511790

  • The agenda for emergency medicine. American journal of emergency medicine BRESLER, M. J. 1984; 2 (2): 175-176

    View details for PubMedID 6518003

  • The polarization of emergency medical care. American journal of emergency medicine BRESLER, M. J. 1983; 1 (2): 240-241

    View details for PubMedID 6680626

  • TOXIC SHOCK SYNDROME DUE TO OCCULT POSTOPERATIVE WOUND-INFECTION WESTERN JOURNAL OF MEDICINE BRESLER, M. J. 1983; 139 (5): 710-713

    View details for Web of Science ID A1983RU81000023

    View details for PubMedID 6659496

  • OCCULT CERVICAL-SPINE FRACTURE IN AN AMBULATORY PATIENT ANNALS OF EMERGENCY MEDICINE BRESLER, M. J., RICH, G. H. 1982; 11 (8): 440-442

    Abstract

    Significant injury to the cervical spine many not be obvious in patients whose mental status is decreased. We present the case of a fully conscious, ambulatory patient with no complaint of neck pain and only mild tenderness on examination who nevertheless had sustained an unstable fracture-dislocation of the cervical spine. Following surgery, the patient recovered without permanent neurologic sequelae. Criteria are suggested for ordering radiographic studies of the cervical spine for victims of trauma.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1982PH08000011

    View details for PubMedID 7103163

  • SCREENING FOR GLAUCOMA IN PATIENTS RECEIVING PSYCHOTROPICS PSYCHOSOMATICS Hoffman, R. S. 1982; 23 (2): 205-206

    View details for Web of Science ID A1982ND30900009

    View details for PubMedID 7071308

  • PRECEPTORSHIPS FOR EMERGENCY PHYSICIANS ANNALS OF EMERGENCY MEDICINE ELIASTAM, M., BRESLER, M. J., Gold, I. 1981; 10 (7): 381-384

    Abstract

    We describe a preceptorship developed in response to needs identified by surveys of emergency physicians in our community. The policies and procedures necessary to establish the program and the problems encountered are described. Major factors influencing the success of these programs include commitment by the institution's faculty, availability of administrative staff, financial support, and ongoing evaluation and feedback. A set of recommendations is offered for educational institutions considering the establishment of preceptorships.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1981LW04400010

    View details for PubMedID 7247094

  • PREVENTION OF LATROGENIC ACUTE NARROW-ANGLE GLAUCOMA ANNALS OF EMERGENCY MEDICINE BRESLER, M. J., Hoffman, R. S. 1981; 10 (10): 535-537

    Abstract

    The pathophysiology of glaucoma is reviewed, and the risks of pharmacologic pupillary dilation are discussed. A simple transillumination screening test for identifying patients in whom mydriasis presents a risk is described.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1981MH91500010

    View details for PubMedID 7283221

Stanford Medicine Resources: