Bio

Bio


Dr. Das specializes in the treatment of thoracic malignancies. She sees and treats patients both at the Stanford Cancer Center and at the Palo Alto VA Hospital. She is Chief of Oncology at the Palo Alto VA and also leads the VA thoracic tumor board on a biweekly basis. She has a strong interest in clinical research, serving as a principal investigator for multiple clinical and translational studies at the Palo Alto VA, and also as a co-investigator on all of the lung cancer trials at Stanford. In her free time, she enjoys spending time with her family, traveling, and running.

Clinical Focus


  • Thoracic Oncology
  • Medical Oncology

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Chief, Oncology, VA Palo Alto Health Care System (2015 - Present)
  • Associate Program Director, Oncology Fellowship, Stanford University (2015 - Present)

Boards, Advisory Committees, Professional Organizations


  • Member, International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) (2009 - Present)
  • Member, American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) (2008 - Present)

Professional Education


  • Board Certification: Medical Oncology, American Board of Internal Medicine (2011)
  • Board Certification: Internal Medicine, American Board of Internal Medicine (2007)
  • Residency:Stanford University Hospital -Clinical Excellence Research Center (2007) CA
  • Internship:Stanford University Hospital -Clinical Excellence Research Center (2005) CA
  • Medical Education:University of Massachusetts Medical Center (2004) MA
  • Fellowship:Stanford University School of Medicine (2001) CA

Research & Scholarship

Clinical Trials


  • MAGE A10????T for Advanced NSCLC Recruiting

    This first time in human study is intended for men and women at least 18 years of age who have advanced lung cancer which has grown or returned after being treated. In particular, it is a study for subjects who have a blood test positive for HLA-A*02:01 and/or HLA-A*02:06 and a tumor test positive for MAGE A10 protein expression (protein or gene). The study will take the subject's T cells, which are a natural type of immune cell in the blood, and send them to a laboratory to be modified. The changed T cells used in this study will be the subject's own T cells that have been genetically changed with the aim of attacking and destroying cancer cells. The manufacturing of T cells takes about 1 month to complete. The T cells will be given back to the subject through an intravenous infusion. The purpose of this study is to test the safety of genetically changed T cells and find out what effects, if any, they have in subjects with lung cancer. The study will evaluate three different cell dose levels in order to find out the target cell dose. Once the target cell dose is determined, additional subjects will be enrolled to further test the safety and effects at this cell dose. Subjects will be seen frequently by the Study Physician right after receiving their T cells back and up to first 6 months. After that, subjects will be seen every three months. If subjects have disease progression or withdraw from the study, they will then be entered into a long-term follow up for safety monitoring. Subjects will be seen every 6 months by their Study Physician for the first 5 years after the T cell infusion. If the T cells are found in the blood at five years, then the subjects will continue to be seen once a year until the T cells are no longer found in the blood for a maximum of 15 years. If the T cells are no longer found in the blood at 5 years, then the subject will be contacted by the Study Physician for the next 10 years.

    View full details

  • Safety, Pharmacokinetic and Preliminary Efficacy Study of AC0010MA in Advanced Non Small Cell Lung Cancer Recruiting

    AC0010MA is a new, irreversible, Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) mutation selective Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor. Aim at local advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer patients with EGFR mutation or T790M drug-resistant mutation. The molecular mechanism: by irreversible combining the EGFR-RTKs ATP binding site of cell, selectively suppress the activities of EGFR tyrosine kinase phosphorylation, block the signal transduction pathway of EGFR and inhibit the function of ras/raf/MAPK downstream, thus block the tumor cell growth by EGFR induction, and promotes apoptosis. AC0010MA Maleate Capsules has three characters: 1. Irreversible binding to EGFR; 2. Effectively suppresses the tumor cell with EGFR mutant while has no suppression to EGFR wild-type cell; 3. Efficient suppress the tumor cell with EGFR T790M drug-resistant mutation.

    View full details

  • Cisplatin and Etoposide With or Without Veliparib in Treating Patients With Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer or Metastatic Large Cell Neuroendocrine Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Not Recruiting

    This randomized phase I/II trial studies the side effects and best dose of veliparib when given together with or without cisplatin and etoposide and to see how well they work in treating patients with extensive stage small cell lung cancer or large cell neuroendocrine non-small cell lung cancer that has spread to other parts of the body. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin and etoposide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Veliparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving cisplatin and etoposide with or without veliparib may work better in treating patients with extensive stage small cell lung cancer or metastatic large cell neuroendocrine non-small cell lung cancer.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Maria Pitsiouni, 650-721-6977.

    View full details

  • Phase II Etirinotecan Pegol in Refractory Brain Metastases & Advanced Lung Cancer / Metastatic Breast Cancer Recruiting

    This phase II trial studies how well pegylated irinotecan NKTR 102 works in treating patients with non-small cell lung cancer, small cell lung cancer, or breast cancer that has spread to the brain and does not respond to treatment. Pegylated irinotecan NKTR 102 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

    View full details

  • Expanded Treatment Protocol With LDK378 in ALK(+) NSCLC Not Recruiting

    Novartis-sponsored, open-label, multi-center, interventional ETP to provide LDK378 to patients with ALK (+)NSCLC, who have been pre-treated with an ALK inhibitor; except in countries where ALK inhibitors are not approved or available. The protocol will further evaluate the safety of LDK378 in patients with ALK(+) NSCLC.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Melanie San Pedro-Salcedo, 650-724-1388.

    View full details

  • Erlotinib Hydrochloride or Crizotinib and Chemoradiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Not Recruiting

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well erlotinib hydrochloride or crizotinib with chemoradiation therapy works in treating patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer. Radiation therapy uses high energy x rays to kill tumor cells. Specialized radiation therapy that delivers a high dose of radiation directly to the tumor may kill more tumor cells and cause less damage to normal tissue. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, etoposide, paclitaxel, and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether giving erlotinib hydrochloride is more effective than crizotinib with chemoradiation therapy in treating patients with non-small cell lung cancer.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Katie Brown, 650-723-1423.

    View full details

  • Pembrolizumab in Patients With Metastatic Non-squamous Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Recruiting

    This phase II trial studies how well pembrolizumab works in treating patients with non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer which has spread to other places in the body. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.

    View full details

  • A Phase 1/2 Study to Evaluate MEDI4736 Not Recruiting

    This is a multicenter, open-label, first-time-in-human study with a standard 3+3 dose-escalation phase in subjects with advanced solid tumors followed by an expansion phase in patients with advanced solid tumors. An exploration cohort has been added to determine the safety using Q4W dosing.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Melanie San Pedro-Salcedo, 650-724-1388.

    View full details

  • An Open-Label, Randomized, Phase 3 Trial of Nivolumab Versus Investigator's Choice Chemotherapy as First-Line Therapy for Stage IV or Recurrent PD-L1+ Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (CheckMate 026) Not Recruiting

    The purpose of this study is to show that Nivolumab will improve progression free survival in subjects with strongly Stage IV or Recurrent PD-L1+ non-small cell lung cancer when compared to chemotherapy

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Smriti Rai, 650-723-0270.

    View full details

  • Phase 1/2 Study of X-396, an Oral ALK Inhibitor, in Patients With ALK-positive Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Recruiting

    This is the first human study to use X-396 (ensartinib), a drug being developed for treatment of advanced cancers. The initial purpose of the study is to determine the largest amount of X-396 that can be safely given to humans (the maximum tolerated dose). Once the recommended Phase 2 dose has been determined, an expansion phase will assess the preliminary anti-tumor activity of X-396 in ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer. The study will also provide early information on how the body handles the drug (pharmacokinetics) and on the efficacy of X-396.

    View full details

  • A Multi-Center Study of Ibrutinib in Combination With MEDI4736 in Subjects With Relapsed or Refractory Solid Tumors Not Recruiting

    This is a Phase 1b/2, multi-center study to assess the safety and efficacy of ibrutinib in combination with durvalumab (MEDI4736) in subjects with relapsed or refractory solid tumors.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Cancer Clinical Trials Office (CCTO), 650-498-7061.

    View full details

  • Safety and Efficacy Study of Abraxane as Maintenance Treatment After Abraxane Plus Carboplatin in 1st Line Stage IIIB / IV Squamous Cell Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Not Recruiting

    Maintenance treatment of advanced stage squamous cell NSCLC

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Cancer Clinical Trials Office (CCTO), 650-498-7061.

    View full details

  • Study to Assess Safety and Efficacy of Atezolizumab (MPDL3280A) Compared to Best Supportive Care Following Chemotherapy in Patients With Lung Cancer [IMpower010] Recruiting

    This is a Phase III, global, multicenter, open-label, randomized study to compare the efficacy and safety of 16 cycles (1 cycle duration=21 days) of atezolizumab (MPDL3280A) treatment compared with best supportive care (BSC) in participants with Stage IB-Stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) following resection and adjuvant chemotherapy, as measured by disease-free survival (DFS) as assessed by the investigator and overall survival (OS). Participants, after completing up to 4 cycles of adjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy, will be randomized in a 1:1 ratio to receive atezolizumab for 16 cycles or BSC.

    View full details

  • Screening Protocol for Tumor Antigen Expression Profiling and HLA Typing for Eligibility Determination Recruiting

    This screening study is intended for men and women at least 18 years of age who have advanced solid or hematologic malignancy. The study will assess a subject's human leukocyte antigen (HLA) subtype and tumor antigen expression profile. Based on the results, it will be determined if a subject is eligible to be considered for Adaptimmune sponsored clinical trials testing the safety and efficacy of genetically changed T cells targeting specific tumor antigens. No treatment intervention will occur as part of this screening study. Upon enrollment, subjects will be required to provide a blood sample for HLA subtype analysis. If the results of the analysis match the HLA-A subtypes noted in the inclusion criteria and do not express the HLA subtypes that are exclusionary for the available interventional clinical trial(s), then the subject will be required to provide either an archival tumor specimen or fresh tumor tissue biopsy. The tumor specimen will be screened at a central laboratory for the expression (protein or gene) of multiple antigens which may include, but are not limited to NY-ESO-1 and/or LAGE-1a and MAGE A10. Based upon the results of these diagnostic analyses, if eligible, subjects will be referred to an appropriate available interventional clinical trial(s) at the discretion of the Investigator. Following screening, tumor samples will be retained by Adaptimmune for the purpose of developing and validating in vitro diagnostic (IVD) assay(s) for antigen expression profiling which is required for regulatory approval of a new therapeutic product indication.

    View full details

  • A Study of Atezolizumab in Participants With Programmed Death - Ligand 1 (PD-L1) Positive Locally Advanced or Metastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Not Recruiting

    This multicenter, single-arm study will evaluate the efficacy and safety of Atezolizumab in participants with PD-L1-positive locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Participants will receive Atezolizumab 1200 milligrams (mg) intravenously every 3 weeks as long as participants are experiencing clinical benefit as assessed by the investigator, that is , in the absence of unacceptable toxicity or symptomatic deterioration attributed to disease progression.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Lisa Zhou, 650-736-4112.

    View full details

  • Osimertinib and Necitumumab in Treating Patients With EGFR-Mutant Stage IV or Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Who Have Progressed on a Previous EGFR Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Recruiting

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of necitumumab when given together with osimertinib in treating patients with EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancer that is stage IV or has come back (recurrent) and who have progressed on a previous EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Monoclonal antibodies, such as necitumumab, may block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Osimertinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving necitumumab with osimertinib may be a better treatment for EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancer.

    View full details

  • A Phase II Study to Evaluate the Efficacy and Safety of Oral Ceritinib in Patients With ALK-positive NSCLC Metastatic to the Brain and/or to Leptomeninges Recruiting

    This is a phase II, multi-center, open-label, five-arm study in which the efficacy and safety of oral ceritinib treatment will be assessed in patients with NSCLC metastatic to the brain and/or to leptomeninges harboring a confirmed ALK rearrangement, using the FDA approved Vysis ALK Break Apart FISH Probe Kit (Abbott Molecular Inc.) test and scoring algorithm (including positivity criteria). If documentation of ALK rearrangement as described above is not locally available, a test to confirm ALK rearrangement must be performed by a Novartis designated central laboratory. Patients must wait for the central laboratory result of the ALK rearrangement status before initiating treatment with ceritinib.

    View full details

Publications

All Publications


  • ERBB2-Mutated Metastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Response and Resistance to Targeted Therapies. Journal of thoracic oncology Chuang, J. C., Stehr, H., Liang, Y., Das, M., Huang, J., Diehn, M., Wakelee, H. A., Neal, J. W. 2017

    Abstract

    Erb-b2 receptor tyrosine kinase 2 gene (ERBB2) (also called HER2) has long been recognized as an oncogenic driver in some breast and gastroesophageal cancers in which amplification of this gene confers sensitivity to treatment with Erb-b2 receptor tyrosine kinase 2 (ERBB2)-directed agents. More recently, somatic mutations in ERBB2 have been reported in 1% to 2% of patients with lung adenocarcinoma. Previous case series have suggested clinical tumor responses using anti-ERBB2 small molecules and antibody therapies.Here we report the outcomes of nine patients with metastatic lung adenocarcinoma with ERBB2 mutations being treated with ERBB2-targeted therapies.Four of the nine patients had response to targeted therapies, with durations of response ranging from 3 to 10 months. We identified a de novo phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase catalytic subunit alpha gene (PIK3CA) mutation and ERBB2 copy number gain as potential resistance mechanisms.We showed patients with ERBB2-mutated lung adenocarcinoma can respond to targeted therapies, and we identified potential resistance mechanisms upon progression to targeted therapies.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jtho.2017.01.023

    View details for PubMedID 28167203

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC5402884

  • Dovitinib and erlotinib in patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer: A drug-drug interaction LUNG CANCER Das, M., Padda, S. K., Frymoyer, A., Zhou, L., Riess, J. W., Neal, J. W., Wakelee, H. A. 2015; 89 (3): 280-286

    Abstract

    Erlotinib is a FDA approved small molecule inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor and dovitinib is a novel small molecule inhibitor of fibroblast growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor. This phase 1 trial was conducted to characterize the safety and determine the maximum tolerated dose of erlotinib plus dovitinib in patients with previously treated metastatic non-small cell lung cancer.Escalating dose cohorts of daily erlotinib and dovitinib dosed 5 days on/2 days off, starting after a 2-week lead-in of erlotinib alone, were planned. A potential pharmacokinetic interaction was hypothesized as dovitinib induces CYP1A1/1A2. Only cohort 1 (150mg erlotinib+300mg dovitinib) and cohort -1 (150mg erlotinib+200mg dovitinib) enrolled. Plasma concentrations of erlotinib were measured pre- and post-dovitinib exposure.Two of three patients in cohort 1 had a DLT (grade 3 transaminitis and grade 3 syncope). Two of 6 patients in cohort -1 had a DLT (grade 3 pulmonary embolism and grade 3 fatigue); thus, the study was terminated. Erlotinib exposure (average Cmax 2308±698ng/ml and AUC 0-24 41,030±15,577 ng×h/ml) approximated previous reports in the six patients with pharmacokinetic analysis. However, erlotinib Cmax and AUC0-24 decreased significantly by 93% (p=0.02) and 97% (p<0.01), respectively, during dovitinib co-administration.This small study demonstrated considerable toxicity and a significant pharmacokinetic interaction with a marked decrease in erlotinib exposure in the presence of dovitinib, likely mediated through CYP1A1/1A2 induction. Given the toxicity and the pharmacokinetic interaction, further investigation with this drug combination will not be pursued.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.lungcan.2015.06.011

    View details for Web of Science ID 000360513200010

  • Angiogenesis and lung cancer: ramucirumab prolongs survival in 2(nd)-line metastatic NSCLC. Translational lung cancer research Das, M., Wakelee, H. 2014; 3 (6): 397-399

    Abstract

    In the REVEL trial, ramucirumab, a monoclonal antibody to VEGFR-2, improved overall survival in combination with docetaxel compared to docetaxel alone in the second-line setting of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Along with bevacizumab and nintedanib, ramucirumab is the third anti-angiogenic agent that has yielded positive overall survival results in a phase III trial of patients with advanced NSCLC. Given the lack of effective therapies in the relapsed setting and the disappointing results of many other VEGF-targeted agents in lung cancer, the results from REVEL are encouraging. One of the major remaining hurdles is the identification of reliable predictive biomarkers in order to predict which patients are most likely to benefit from anti-angiogenic therapies. Despite the positive results seen in REVEL, the exact role of ramucirumab in the treatment paradigm of lung cancer remains to be seen given the modest survival benefit of 1.4 months and the lack of predictive biomarkers at this time.

    View details for DOI 10.3978/j.issn.2218-6751.2014.09.05

    View details for PubMedID 25806332

  • A Case Series of Lengthy Progression-Free Survival With Pemetrexed-Containing Therapy in Metastatic Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients Harboring ROS1 Gene Rearrangements. Clinical lung cancer Riess, J. W., Padda, S. K., Bangs, C. D., Das, M., Neal, J. W., Adrouny, A. R., Cherry, A., Wakelee, H. A. 2013; 14 (5): 592-595

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.cllc.2013.04.008

    View details for PubMedID 23810364

  • A Case Series of NSCLC Patients with Different Molecular Characteristics and Choroidal Metastases Improvement in Vision with Treatment Including Pemetrexed and Bevacizumab JOURNAL OF THORACIC ONCOLOGY Riess, J. W., Nagpal, S., Das, M., Neal, J. W., Kim, J. W., Wakelee, H. A. 2013; 8 (2): E17-E18

    View details for DOI 10.1097/JTO.0b013e31827690da

    View details for Web of Science ID 000316204900003

    View details for PubMedID 23328555

  • Anti-angiogenic agents in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC): a perspective on the MONET1 (Motesanib NSCLC Efficacy and Tolerability) study JOURNAL OF THORACIC DISEASE Das, M., Wakelee, H. 2012; 4 (6): 558-561
  • Angiogenesis inhibitors. Journal of thoracic oncology Das, M., Wakelee, H. 2012; 7 (16): S397-8

    View details for DOI 10.1097/JTO.0b013e31826df227

    View details for PubMedID 23160332

  • ERCC1 expression in circulating tumor cells (CTCs) using a novel detection platform correlates with progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) receiving platinum chemotherapy. Lung cancer Das, M., Riess, J. W., Frankel, P., Schwartz, E., Bennis, R., Hsieh, H. B., Liu, X., Ly, J. C., Zhou, L., Nieva, J. J., Wakelee, H. A., Bruce, R. H. 2012; 77 (2): 421-426

    Abstract

    To utilize a novel circulating tumor cell (CTC) technology to quantify ERCC1 expression on CTCs and determine whether ERCC1 expression levels predict efficacy of platinum-based chemotherapy in patients with metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC).ERCC1 expression was measured in 17 metastatic NSCLC patients who received platinum-based therapy and had ?2 intact CTCs with acceptable ERCC1 expression assay results. ERCC1 levels were determined from average expression on individual CTCs in each sample. Progression-free survival (PFS) was calculated from the date of therapy initiation.PFS decreased with increasing ERCC1 expression (p<0.04, F-test, linear regression). Lack of ERCC1 expression was associated with longer PFS (266 days versus 172 days, log-rank, p<0.02) in a Kaplan-Meier analysis using ERCC expression level of 1 as a cutoff (range 0-30). The difference in survival was statistically significant with a hazard ratio of 4.20 (95% CI 1.25-14.1, p<0.02, log-rank). PFS was also observed to decrease with increased cytokeratin (CK) expression (p<0.01 long-rank (Cox regression) and F-test (linear regression)). The hazard ratio is 4.38 (95% CI 1.76-10.9) for each log-change in CK value until progression was noted on imaging.Low expression of ERCC1 on CTCs correlates with PFS in patients with metastatic NSCLC receiving platinum-based therapy.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.lungcan.2012.04.005

    View details for PubMedID 22555222

  • ERCC1 expression in circulating tumor cells (CTCs) using a novel detection platform correlates with progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) receiving platinum chemotherapy LUNG CANCER Das, M., Riess, J. W., Frankel, P., Schwartz, E., Bennis, R., Ben Hsieh, H., Liu, X., Ly, J. C., Zhou, L., Nieva, J. J., Wakelee, H. A., Bruce, R. H. 2012; 77 (2): 421-426
  • Angiogenesis Inhibitors JOURNAL OF THORACIC ONCOLOGY Das, M., Wakelee, H. 2011; 6 (11): S1801-S1802
  • Results from a Single Institution Phase II Trial of Concurrent Docetaxel/Carboplatin/Radiotherapy Followed by Surgical Resection and Consolidation Docetaxel/Carboplatin in Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer CLINICAL LUNG CANCER Das, M., Donington, J. S., Murphy, J., Kozak, M., Eclov, N., Whyte, R. I., Hoang, C. D., Zhou, L., Le, Q., Loo, B. W., Wakelee, H. 2011; 12 (5): 280-285

    Abstract

    The optimal treatment of locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains controversial. We hypothesized that using a trimodality approach in selected patients with stage IIIA/IIIB disease would be both feasible and efficacious with reasonable toxicity.We enrolled 13 patients with resectable stage III NSCLC on a prospective phase II trial of trimodality therapy. Induction treatment consisted of weekly docetaxel 20 mg/m(2) and weekly carboplatin at an area under curve (AUC) of 2 concurrent with 45 Gy thoracic radiotherapy. Resection was performed unless felt to be unsafe or if patients had progressive disease. Postoperative consolidation consisted of docetaxel 75 mg/m(2) and carboplatin at an AUC of 6 every 3 weeks for 3 cycles with growth factor support.All patients responded to induction chemoradiotherapy as measured by total gross tumor volume reductions of 43% on average (range, 27%-64%). Twelve patients underwent resection of the tumor and involved nodes, yielding a resectability rate of 92%. The primary endpoint of 2-year overall survival (OS) was 72% (95% confidence interval [CI], 36%-90%), and 2-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 36% (95% CI, 9%-64%). The maximal toxicity observed per patient was grade II in 5 patients (38%); grade III in 7 patients (54%); grade IV in 1 patient (8%); and grade V in none.This trimodality approach resulted in promising outcomes with reasonable toxicity in carefully selected patients with stage III NSCLC at a single institution.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.cllc.2011.06.003

    View details for Web of Science ID 000294600800003

    View details for PubMedID 21752720

  • Vascular Disrupting Agents JOURNAL OF THORACIC ONCOLOGY Das, M., Wakelee, H. 2010; 5 (12): S482-S483

    View details for Web of Science ID 000284994000016

    View details for PubMedID 21102249

  • Alternatives to Surgery for Early Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer-Ready for Prime Time? CURRENT TREATMENT OPTIONS IN ONCOLOGY Das, M., Abdelmaksoud, M. H., Loo, B. W., Kothary, N. 2010; 11 (1-2): 24-35

    Abstract

    Surgery is the standard of care for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), with lobectomy being the most oncologically sound resection. Medically inoperable patients and high-risk surgical candidates require effective alternatives to surgery; even operable patients may opt for less invasive options if they are proven to achieve similar outcomes to surgery. Minimally invasive local treatment modalities including dose-intensified conformal radiation therapy, most notably stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR; also known as stereotactic body radiation therapy), and thermal ablation methods such as radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and microwave ablation (MWA) are emerging as promising treatment options whose roles in the treatment of early stage lung cancer are being defined. Early clinical experience and a rapidly growing body of prospective clinical trials, primarily in medically inoperable patients, are demonstrating encouraging effectiveness and safety outcomes in some cases approaching historical results with surgery. Given the very poor prognosis of the medically inoperable patient population, these alternatives to surgery, particularly SABR, are starting to be considered appropriate first-line therapy in properly selected patients, and prospective cooperative group trials to evaluate and optimize RFA and SABR in specific patient subsets are being conducted. For operable patients, prospective multi-center and cooperative groups trials of SABR are ongoing or completed, and international randomized trials of SABR vs. surgery have been initiated. Thus, promising alternatives to surgery for early stage NSCLC are ready for prime time evaluation in the setting of clinical trials, and participation in ongoing trials for both operable and medically inoperable patients is strongly encouraged.

    View details for DOI 10.1007/s11864-010-0119-z

    View details for Web of Science ID 000281247200003

    View details for PubMedID 20577833

Footer Links:

Stanford Medicine Resources: