Bio

Clinical Focus


  • Pediatric cardiac anesthesia
  • Anesthesia
  • Pediatric Anesthesia

Academic Appointments


Professional Education


  • Residency:Trafford General Hospital (Aug 1999) UK
  • Residency:St John's Hospital at Howden (Aug 1998) UK
  • Residency:South Manchester NHS Trust (Feb 1999) UK
  • Internship:South Manchester NHS Trust (Feb 1997) UK
  • Medical Education:Edinburgh University (1997) UK
  • Residency:South East Scotland School of Anaesthesia (May 2007) Scotland
  • Residency:South East Scotland School of Anaesthesia (Nov 2001) Scotland
  • Fellowship:Westmead Children's Hospital (Jan 2006) Australia

Publications

Journal Articles


  • Pediatric pacemakers and ICDs: how to optimize perioperative care PEDIATRIC ANESTHESIA Navaratnam, M., Dubin, A. 2011; 21 (5): 512-521

    Abstract

    An increasing number of pediatric patients with permanent pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) require cardiac and noncardiac surgery. It is critical that the anesthesiologist caring for these patients understands the management of the device and the underlying heart disease. Children with these devices are more vulnerable to lead failure and inappropriate shocks compared with the adult population. Preoperative assessment and appropriate reprogramming of the device, in addition to minimizing sources of electromagnetic interference, are keystones in the perioperative care of these patients. Prior consultation with qualified programmers is recommended to enable timely optimization of the device. Magnets may be used in emergency situations but it is important to appreciate the limitations of magnet use on different models of pacemakers and ICDs. Safe and successful perioperative care is dependent upon a well-organized and coordinated multidisciplinary team approach.

    View details for DOI 10.1111/j.1460-9592.2011.03562.x

    View details for Web of Science ID 000289469500006

    View details for PubMedID 21481077

Conference Proceedings


  • Surgical Reconstruction of Tracheal Stenosis in Conjunction With Congenital Heart Defects Mainwaring, R. D., Shillingford, M., Davies, R., Koltai, P., Navaratnam, M., Reddy, V. M., Hanley, F. L. ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC. 2012: 1266-1273

    Abstract

    Surgical reconstruction is the primary method of treating airway obstruction in children. Tracheal stenosis is frequently associated with congenital heart defects, which may further complicate the overall management strategy. The purpose of this study was to review our experience with surgical reconstruction of airway obstruction in conjunction with congenital heart defects.This was a retrospective review of our surgical experience with tracheal stenosis from February 2003 to August 2011. Twenty-seven patients were identified in our database. Six patients had isolated, congenital tracheal stenosis, and 21 had tracheal stenosis in association with congenital heart defects. There were two identifiable subgroups. Thirteen patients had airway stenoses identified concurrently with congenital heart defects and underwent combined repair. The second group comprised 8 patients who had previous correction of their congenital heart defects and experienced delayed presentation of tracheal (n = 6) or bronchial (n = 2) obstruction.The median age at surgery was 9 months. There were 2 postoperative deaths, both in children with single ventricle. The median duration of follow-up for the entire cohort of 25 surviving patients was 4 years. None of the patients have required reoperations on the trachea; 5 have had minor reinterventions.The data demonstrate that tracheal obstruction is frequently found in conjunction with congenital heart defects. Nearly one third of our patients had delayed presentation of airway obstruction that was identified subsequent to previous congenital heart defect repair. Tracheal reconstructive techniques were effective regardless of the cause of the airway obstruction.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.athoracsur.2011.12.063

    View details for Web of Science ID 000302120200049

    View details for PubMedID 22381444

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