Bio

Clinical Focus


  • Tropical Medicine
  • Travel Medicine
  • Infectious Disease
  • Parasitology
  • Global health
  • Internal Medicine

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Fellowship Program Director, Stanford University Division of Infectious Diseases & Geographic Medicine (2014 - Present)
  • Director, Scholarly Concentration in Global Health, Stanford University School of Medicine (2010 - Present)
  • Affiliated Faculty Member, Stanford Univ. Woods Institute for the Environment (2009 - Present)
  • Affiliated Faculty Member, Stanford Center for African Studies (2006 - Present)
  • Committee member, Stanford Pharmacy and Therapeutics Antibiotic Subcommittee (2005 - Present)
  • Member, Stanford Infectious Diseases Fellowship Selection Panel (2005 - Present)
  • Associate Chief for Clinical Affairs, Stanford Univ Division of Infectious Diseases (2008 - 2011)
  • Committee member, Stanford Internal Medicine Residency Review Commitee (2005 - 2010)
  • Committee member, Stanford Internal Medicine Intern Selection Committee (2005 - 2009)
  • Comittee member, Stanford Quality Initiative on Sepsis (2008 - 2009)
  • Committee member, Stanford Surgical Care Improvement Project (2007 - 2007)

Honors & Awards


  • Vosti Award - Excellence in Teaching, Stanford Division of Infectious Diseases & Geographic Medicine (2013, 2012, 2010, and 2007)
  • Infectious Diseases Division Teaching Award, Stanford University Department of Internal Medicine (2013, 2012, 2010, and 2007)
  • Dean's Award for Excellence in Teaching, Stanford School of Medicine (2008)
  • Distinguished Service to Housestaff Education, Stanford Dept of Medicine, Chief Residents (2008)
  • Exceptional Preceptor Award, Ambulatory Medicine Clerkship, Stanford University Dept of Medicine (2007)
  • Amstrong Award - Excellence in Patient Care, Stanford Dept of Medicine (2000)
  • Chicago Medical School Alumni Association Award, Chicago Medical School (1997)
  • Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Society, AOA chapter - Chicago Medical School (1995)
  • American Society of Clinical Pathologist's Award, ASCP (1995)
  • McGraw-Hill Academic Achievement Award, McGraw-Hill - Chicago Medical School (1994)
  • Graduation with Departmental Honors, UCLA Dept. of Biology (1992)

Professional Education


  • Certificate of Knowledge, American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, Trop Medicine, Travelers Health (2010)
  • EIS, Centers for Disease Control, Epidemiology (2005)
  • Board Certification: Infectious Disease, American Board of Internal Medicine (2002)
  • Board Certification: Internal Medicine, American Board of Internal Medicine (2000)
  • Fellowship, Stanford University, Infectious Diseases (2002)
  • Fellowship:Stanford University Medical Center (2002) CA
  • Residency:Stanford University School of Medicine (2000) CA
  • Internship:Stanford University School of Medicine (1998) CA
  • Internship, Residency, Chief Res, Stanford University, Internal Medicine (Chief Resident 2002-03) (2000)
  • Medical Education (MD), Chicago Medical School, Medicine (1997)
  • Medical Education:Chicago Medical School (1997) IL
  • BS, UCLA, Biology (1992)

Community and International Work


  • Clinical and programmatic work, Dhaka, Bangladesh

    Partnering Organization(s)

    Yale, Johnson & Johnson

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    Yes

  • Research collaboration, Nairobi and Kisumu, Kenya

    Partnering Organization(s)

    CDC

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    Yes

  • Clinical and programmatic work, Monrovia, Liberia

    Partnering Organization(s)

    Yale, Johnson & Johnson

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    Yes

  • Evaluating and Financing ITNs in India, Orissa State, India

    Topic

    Malaria, filariasis, economics

    Partnering Organization(s)

    Duke Univ, Center for Microfinance, BISWA

    Populations Served

    Rural poor of India

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    Yes

  • Integration of insecticide-treated bednet distribution and mass drug administration in Nigeria, Nigeria

    Topic

    Control of vector-borne parasitic diseases in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Partnering Organization(s)

    CDC, The Carter Center

    Populations Served

    Children under 5, pregnant women

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    No

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

  • Schistosomiasis, strongyloidiasis: presumptive treatment among Sudanese Lost Boys and Somali Bantus, Sudan, Kenya, Phoenix

    Topic

    Treatment of parasitic diseases in US refugees and immigrants

    Partnering Organization(s)

    CDC, AZ Dept of Health Services, Maricopa County Dept. of Public Health

    Populations Served

    US refugees and immigrants

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    No

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

Research & Scholarship

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


My interests include parasitology and global health; I've investigated cryptosporidium and angiostrongylus outbreaks; schistosoma/strongyloides seroprevalence in refugees, and the distribution and impact of ITNs for malaria and filariasis prevention in Nigeria and India. I have done clinical and programmatic work at teaching hospitals in Liberia and Bangladesh and have opportunities for research in Bangladesh and Kenya, in collaboration with ICDDR,B and CDC, Kenya

Teaching

2013-14 Courses


Publications

Journal Articles


  • Eosinophilic Meningitis Attributable to Angiostrongylus cantonensis Infection in Hawaii: Clinical Characteristics and Potential Exposures AMERICAN JOURNAL OF TROPICAL MEDICINE AND HYGIENE Hochberg, N. S., Blackburn, B. G., Park, S. Y., Sejvar, J. J., Effler, P. V., Herwaldt, B. L. 2011; 85 (4): 685-690

    Abstract

    The most common infectious cause of eosinophilic meningitis is Angiostrongylus cantonensis, which is transmitted largely by consumption of snails/slugs. We previously identified cases of angiostrongyliasis that occurred in Hawaii from 2001 to 2005; the highest incidence was on the island of Hawaii. We now report symptoms, laboratory parameters, and exposures. Eighteen patients were evaluated; 94% had headache, and 65% had sensory symptoms (paresthesia, hyperesthesia, and/or numbness). These symptoms lasted a median of 17 and 55 days, respectively. Three persons recalled finding a slug in their food/drink. Case-patients on the island of Hawaii were more likely than case-patients on other islands to consume raw homegrown produce in a typical week (89% versus 0%, P < 0.001) and to see snails/slugs on produce (56% versus 0%, P = 0.03). Residents and travelers should be aware of the potential risks of eating uncooked produce in Hawaii, especially if it is from the island of Hawaii and locally grown.

    View details for DOI 10.4269/ajtmh.2011.11-0322

    View details for Web of Science ID 000295898900021

    View details for PubMedID 21976573

  • Antiparasitic Therapy MAYO CLINIC PROCEEDINGS Kappagoda, S., Singh, U., Blackburn, B. G. 2011; 86 (6): 561-583

    Abstract

    Parasitic diseases affect more than 2 billion people globally and cause substantial morbidity and mortality, particularly among the world's poorest people. This overview focuses on the treatment of the major protozoan and helminth infections in humans. Recent developments in antiparasitic therapy include the expansion of artemisinin-based therapies for malaria, new drugs for soil-transmitted helminths and intestinal protozoa, expansion of the indications for antiparasitic drug treatment in patients with Chagas disease, and the use of combination therapy for leishmaniasis and human African trypanosomiasis.

    View details for DOI 10.4065/mcp.2011.0203

    View details for Web of Science ID 000291288400012

    View details for PubMedID 21628620

  • High Prevalence of Wuchereria bancrofti Infection As Detected by Immunochromatographic Card Testing in Five Districts of Orissa, India, Previously Considered to be Non-Endemic Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg Foo PK, Tarozzi A, Mahajan A, Yoong J, Krishnan L, Kopf D, Blackburn BG 2011; 105: 109-14
  • Free Living Amebae. In: Mandell G, Bennett JE, Dolin R, eds., Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases, 7th ed. Koshy A, Blackburn BG, Singh U 2010; 7: 3427-3436
  • Travel Medicine In: Bope ET, Rakel RE, Kellerman RD (eds). Conn's Current Therapy 2010. Chary A, Singh U, Blackburn BG 2010; 62: 155-68
  • Distribution of Eosinophilic Meningitis Cases Attributable to Angiostrongylus cantonensis, Hawaii Emerg Infect Dis Hochberg NS, Park SY, Blackburn BG, Sejvar JJ, Gaynor K, Chung H, Leniek K, Herwaldt BL, Effler PV 2007; 13: 1675-1680
  • High prevalence and presumptive treatment of schistosomiasis and strongyloidiasis among African refugees Clin Infect Dis Blackburn BG*, Posey DL*, Weinberg M, Flagg EW, Ortega L, Wilson M, Secor WE, Sanders-Lewis K, Won K, Maguire JH 2007; 45: 1310-15
  • Successful integration of insecticide-treated bed net distribution with mass drug administration in Central Nigeria AMERICAN JOURNAL OF TROPICAL MEDICINE AND HYGIENE Blackburn, B. G., Eigege, A., Gotau, H., Gerlong, G., Miri, E., Hawley, W. A., Mathieu, E., Richards, F. 2006; 75 (4): 650-655

    Abstract

    In Africa anopheline mosquitoes transmit malaria and lymphatic filariasis (LF); insecticide-treated bed nets significantly reduce transmission of both. Insecticide-treated bed net provision to children under 5 (U5) and pregnant women (PW) is a major goal of malaria control initiatives, but use in Africa remains low because of cost and logistics. We therefore integrated insecticide-treated bed net distribution with the 2004 LF/onchocerciasis mass drug administration (MDA) program in Central Nigeria. Community volunteers distributed 38,600 insecticide-treated bed nets, while simultaneously treating 150,800 persons with ivermectin/albendazole (compared with 135,600 in 2003). This was subsequently assessed with a 30-cluster survey. Among surveyed households containing U5/PW, 80% (95% CI, 72-87%) owned > or = 1 insecticide-treated bed net, a 9-fold increase from 2003. This first linkage of insecticide-treated bed net distribution with mass drug administration resulted in substantial improvement in insecticide-treated bed net ownership and usage, without adversely affecting mass drug administration coverage. Such integration allowed two programs to share resources while realizing mutual benefit, and is one model for rapidly improving insecticide-treated bed net coverage objectives.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000241214100013

    View details for PubMedID 17038688

  • West Nile virus encephalitis acquired via liver transplantation and clinical response to intravenous immunoglobulin: case report and review of the literature. Transpl Infect Dis Rhee C, Eaton EF, Concepcion W, Blackburn BG. 2011; 13: 312-7
  • Soil-Transmitted Helminths: Ascaris, Trichuris, and Hookworm Infections In: Selendy J (ed.) Water and Sanitation Related Diseases and the Environment: Challenges, Interventions and Preventive Measures, 1st Ed. Blackburn BG, Barry M 2011: 81-93
  • Parasitic Infections in Cancer Patients: Toxoplasmosis, Strongyloidiasis, and Other Parasites In: Safdar A, ed. Principles and Practice of Cancer Infectious Diseases, Current Clinical Oncology Series. 1st ed. Blackburn BG, Montoya JG 2011; 1: 469-80
  • Commitment Mechanisms and Compliance with Health-Protecting Behavior: Preliminary Evidence from Orissa, India AMERICAN ECONOMIC REVIEW Tarozzi, A., Mahajan, A., Yoong, J., Blackburn, B. 2009; 99 (2): 231-235
  • Review of Travel Medicine, 2nd Ed. Keystone JS, Kozarsky PE, Freedman DO, Nothdurft HO, Connor BA (eds) Clin Infect Dis Barry M, Blackburn BG 2009; 49: 1461
  • Gram Negative Rods, Gram Positive Organisms, and Pneumonia chapters Practical Guide to the Care of the Surgical Patient (in press) Pang PS, Blackburn BG, Eckburg PB 2009; 1st Ed: 92-7, 98-100, 102-5
  • Severe Encephalomyelitis in an Immunocompetent Adult with Chromosomally Integrated Human Herpesvirus 6 and Clinical Response to Treatment with Foscarnet plus Ganciclovir Clin Infect Dis Troy SB, Blackburn BG, Yeom K, Finley Caulfield AK, Bhangoo MS, Montoya JG 2008; 47: e93-6
  • Schistosomiasis Health Information for International Travel 2008 (The Yellow Book) Maguire J, Blackburn B, Montgomery S 2007: 297-301
  • Full recovery from Baylisascaris procyonis eosinophilic meningitis Emerg Infec Dis Pai PJ, Blackburn BG, Kazacos KR, Warrier RP, Begue RE 2007; 13 (6): 928-930
  • Microarray detection of human parainfluenzavirus 4 infection associated with respiratory failure in an immunocompetent adult CLINICAL INFECTIOUS DISEASES Chiu, C. Y., Rouskin, S., Koshy, A., Urisman, A., Fischer, K., Yagi, S., Schnurr, D., Eckburg, P. B., Tompkins, L. S., Blackburn, B. G., Merker, J. D., Patterson, B. K., Ganem, D., DeRisi, J. L. 2006; 43 (8): E71-E76

    Abstract

    A pan-viral DNA microarray, the Virochip (University of California, San Francisco), was used to detect human parainfluenzavirus 4 (HPIV-4) infection in an immunocompetent adult presenting with a life-threatening acute respiratory illness. The virus was identified in an endotracheal aspirate specimen, and the microarray results were confirmed by specific polymerase chain reaction and serological analysis for HPIV-4. Conventional clinical laboratory testing using an extensive panel of microbiological tests failed to yield a diagnosis. This case suggests that the potential severity of disease caused by HPIV-4 in adults may be greater than previously appreciated and illustrates the clinical utility of a microarray for broad-based viral pathogen screening.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000240666200029

    View details for PubMedID 16983602

  • Urban lymphatic filariasis in central Nigeria ANNALS OF TROPICAL MEDICINE AND PARASITOLOGY Terranella, A., Eigiege, A., Gontor, I., Dagwa, P., Damishi, S., Miri, E., Blackburn, B., McFarland, D., Zingeser, J., Jinadu, M. Y., Richards, F. O. 2006; 100 (2): 163-172

    Abstract

    Wuchereria bancrofti and the other mosquito-borne parasites that cause human lymphatic filariasis (LF) infect over 120 million people world-wide. Global efforts are underway to stop transmission of the parasites, using annual, single-dose mass drug administrations (MDA) to all at-risk populations. Although most MDA to date have been in rural settings, they are also recommended in urban areas of transmission. It remains unclear whether there is significant urban transmission in West Africa, however, and the need for urban MDA in this region therefore remains a matter of debate.Clinic-based surveillance, for the clinical manifestations of LF, has now been used to identify areas of urban transmission of W. bancrofti in Jos, the major urban population centre of Plateau state, Nigeria. The eight clinics investigated were all located in slum areas, close to vector breeding sites, and were therefore considered to serve at-risk populations. Over a 1-month period, selected providers in these clinics sought hydrocele, lymphoedema, elephantiasis, or acute adenolymphangitis among the patients seeking treatment. The consenting patients who were suspected clinical cases of LF, and a cohort of patients suspected to be cases of onchocerciasis, were tested for W. bancrofti antigenaemia. All the patients were asked a series of questions in an attempt to determine if those found antigenaemic could only have been infected in an urban area. During the study, 30 suspected clinical cases of LF were detected and 18 of these (including two patients who were found to be antigenaemic) lived in urban areas. Of the 98 patients with exclusively urban exposure who were tested for filarial antigenaemia, six (6.1%) were found antigenaemic. Clinic-based surveillance appears to be a useful tool for determining if there is W. bancrofti transmission in an urban setting.

    View details for DOI 10.1179/136485906X86266

    View details for Web of Science ID 000236031200008

    View details for PubMedID 16492364

  • Schistosomiasis and Strongyloidiasis chapters The Red Book Blackburn B 2006; 27th Ed.: 587-88; 629-631
  • Outbreak of Cryptosporidiosis Associated with Consumption of Ozonated Apple Cider Emerg Infec Dis Blackburn BG, Mazurek J, Hlavsa M, Park J, Tillapaw M, Parrish M, Salehi E, Franks W, Koch E, Smith F, Xiao L, Arrowood M, Hill V, da Silva A, Jones J 2006; 12: 684-686
  • Emergency survey methods in acute cryptosporidiosis outbreak EMERGING INFECTIOUS DISEASES Fox, L. M., Ocfemia, M. C., Hunt, D. C., Blackburn, B. G., Neises, D., Kent, W. K., Beach, M. J., Pezzino, G. 2005; 11 (5): 729-731

    Abstract

    In August 2003, a communitywide outbreak of cryptosporidiosis occurred in Kansas. We conducted a case-control study to assess risk factors associated with Cryptosporidium infection by using the telephone survey infrastructure of the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Using existing state-based infrastructure provides an innovative means for investigating acute outbreaks.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000228683000017

    View details for PubMedID 15890130

  • Schistosomiasis Health Information for International Travel 2005-2006 (The Yellow Book) Blackburn B, Maguire J 2005: 266-270
  • Surveillance for waterborne-disease outbreaks associated with recreational water--United States, 2001-2002. Morbidity and mortality weekly report. Surveillance summaries (Washington, D.C. : 2002) Yoder, J. S., Blackburn, B. G., Craun, G. F., Hill, V., Levy, D. A., Chen, N., Lee, S. H., Calderon, R. L., Beach, M. J. 2004; 53 (8): 1-22

    Abstract

    Since 1971, CDC, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists have maintained a collaborative surveillance system for collecting and periodically reporting data related to occurrences and causes of waterborne-disease outbreaks (WBDOs) related to drinking water; tabulation of recreational water-associated outbreaks was added to the surveillance system in 1978. This surveillance system is the primary source of data concerning the scope and effects of waterborne disease outbreaks on persons in the United States.This summary includes data on WBDOs associated with recreational water that occurred during January 2001-December 2002 and on a previously unreported outbreak that occurred during 1998.Public health departments in the states, territories, localities, and the Freely Associated States are primarily responsible for detecting and investigating WBDOs and voluntarily reporting them to CDC on a standard form. The surveillance system includes data for outbreaks associated with both drinking water and recreational water; only outbreaks associated with recreational water are reported in this summary.During 2001-2002, a total of 65 WBDOs associated with recreational water were reported by 23 states. These 65 outbreaks caused illness among an estimated 2,536 persons; 61 persons were hospitalized, eight of whom died. This is the largest number of recreational water-associated outbreaks to occur since reporting began in 1978; the number of recreational water-associated outbreaks has increased significantly during this period (p<0.01). Of these 65 outbreaks, 30 (46.2%) involved gastroenteritis. The etiologic agent was identified in 23 (76.7%) of these 30 outbreaks; 18 (60.0%) of the 30 were associated with swimming or wading pools. Eight (12.3%) of the 65 recreational water-associated disease outbreaks were attributed to single cases of primary amebic meningoencephalitis caused by Naegleria fowleri; all eight cases were fatal and were associated with swimming in a lake (n = seven; 87.5%) or river (n = one; 12.5%). Of the 65 outbreaks, 21 (32.3%) involved dermatitis; 20 (95.2%) of these 21 outbreaks were associated with spas or pools. In addition, one outbreak of Pontiac fever associated with a spa was reported to CDC. Four (6.1%) of the 65 outbreaks involved acute respiratory illness associated with chemical exposure at pools.The 30 outbreaks involving gastroenteritis comprised the largest proportion of recreational water-associated outbreaks during this reporting period. These outbreaks were associated most frequently with Cryptosporidium (50.0%) in treated water venues and with toxigenic Escherichia coli (25.0%) and norovirus (25.0%) in freshwater venues. The increase in the number of outbreaks since 1993 could reflect improved surveillance and reporting at the local and state level, a true increase in the number of WBDOs, or a combination of these factors.CDC uses surveillance data to identify the etiologic agents, types of aquatics venues, water-treatment systems, and deficiencies associated with outbreaks and to evaluate the adequacy of efforts (e.g., regulations and public awareness activities) for providing safe recreational water. Surveillance data are also used to establish public health prevention priorities, which might lead to improved water-quality regulations at the local, state, and federal levels.

    View details for PubMedID 15499306

Footer Links:

Stanford Medicine Resources: