School of Medicine


Showing 41-50 of 51 Results

  • Robert W. Shafer

    Robert W. Shafer

    Professor (Research) of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and, by courtesy, of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My group?s research is on the mechanisms and consequences of virus evolution with a focus on HIV therapy and drug resistance. We maintain a public HIV drug resistance database (http://hivdb.stanford.edu) as a resource for HIV drug resistance surveillance, interpreting HIV drug resistance tests, and HIV drug development. Our paramount goal is to inform HIV treatment and prevention policies by identifying the main factors responsible for the emergence and spread of drug resistance.

  • Upinder Singh

    Upinder Singh

    Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases & Geographic Medicine) and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our lab elucidates the molecular basis of pathogenesis of the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. We use genetic and genomic approaches to identify novel virulence determinants and to characterize the global epidemiology of the parasite.

  • David A. Stevens

    David A. Stevens

    Professor of Medicine, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Immunology and chemotherapy of human fungal diseases, particularly coccidioidomycosis (Valley Fever) in California and aspergillosis.

  • Aruna Subramanian

    Aruna Subramanian

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Infectious Diseases

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research and scholarly interests have focused on tailoring antimicrobial prophylaxis in specific highly immunocompromised hosts depending on their specific infectious disease risks. I am interested in developing diagnostic algorithms and treatment protocols that will improve the quality of care in transplant and oncology patients.

    I also have an interest in training ID fellows in this very specialized area of patient care. To that end, we have started a new ICHS ID fellowship with a specialized curriculum and are developing supplemental educational materials to enhance this training, which can be implemented at other academic training centers.

  • Susanna Tan

    Susanna Tan

    Instructor, Medicine - Infectious Diseases

    Bio Dr. Tan's research focuses on translating novel diagnostics for infections in transplantation, with emphasis on next-generation sequencing methods as applied to immunocompromised hosts. She studies viral infections in solid organ and hematopoietic cell transplant recipients, particularly polyomaviruses.

  • Lucy Tompkins

    Lucy Tompkins

    Lucy Becker Professor in Medicine and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Genetic and cellular basis of pathogenicity of Helicobacter pylori. Molecular epidemiology, hospital epidemiology, quality improvement in healthcare associated infections.

  • Taia T Wang

    Taia T Wang

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Studies in our lab are driven by the hypothesis that IgG repertoire diversity is a central driver of heterogeneity in human immune functioning and susceptibility to diseases. We are specifically interested in diversity that exists in the Fc domain repertoire among people, which we define by serum IgG subclass and Fc glycoform distributions. We have found that the Fc domain repertoire of an individual impacts key immune processes such as vaccine responses and susceptibility to antibody-dependent enhancement of dengue disease (Wang TT, Cell. 2015 and Wang TT, Science. 2017). This is because IgG subclasses and Fc glycoforms dictate the structure of Fc domains within immune complexes that form during vaccination or infection. This, in turn, determines the affinity of immune complexes for various Fc receptors on effector cells. Thus, our research seeks to define how the Fc domain repertoire of an individual determines the quality of effector cell responses that can be recruited during immune activation.

    We are particularly interested in training students and postdocs who will go on to be independent investigators in mechanistic studies relevant to human disease.


    Current clinical studies:
    Recruiting:

    An Open Label Study of IgG Fc Glycan Composition in Human Immunity
    Principal Investigator: Taia T. Wang, MD, PhD
    ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
    NCT01967238

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