Bio

Bio


Dr Basina is a clinical endocrinologist and clinical researcher with a focus on diabetes management, thyroid, and adrenal conditions. Her primary interests are in Type 1 Diabetes, Diabetes technology, and Diabetes in pregnancy. Dr Basina is Board certified in Endocrinology and Internal Medicine.
She received numerous teaching awards and Stanford Hospital award for excellence in patient care.
She is an active member of medical advisory boards for several community diabetes organizations. Dr Basina is a medical director of inpatient diabetes program at Stanford and a chair of diabetes task force.

Clinical Focus


  • Endocrinology
  • Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
  • Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
  • Thyroid Diseases
  • Diabetes and Metabolism
  • adrenal disorders
  • Diabetes Mellitus Type 1 and DM technology

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Medical Director of Inpatient Diabetes, Stanford Hospital and Clinics (2012 - Present)

Honors & Awards


  • Stanford University Division of Endocrinology Fellows Teaching Award, Stanford University (2016, 2017)
  • Alwin C. Rambar-James B. D. Mark Award for Excellence in patient care, Stanford University (2014)
  • Stanford University Division of Endocrinology Fellows Teaching Award, Stanford University (2009, 2010, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015)
  • Top Recommended Doctor, Bay Area Consumer Report Magazine (2007)
  • House staff Award for Demonstrating Excellence in Clinical Teaching, Kaiser Permanente Internal Medicine Residency Program (2004)

Boards, Advisory Committees, Professional Organizations


  • Medical Advisory Board Member, BeyondType1 (2016 - Present)
  • Advisory Board Member, Cardiac Therapy Foundation (2012 - Present)
  • Advisory Board Member, CarbDM Seize Diabetes (2012 - Present)
  • Chair Diabetes Task Force, Stanford University (2009 - Present)
  • Member, Endocrine Society (2001 - Present)
  • Member, American Diabetes Association (2001 - Present)

Professional Education


  • Fellowship:Stanford University School of Medicine Registrar (2003) CA
  • Medical Education:Second Moscow Medical University (1987) Russia
  • Board Certification: Internal Medicine, American Board of Internal Medicine (2001)
  • Board Certification, American Board of Internal Medicine, Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism (2013)
  • Board Certification: Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, American Board of Internal Medicine (2003)
  • Residency:UCLA/West Los Angeles VAMC (2001) CA
  • Internship:UCLA/West Los Angeles VAMC (1999) CA
  • Board Certification, Board of Internal Medicine, Internal Medicine (2001)
  • Board Certification, Board of Internal Medicine, Endocrinology and Diabetes (2003)
  • Fellowship, Stanford University, Endocrinology (2003)
  • Residency, UCLA/West LA VA, Internal Medicine (2001)
  • Internship, UCLA/West LA VA, Medicine (1999)
  • MD, Moscow Medical School, Russia, Medicine (1987)

Research & Scholarship

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


Diabetes type I and type II, insulin pump therapy, glucose sensor technology, insulin resistance, PCOS, thyroid disorders

Clinical Trials


  • Rosiglitazone-Induced Weight Gain Not Recruiting

    Given the high prevalence of type 2 diabetes and the 2- to 4-fold increased risk of fatal and non-fatal coronary heart disease events in these patients, long-term glycemic control is of great importance. TZDs improves glycemic control in patients with type 2 DM as well as enhances their insulin-mediated glucose disposal. However, the improvement of glycemic control seen with TZDs may be blunted in the long run by weight gain. Previous data on weight gain during TZD therapy in patients with type 2 DM is very sparse. It is generally assumed that an increase in adipocyte differentiation is the cause of weight gain in association with TZD treatment which may limit their use. Increased body weight assumed to compromise the positive effects of treatment. There is also a theoretical concern that, with the development of new adipocytes, future weight loss may be difficult. However, if weight gain is primarily due to failure to adjust caloric intake in proportion to the decrease in urinary glucose loss, it is totally preventable. It has been previously shown that improvement of glycemia favored weight gain by decreasing the energy loss in the urine as glucose. Severity of weight gain appears to be proportional to the level of glycemic control achieved. The overall goal of the proposed research is to provide the experimental evidence for the later alternative by showing that the modest weight gain that takes place in association with effective rosiglitazone treatment of hyperglycemic patients with type 2 DM is primarily due to its therapeutic efficacy. More specifically, by decreasing the caloric intake in proportion to a decrease in urinary glucose loss associated with improved glycemic control, we will be able to prevent significant weight gain following Rosiglitazone treatment. In order to provide an optimal dietary modification that can be universally applied to TZD-treated patients in clinical practice, we will have a group with a fixed amount of caloric restriction per day. It will be the first randomized controlled trial of a potential strategy for prevention of weight gain associated with thiazolidinediones.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Marina Basina, MD, 510-752-6332.

    View full details

  • Stroke Hyperglycemia Insulin Network Effort (SHINE) Trial Recruiting

    The Stroke Hyperglycemia Insulin Network Effort (SHINE) Trial is a multicenter, randomized, controlled clinical trial of 1400 patients that will include approximately 60 enrolling sites. The study hypotheses are that treatment of hyperglycemic acute ischemic stroke patients with targeted glucose concentration (80mg/dL - 130 mg/dL) will be safe and result in improved 3 month outcome after stroke. Eligible subjects must be within 12 hours of stroke symptom onset and have diabetes and glucose concentrations of over 110 mg/dL on initial evaluation. The enrolling sites will include the Neurological Emergencies Treatment Trials (NETT) sites as well as non NETT sites from all over the United States. The study will evaluate the safety and efficacy of targeted glucose control (treatment group - IV insulin with target 80-130 mg/dl) verses control therapy of sub q insulin plus basal insulin with target glucose less than 180 mg/ dL. The primary outcome will be functional outcome at 3 months as measured by the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) Score. The primary safety outcome will be severe hypoglycemia defined as <40 mg/dL. Enrollment will occur over 3.5 - 4 years.

    View full details

  • A Trial Comparing the Efficacy and Safety of Insulin Degludec and Insulin Glargine 300 Units/mL in Subjects With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Inadequately Treated With Basal Insulin With or Without Oral Antidiabetic Drugs Not Recruiting

    This trial is conducted in Europe and North America. The aim of the trial is to compare the efficacy and safety of insulin degludec and insulin glargine 300 units/mL in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus inadequately treated with basal insulin with or without oral antidiabetic drugs. Due to change in glycaemic data collection process, this trial is amended to allow for a full 36 weeks (maintenance 2 period) of the use of the new process.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial.

    View full details

Teaching

Publications

All Publications


  • Glucose sensor-augmented continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion in patients with diabetic gastroparesis: An open-label pilot prospective study PLOS ONE Calles-Escandon, J., Koch, K. L., Hasler, W. L., Van Natta, M. L., Pasricha, P. J., Tonascia, J., Parkman, H. P., Hamilton, F., Herman, W. H., Basina, M., Buckingham, B., Earle, K., Kirkeby, K., Hairston, K., Bright, T., Rothberg, A. E., Kraftson, A. T., Siraj, E. S., Subauste, A., Lee, L. A., Abell, T. L., McCallum, R. W., Sarosiek, I., Nguyen, L., Fass, R., Snape, W. J., Vaughn, I. A., Miriel, L. A., Farrugia, G., NIDDK Gastroparesis Clinical Re 2018; 13 (4): e0194759

    Abstract

    Erratic blood glucose levels can be a cause and consequence of delayed gastric emptying in patients with diabetes. It is unknown if better glycemic control increases risks of hypoglycemia or improves hemoglobin A1c levels and gastrointestinal symptoms in diabetic gastroparesis. This study investigated the safety and potential efficacy of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) and continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) in poorly controlled diabetes with gastroparesis. Forty-five type 1 or 2 patients with diabetes and gastroparesis and hemoglobin A1c >8% from the NIDDK Gastroparesis Consortium enrolled in a 24 week open-label pilot prospective study of CSII plus CGM. The primary safety outcome was combined numbers of mild, moderate, and severe hypoglycemic events at screening and 24 weeks treatment. Secondary outcomes included glycemic excursions on CGM, hemoglobin A1c, gastroparesis symptoms, quality-of-life, and liquid meal tolerance. Combined mild, moderate, and severe hypoglycemic events occurred similarly during the screening/run-in (1.9/week) versus treatment (2.2/week) phases with a relative risk of 1.18 (95% CI 0.85-1.64, P = 0.33). CGM time in hypoglycemia (<70 mg/dL) decreased from 3.9% to 1.8% (P<0.0001), time in euglycemia (70-180 mg/dL) increased from 44.0% to 52.0% (P = 0.02), time in severe hyperglycemia (>300 mg/dL) decreased from 14.2% to 7.0% (P = 0.005), and hemoglobin A1c decreased from 9.4±1.4% to 8.3±1.3% (P = 0.001) on CSII plus CGM. Symptom scores decreased from 29.3±7.1 to 21.9±10.2 with lower nausea/vomiting, fullness/early satiety, and bloating/distention scores (P≤0.001). Quality-of-life scores improved from 2.4±1.1 to 3.1±1.1 (P<0.0001) and volumes of liquid nutrient meals tolerated increased from 420±258 to 487±312 mL (P = 0.05) at 24 weeks. In conclusion, CSII plus CGM appeared to be safe with minimal risks of hypoglycemic events and associated improvements in glycemic control, gastroparesis symptoms, quality-of-life, and meal tolerance in patients with poorly controlled diabetes and gastroparesis. This study supports the safety, feasibility, and potential benefits of improving glycemic control in diabetic gastroparesis.

    View details for DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0194759

    View details for Web of Science ID 000430026900009

    View details for PubMedID 29652893

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC5898706

  • Use of a Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion Patch Pump in a Blind Patient with Type 1 Diabetes and Major Complications: Case Report Simos, A., Basina, M. AMER DIABETES ASSOC. 2016: A20
  • Successful long-term treatment of Cushing disease with mifepristone (RU486). Endocrine practice Basina, M., Liu, H., Hoffman, A. R., Feldman, D. 2012; 18 (5): e114-20

    Abstract

    We describe a girl with Cushing disease for whom surgery and radiation treatments failed and the subsequent clinical course with mifepristone therapy.We present the patient's clinical, biochemical, and imaging findings.A 16-year-old girl presented with classic Cushing disease. After transsphenoidal surgery, Cyberknife radiosurgery, ketoconazole, and metyrapone did not control her disease, and she was prescribed mifepristone, which was titrated to a maximal dosage of 1200 mg daily with subsequent symptom improvement. Mifepristone (RU486) is a high-affinity, nonselective antagonist of the glucocorticoid receptor. There is limited literature on its use as an off-label medication to treat refractory Cushing disease. Over her 8-year treatment with mifepristone, her therapy was complicated by hypertension and hypokalemia requiring spironolactone and potassium chloride. She received a 2-month drug holiday every 4 to 6 months to allow for withdrawal menstrual bleeding with medroxyprogesterone acetate. Urinary cortisol, serum cortisol, and corticotropin levels remained elevated during mifepristone drug holidays. While on mifepristone, her signs and symptoms of Cushing disease resolved. Repeated magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated stable appearance of the residual pituitary mass. Bilateral adrenalectomy was performed, and mifepristone was discontinued after 95 months of medical therapy.We describe the longest duration of mifepristone therapy thus reported for the treatment of refractory Cushing disease. Mifepristone effectively controlled all signs and symptoms of hypercortisolism. Menstruating women who take the drug on a long-term basis should receive periodic drug holidays to allow for menses. The lack of reliable serum biomarkers to monitor the success of mifepristone therapy requires careful clinical judgment and may make its use difficult in Cushing disease.

    View details for DOI 10.4158/EP11391.CR

    View details for PubMedID 22441000

  • Clinical efficacy of two hypocaloric diets that vary in overweight patients with type 2 diabetes - Comparison of moderate fat versus carbohydrate reductions DIABETES CARE McLaughlin, T., Carter, S., Lamendola, C., Abbasi, F., Schaaf, P., Basina, M., Reaven, G. 2007; 30 (7): 1877-1879

    View details for DOI 10.2337/dc07-0301

    View details for Web of Science ID 000247768400036

    View details for PubMedID 17475941

  • Effects of moderate variations in macronutrient composition on weight loss and reduction in cardiovascular disease risk in obese, insulin-resistant adults AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NUTRITION McLaughlin, T., Carter, S., Lamendola, C., Abbasi, F., Yee, G., Schaaf, P., Basina, M., Reaven, G. 2006; 84 (4): 813-821

    Abstract

    Obese, insulin-resistant persons are at risk of cardiovascular disease. How best to achieve both weight loss and clinical benefit in these persons is controversial, and recent reports questioned the superiority of low-fat diets.We aimed to ascertain the effects of moderate variations in the carbohydrate and fat content of calorie-restricted diets on weight loss and cardiovascular disease risk in obese, insulin-resistant persons.Fifty-seven randomly assigned, insulin-resistant, obese persons completed a 16-wk calorie-restricted diet with 15% of energy as protein and either 60% and 25% or 40% and 45% of energy as carbohydrate and fat, respectively. Baseline and postweight-loss insulin resistance; daylong glucose, insulin, and triacylglycerol concentrations; fasting lipid and lipoprotein concentrations; and markers of endothelial function were quantified.Weight loss with 60% or 40% of energy as carbohydrate (5.7 +/- 0.7 or 6.9 +/- 0.7 kg, respectively) did not differ significantly, and improvement in insulin sensitivity correlated with the amount of weight lost (r = 0.50, P < 0.001). Subjects following the diet with 40% of energy as carbohydrate had greater reductions in daylong insulin and triacylglycerol (P < 0.05) and fasting triacylglycerol (0.53 mmol/L; P = 0.04) concentrations, greater increases in HDL-cholesterol concentrations (0.12 mmol/L; P < 0.01) and LDL particle size (1.82 s; P < 0.05), and a greater decrease in plasma E-selectin (5.6 ng/L; P = 0.02) than did subjects following the diet with 60% of energy as carbohydrate.In obese, insulin-resistant persons, a calorie-restricted diet, moderately lower in carbohydrate and higher in unsaturated fat, is as efficacious as the traditional low-fat diet in producing weight loss and may be more beneficial in reducing markers for cardiovascular disease risk.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000241140700019

    View details for PubMedID 17023708

  • Metabolic and ovarian effects of rosiglitazone treatment for 12 weeks in insulin-resistant women with polycystic ovary syndrome HUMAN REPRODUCTION Cataldo, N. A., Abbasi, F., McLaughlin, T. L., Basina, M., Fechner, P. Y., Giudice, L. C., Reaven, G. M. 2006; 21 (1): 109-120

    Abstract

    Insulin sensitizers have favourable metabolic and ovarian effects in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). This study examined rosiglitazone, a thiazolidinedione, in PCOS.In a prospective, open-label study, the effects of rosiglitazone on metabolism and ovarian function were examined in 42 non-diabetic women with PCOS classified according to the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development criteria and insulin resistance (IR) by steady-state plasma glucose (SSPG) > or =10 mmol/l on octreotide-modified insulin suppression testing. Participants were randomized to rosiglitazone 2, 4 or 8 mg daily for 12 weeks. Endpoints included ovulation and menstrual pattern; serum testosterone, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), and LH; and changes in IR and glucose-insulin responses on 8 h mixed-meal profile.After rosiglitazone 8 mg daily for 12 weeks, SSPG declined and insulinaemia fell by 46%; lower doses gave lesser effects. Serum LH, total and free testosterone were unchanged; SHBG increased. With rosiglitazone, ovulation occurred in 23/42 women (55%), without significant dose dependence. Both before and during treatment, ovulators on rosiglitazone had lower circulating insulin and free testosterone and higher SHBG than non-ovulators. Testosterone declined only in a subgroup of ovulators with early vaginal bleeding after starting rosiglitazone.Rosiglitazone in insulin-resistant PCOS promoted ovulation and dose-dependently decreased IR and insulinaemia; ovulators had lower circulating insulin and testosterone.

    View details for DOI 10.1093/humrep/dei289

    View details for Web of Science ID 000233846700014

    View details for PubMedID 16155076

  • Effectiveness of Diabetes Management: is Improvement Feasible? American Journal of Medicine Marina Basina, Frederick B Kraemer 2002; 112 (8)
  • Utilization of Thyrogen. Thyroid Weisler, S., Basina, M, Hershman JM 2001; 11 (11)