Bio

Bio


Dr. Weinlander is a Clinical Professor in the Department of Medicine, Division of Primary Care and Population Health. She is a seasoned family medicine physician with a passion for high quality primary care, medical education, primary care research and health care professional wellness.

She completed her medical training in Canada, medical school at Queens university and residency at McGill. She has long standing academic interests in patient and clinician wellness, women?s health and medical education. For the last 15 years she has been the Director for the Continuity of Care clerkship, recently transition to a new role as Director of Faculty Wellness for Primary Care and Population Health. She is co-founder and director of Stanford-CSI (Clinical Summer Internship) for premed undergrad and upper level high school students. She runs the annual McGann Women and Health Lecture Series which is open to medical students and undergrads for credit and to the general public.

Dr. Weinlander practices the full spectrum of primary care, from pediatrics to geriatrics. She also leads collaborative mind-body medicine skills visits for patients grappling with chronic disease and stressful lives, or who just want to explore the healing properties of these practices. She is LGBTQQI friendly. Speaks French and a tiny bit of German.

Clinical Focus


  • Family Medicine
  • Mind Body Medicine

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Lecturer, Preceptor, SPE examiner, Family and Community Medicine 301A (1995 - Present)
  • Clerkship Director, Continuity of Care Clerkship 310A (2004 - 2017)
  • Clerkship Director/Co- Facilitator, Mind Body Medicine 219A (2006 - Present)
  • Clerkship Director, Medical Scientist Training Program-Continuity 311 (2011 - 2017)
  • Co-Founder and Director, Stanford CSI -Clinical Summer Internship (2015 - Present)
  • Director of Faculty Wellness, Division of Primary Care and Population Health, Stanford University School of Medicine (2017 - Present)

Honors & Awards


  • Ivan Smith Scholarship, Kingston Regional Cancer Clinic (1985)
  • Queen's University Medical School-Div. of Neuropathology, Medical Research Council of Canada Grant (1984)
  • Best Doctor-Family and Community Medicine, Best Doctors in America (2002-present)
  • Excellence in Teaching Award, Stanford Family and Community Medicine (2002)
  • Top Doctor: Family Medicine, Top Doctors in America (2007-present)
  • Excellence in Clinical Teaching, Stanford University (2008)
  • Kaiser Award for Excellence in Teaching, Stanford University Medical School (2011)

Boards, Advisory Committees, Professional Organizations


  • Committee member, Stanford Wellness Committee (2014 - Present)
  • Faculty, Center for Mind Body Medicine www.CMBM.org (2014 - Present)

Professional Education


  • Residency:McGill University Graduate Medical Education (1990) Canada
  • Internship:McGill University Graduate Medical Education (1988) Canada
  • Medical Education:Queen's University (1987) Canada
  • Residency:Queen's University (1989) Canada
  • MD, Queens University Medical School, Medicine (1987)
  • BA-Biology, Queen's University, Biology (1983)

Research & Scholarship

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


Women's Health
Mind Body Medicine
Chronic Disease Management

Projects


  • Mind Body Medicine Collaborative Patient Visits, Stanford University

    Recurrent 8 week collaborative visit sessions exploring Mind-Body Medicine research and techniques

    Location

    Hoover Pavilion, Stanford, CA

Teaching

2017-18 Courses


Publications

All Publications


  • Rethinking empathy decline: results from an OSCE. The clinical teacher Teng, V. C., Nguyen, C., Hall, K. T., Rydel, T., Sattler, A., Schillinger, E., Weinlander, E., Lin, S. 2017

    Abstract

    The phenomenon of empathy decline among medical students during training is widely accepted, with evidence based largely on studies using self-administered instruments. Recently, researchers have called into question this phenomenon, in light of new findings that suggest a discrepancy between self-administered empathy scores and observed empathic behaviours: for example, during objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs). Our objective was to compare observed empathy among medical students in different clerkship years using an OSCE.Participants were medical students in their first or second year of clinical clerkships, enrolled in a required family medicine clerkship at Stanford University. Participants completed an OSCE that was directly observed by trained faculty staff, who used the Measure of Patient-Centered Communication (MPCC) instrument to measure empathic behaviours. Statistics were used to determine correlations between observed empathy and the students' year of clerkship, gender, and specialty preference.A total of 129 medical students, evenly divided by gender and clerkship year, participated. There was a possible trend towards higher MPCC scores among students in their second clerkship year compared with students in their first year (p = 0.09), which became more significant when adjusted for outlier effects (p = 0.05). There was no difference in performance by gender. Students interested in a 'people-oriented' specialty scored higher in 'handling the patient's frustration' compared with those who are interested in a 'technology-oriented' specialty.In our study, observed empathic behaviours were not lower in the second compared with the first year of clerkship training. More research is warranted to investigate the apparent discrepancy between self-administered empathy scores and observed empathic behaviours. New findings suggest a discrepancy between self-administered empathy scores and observed empathic behaviours.

    View details for DOI 10.1111/tct.12608

    View details for PubMedID 28164429

  • Rickets: A Case Study Canadian Journal of Family Practice Weinlander, E.E., Klein, M 1991

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