Bio

Bio


Maria Yefimova PhD RN is a nurse researcher working to address disability, social and palliative needs of older patients and support their caregivers in the home and community-based settings. Her research focuses on emergent technological solutions, such as remote health monitoring and predictive analytics.
She is a health services researcher with the HSR&D Center for Innovation to Implementation (Ci2i) at VA Palo Alto Healthcare System. She also has a position with the Office of Research, Patient Care Services at Stanford Healthcare. Dr. Yefimova earned her Bachelor’s, Master’s and PhD degrees in Nursing from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). She completed her post-doctoral fellowship in the National Clinician Scholars Program at UCLA, among the first nurses to receive health services research training alongside physicians in the legacy of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Clinical Scholars Program.

Academic Appointments


Publications

All Publications


  • Daily Context for Abusive and Neglectful Behavior in Family Caregiving for Dementia. The Gerontologist Pickering, C. E., Yefimova, M., Maxwell, C., Puga, F., Sullivan, T. 2019

    Abstract

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to identify risk and protective factors for abusive and neglectful behavior in the context of daily caregiving.RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Family caregivers who co-reside with a care recipient with Alzheimer's disease and related dementia, recruited from social media, completed 21-days of diaries. Multilevel modeling with days (n = 831) nested within caregivers (N = 50) was used to evaluate relationships between hypothesized risk and protective factors and the odds of an abusive or neglectful behavior on a given day.RESULTS: Disruptions in the daily routine and stress of the caregiver related to behavioral symptoms of the care recipient are significant risk factors for abusive and neglectful behavior. Participating in a meaningful activity with the care recipient when it occurs twice in a day is a significant protective factor against use of a neglect behavior (OR = 0.19; CI 0.06-0.64; p = .01), but not for abusive behavior. Hypotheses that spending the full day together would increase risk, and that receipt of instrumental support and caregiver participation in self-care would decrease risk, were not supported.DISCUSSION AND IMPLICATIONS: Findings demonstrate that risk of an abusive or neglectful behavior varies from day-to-day in the presence and absence of contextual factors, and that the majority of the variance in the odds an abusive or neglectful behavior occurring is related to day-level factors. Findings demonstrate that diary surveys are critical to identifying ecologically valid modifiable risk and protective factors for abusive and neglectful behaviors that can be targeted in future interventions.

    View details for DOI 10.1093/geront/gnz110

    View details for PubMedID 31425586