Bio

Clinical Focus


  • Internal Medicine

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Medical Director, D&E Ground Nursing Units, Stanford University Medical Center (2006 - Present)
  • Hospitalist, Division of GIM, Stanford University (1999 - Present)

Honors & Awards


  • Award for Service and Leadership, Omega Chi Epsilon (1989)
  • Purdue Outstanding Chemical Engineering Senior, Purdue University (1989)
  • Purdue Alumni Foundation Award, Purdue University (1989)
  • Most Outstanding Senior Women in Engineering, Purdue University (1989)
  • Fellowship, DuPont Fellowship in Chemical Engineering (1989)
  • Fellowship, Tau Beta Pi Engineering Fellowship (1989)
  • Fellowship, National Science Foundation Fellowship (1989-1992)

Professional Education


  • Residency:Stanford University Medical Center (1999) CA
  • Medical Education:Harvard Medical School (1996) MA
  • Board Certification: Internal Medicine, American Board of Internal Medicine (1999)
  • Internship:Stanford University Medical Center (1997) CA
  • Residency, Stanford Univ Medical Center, Internal Medicine (1999)
  • MD, Harvard University, Medicine (1996)
  • PhD, MIT, Medical Engineering (1995)
  • BS, Purdue University, Chemical Engineering (1989)

Teaching

2013-14 Courses


Publications

Journal Articles


  • Teaching evidence-based medicine on a busy hospitalist service: Residents rate a pilot curriculum ACADEMIC MEDICINE Nicholson, L. J., Shieh, L. Y. 2005; 80 (6): 607-609

    Abstract

    To increase evidence-based medicine (EBM) instruction within the confines of reduced resident work hours.In 2001-02, the authors designed and implemented an EBM curriculum for residents on an inpatient medicine service at Stanford University Medical Center. Thirty-six residents were assigned the hospitalist rotation in its pilot year. Attendings introduced EBM concepts and Internet resources. During daily rounds, housestaff presented patient-based EBM literature search results. After the rotation, residents were given a questionnaire on which they were asked to rate the impact of the curriculum on their understanding of 20 EBM terms or practice skills (1 = no effect to 5 = strong effect).Twenty-three residents (64%) completed the questionnaire. The results were very positive with average effect of more than 4 (somewhat strong effect/impact) for 16 of the 20 questions. High-speed Internet access and EBM Web resources were critical to efficient delivery of the curriculum during inpatient care.The pilot curriculum successfully introduced the practice of EBM during active inpatient care without requiring additional hours from housestaff schedules. To further evaluate and expand this project, EBM skills will be tested before and after the rotation, and faculty development will allow consistent delivery in additional clinical settings.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000229386300016

    View details for PubMedID 15917368

  • EROSION OF A NEW FAMILY OF BIODEGRADABLE POLYANHYDRIDES JOURNAL OF BIOMEDICAL MATERIALS RESEARCH Shieh, L., Tamada, J., Chen, I., Pang, J., Domb, A., Langer, R. 1994; 28 (12): 1465-1475

    Abstract

    Studies investigating the erosion mechanism of the newly developed poly (fatty acid dimer: sebacic acid) polyanhydride (p:[FAD:SA]) are described. The overall erosion of different monomer compositions of p(FAD:SA) copolymers was examined to determine whether and to what extent copolymer properties affected polymer erosion. Increasing the hydrophobic monomer (FAD) content up to 50 wt% in the copolymer resulted in longer erosion, whereas further increases up to 70 wt% decreased the erosion period. Polymer crystallinity depended on copolymer FAD content. Copolymer degradation was studied by examining anhydride bond hydrolysis using infrared spectroscopy. Much faster hydrolysis was found in p(FAD:SA) 70:30 compared with more crystalline copolymers of higher SA content. Light microscopy indicates the presence of an erosion zone, a distinct area where mass loss occurs. This erosion zone moves from the outside toward the interior of the polymer matrix. It plays an important role in erosion because any water or monomer must diffuse through this eroded layer.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1994PU33100011

    View details for PubMedID 7876286

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