Bio

Clinical Focus


  • Cancer > Hematology
  • Hematology
  • Oncology

Academic Appointments


Professional Education


  • Board Certification: Medical Oncology, American Board of Internal Medicine (2013)
  • Board Certification: Hematology, American Board of Internal Medicine (2013)
  • Fellowship:Stanford University School of Medicine (2012) CA
  • Residency:Stanford University School of Medicine (2010) CA
  • Board Certification, Oncology (2013)
  • Board Certification, Hematology (2013)
  • Board Certification: Internal Medicine, American Board of Internal Medicine (2010)
  • Medical Education:David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA (2007) CA

Research & Scholarship

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


I aim to provide high quality care in a diverse patient practice. My clinic includes all types of hematologic disorders, ranging from anemia, clotting/bleeding disorders, and low blood counts to complex malignancies such as leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, myeloma, and lymphoma.

My research interests include the advancement of personalized genomic medicine and the development of targeted therapeutics for cancer therapy.

My goal is to combine the efficiency of a private office with the complex care expected of a tertiary institution like Stanford. I value your time and strive to maintain an on-schedule clinic.

Clinical Trials


  • A Study Being Conducted at Multiple Locations to Compare Safety and Efficacy of Three Different Regimens; (1) High-Dose Lenalidomide; (2) Lenalidomide + Azacitidine; or (3) Azacitidine in Subjects ? 65 Years With Newly-Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia Not Recruiting

    The study aim is to compare safety and efficacy of high-dose lenalidomide regimen, sequential azacitidine and lenalidomide and an azacitidine in persons ?65 years with newly-diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Jack Taw, (650) 723 - 2781.

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  • Efficacy and Safety of Idelalisib in Combination With Rituximab in Patients With Previously Untreated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia With 17p Deletion Not Recruiting

    This study will evaluate the effect of treatment with idelalisib (IDELA) plus rituximab on overall response rate (ORR); onset, magnitude, and duration of disease control (including duration of response [DOR], progression free survival [PFS], and overall survival [OS]); and minimal residual disease (MRD) in subjects with previously untreated chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) with 17p deletion. In addition, the study will evaluate the safety profile observed with the combination of IDELA and rituximab.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Nini Estevez, 650-725-4041.

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  • Combination 5-azacitidine and Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin Therapy for Treatment of Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) Not Recruiting

    This study will test an experimental combination of the drugs Mylotarg and 5-azacitidine in the hopes of finding a treatment that may be effective against Acute Myeloid Leukemia that has come back after treatment.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Jack Taw, (650) 723 - 2781.

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  • S0919 Idarubicin, Cytarabine, and Pravastatin in Treating Patients With Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia Not Recruiting

    RATIONALE: Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as idarubicin and cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Pravastatin may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Pravastatin may also help idarubicin and cytarabine work better by making cancer cells more sensitive to the drugs. Giving idarubicin and cytarabine together with pravastatin may kill more cancer cells. PURPOSE: This phase II trial is studying how well giving idarubicin and cytarabine together with pravastatin works in treating patients with relapsed acute myeloid leukemia.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Joselene Sipin-Sayno, 650-736-8113.

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  • Safety & Efficacy Study of Oral Panobinostat (LBH589) With Chemotherapy in Patients < 65 Years Old With Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) Not Recruiting

    This study will be conducted to assess the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of panobinostat given 3 times a week (administered on weeks 2 and 3 of a 4 week cycle) in combination with induction chemotherapy (idarubicin and cytarabine) in newly diagnosed patients with a cytopathologically confirmed diagnosis of high-risk AML, and to investigate the safety of the combination in this regimen.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Jack Taw, (650) 723 - 2781.

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  • A Phase 2 Open-Label Study of the Efficacy and Safety of ABT-199 (GDC-0199) in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) Subjects With Relapse or Refractory to B-Cell Receptor Signaling Pathway Inhibitor Therapy Recruiting

    This is an open-label, non-randomized, multicenter, Phase 2 study evaluating the efficacy and safety of ABT-199 in approximately 120 subjects with relapsed or refractory CLL after B-cell receptor signaling pathway inhibitors (BCR PI) treatment.

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  • Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Not Recruiting

    This phase II trial is studying the side effects of giving combination chemotherapy together with or without donor stem cell transplant and to see how well it works in treating patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) may kill more cancer cells. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It also stops the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. The donated stem cells may replace the patient's immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells (graft-versus-tumor effect).

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Vani Jain, (650) 725 - 5459.

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  • Phase 1/2, Open Label, Dose Escalation Study of NEOD001 in Subjects With Light Chain (AL) Amyloidosis Not Recruiting

    Dose escalation study to determine the maximum tolerated dose of NEOD001 in approximately 30 subjects with AL amyloidosis. Expansion phase to evaluate safety, efficacy and pharmacokinetics of NEOD001 in 25 additional subjects at the maximum tolerated dose.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Ying Hao, 650-723-0646.

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  • Expanded Treatment Prot of Panobinostat in Combo w/ Bortez and Dex in Pts w/ Relapsed and/or Refractory Multiple Myeloma Not Recruiting

    This will be a multi-center, open label, expanded treatment protocol of panobinostat, bortezomib and dexamethasone in patients with relapsed and/or refractory multiple myeloma. Panobinostat will be administered at a starting dose of 20mg orally three times a week (every other day) for two weeks on and one week off, with dose adjustments permitted based on observed toxicity. Bortezomib will be administered either intravenously or sub-cutaneously, twice a week on days 1 and 4, two weeks on 1 week off. After 8 cycles of treatment, patients who have achieved stable disease or better by modified EBMT 1998 criteria may continue combination therapy with bortezomib dosing changed to days 1 and 8 of a 21 day cycle for up to 48 weeks of therapy. At the end of the treatment period, (48 weeks) patients with stable disease or better may continue on therapy at the discretion of their investigator until September 2015 or until drug is commercially available, whichever comes first. Patients who have not achieved at least stable disease by 8 cycles must discontinue from study treatment. Dexamethasone will be administered on the day of and the day immediately following bortezomib treatment. Patients will not receive any study treatment during the third week of each cycle. Cycles will be defined as 21 days of treatment. Investigators may not add any other anti-myeloma agents (with the exception of bisphosphonates) while patients remain on study treatment. Patients will remain on study until disease progression, unacceptable toxicity, or end of the study

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Ying Hao, 650-723-0646.

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  • Efficacy and Safety Study of Idelalisib in Subjects With Indolent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Not Recruiting

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of idelalisib in patients with previously treated indolent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (iNHL) that is refractory both to rituximab and to alkylating-agent-containing chemotherapy. The primary objective will be to assess the overall response rate. Eligible patients will initiate oral therapy with idelalisib at a starting dose of 150 mg taken twice per day. Treatment with idelalisib can continue in compliant patients as long as the study is still ongoing and the patients appear to be benefiting from treatment with acceptable safety.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Tessa St.Rose, (650) 736 - 4032.

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  • S1312, Inotuzumab Ozogamicin and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia Not Recruiting

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of inotuzumab ozogamicin when given together with combination chemotherapy in treating patients with relapsed or refractory acute leukemia. Immunotoxins, such as inotuzumab ozogamicin, can find cancer cells that express cluster of differentiation (CD)22 and kill them without harming normal cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, vincristine sulfate, and prednisone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving inotuzumab ozogamicin together with combination chemotherapy may kill more cancer cells.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Kevin Morrison, 650-725-5450.

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  • Rituximab and Bendamustine Hydrochloride, Rituximab and Ibrutinib, or Ibrutinib Alone in Treating Older Patients With Previously Untreated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Not Recruiting

    This randomized phase III trial studies rituximab with bendamustine hydrochloride or ibrutinib to see how well they work compared to ibrutinib alone in treating older patients with previously untreated chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab, may block cancer growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as bendamustine hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Ibrutinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether rituximab with bendamustine hydrochloride may work better than rituximab and ibrutinib or ibrutinib alone in treating chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Kevin Morrison, 650-725-5459.

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  • Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Blinatumomab in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed BCR-ABL-Negative B Lineage Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Not Recruiting

    This randomized phase III trial studies combination chemotherapy with blinatumomab to see how well it works compared to induction chemotherapy alone in treating patients with newly diagnosed breakpoint cluster region (BCR)-c-abl oncogene 1, non-receptor tyrosine kinase (ABL)-negative B lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may block cancer growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. It is not yet known whether combination chemotherapy is more effective with or without blinatumomab in treating newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Joselene Sipin-Sayno, 650-736-8113.

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  • Efficacy of Oral Azacitidine Plus Best Supportive Care as Maintenance Therapy in Subjects With Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Complete Remission Not Recruiting

    This study will enroll approximately 460 subjects, aged 55 or older, with a diagnosis of de novo AML (Acute Myeloid Leukemia) or AML secondary to prior myelodysplastic disease or chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML), and who have achieved first Complete remission (CR)/ Complete remission with incomplete blood count recovery (CRi) following induction with or without consolidation chemotherapy. Subjects who have previously achieved CR/CRi with a hypomethylating agent will be excluded from the study.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Jack Taw, 650-723-1269.

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  • An Extension Study for Subjects Who Are Deriving Benefit With Idelalisib (GS-1101; CAL-101) Following Completion of a Prior Idelalisib Study Recruiting

    This is a long-term safety extension study of idelalisib (GS-1101; CAL-101) in patients with hematologic malignancies who complete other idelalisib studies. It provides the opportunity for patients to continue treatment as long as the patient is deriving clinical benefit. Patients will be followed according to the standard of care as appropriate for their type of cancer. The dose of idelalisib will generally be the same as the dose that was administered at the end of the prior study, but may be titrated up to improve clinical response or down for toxicity. Patients will be withdrawn from the study if they develop progressive disease, unacceptable toxicity related to idelalisib, or if they no longer derive clinical benefit in the opinion of the investigator.

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  • A Study of Vismodegib in Patients With Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myelogenous Leukemia and Relapsed Refractory High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome Not Recruiting

    This study will assess the safety and efficacy of vismodegib in patients with relapsed/refractory acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and relapsed/refractory high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Patients in Cohort 1 will receive single-agent vismodegib 150 mg orally daily. In Cohort 2, patients will receive vismodegib 150 mg orally daily in combination with cytarabine 20 mg subcutaneously for 10 days. Anticipated time on study treatment is until disease progression, intolerable toxicity, or patient withdrawal of consent.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Marlene Zuraek, (650) 736-4031.

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  • Safety and Efficacy Study of Pracinostat With Azacitadine in Elderly Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) Not Recruiting

    The purpose of this study is to determine the safety and effectiveness of pracinostat when combined with azacitadine for patients who are 65 years of age or older and have Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML)

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Leilani Hong Lien, 650-725-0437.

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  • (QuANTUM-R): An Open-label Study of Quizartinib Monotherapy vs. Salvage Chemotherapy in Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) Subjects Who Are FLT3-ITD Positive Not Recruiting

    The primary objective of the study is to determine whether quizartinib monotherapy prolongs overall survival (OS) compared to salvage chemotherapy in subjects with FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 - Internal Tandem Duplication (FLT3-ITD) positive AML who are refractory to or have relapsed within 6 months, after first-line AML therapy.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Jack Taw, 650-723-2781.

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  • Study to Investigate Idelalisib in Combination With Chemotherapeutic Agents, Immunomodulatory Agents and Anti-CD20 Monoclonal Antibody (mAb) in Subjects With Relapsed or Refractory Indolent B-cell Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Mantle Cell Lymphoma or Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Not Recruiting

    This study will evaluate the safety and clinical activity of idelalisib in combination with an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (mAb), a chemotherapeutic agent, an mTOR inhibitor, a protease inhibitor, an antiangiogenic agent, and/or an immunomodulatory agent in participants with relapsed or refractory indolent B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), or chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL).

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Nini Estevez, 650725-4041.

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  • S0535, Gemtuzumab and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia Not Recruiting

    RATIONALE: Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Monoclonal antibodies, such as gemtuzumab, can block cancer growth in different ways. Some find cancer cells and help kill them or carry cancer-killing substances to them. Others interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Gemtuzumab may also stop the growth of promyelocytic leukemia by blocking blood flow to the cancer. Giving gemtuzumab together with combination chemotherapy may be more effective in treating promyelocytic leukemia. PURPOSE: This phase II trial is studying how well giving gemtuzumab together with combination chemotherapy works in treating patients with previously untreated promyelocytic leukemia.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Nini Estevez, (650) 725 - 4041.

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