Current Role at Stanford

Biostatistician, QSU, BMIR

Education & Certifications

  • MS, University of Minnesota, Biostatistics (2012)
  • BME, University of Minnesota, Mechanical Engineering (2009)
  • AS, Minneapolis Community and Technical College, Mathematics (2006)


  • Benjamin Arcand, Bryan N. Rolfes, Nikhil M. Murdeshwar, Joseph E. Hale, Steven M. Johnson, Luke A. Mitlyng, Joseph Mullenbach, Kristopher I. Kapphahn. "United States Patent US 8402619 B2 System and method for reducing environmental crematorial release of mercury from mercury-containing dental amalgam", Minnesota Funeral Directors Association, Mar 26, 2013


All Publications

  • Leading Causes of Death among Asian American Subgroups (2003-2011) PLOS ONE Hastings, K. G., Jose, P. O., Kapphahn, K. I., Frank, A. T., Goldstein, B. A., Thompson, C. A., Eggleston, K., Cullen, M. R., Palaniappan, L. P. 2015; 10 (4)
  • Cardiovascular Disease Mortality in Asian Americans JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN COLLEGE OF CARDIOLOGY Jose, P. O., Frank, A. T., Kapphahn, K. I., Goldstein, B. A., Eggleston, K., Hastings, K. G., Cullen, M. R., Palaniappan, L. P. 2014; 64 (23): 2486-2494


    Asian Americans are a rapidly growing racial/ethnic group in the United States. Our current understanding of Asian-American cardiovascular disease mortality patterns is distorted by the aggregation of distinct subgroups.The purpose of the study was to examine heart disease and stroke mortality rates in Asian-American subgroups to determine racial/ethnic differences in cardiovascular disease mortality within the United States.We examined heart disease and stroke mortality rates for the 6 largest Asian-American subgroups (Asian Indian, Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, Korean, and Vietnamese) from 2003 to 2010. U.S. death records were used to identify race/ethnicity and cause of death by International Classification of Diseases-10th revision coding. Using both U.S. Census data and death record data, standardized mortality ratios (SMRs), relative SMRs (rSMRs), and proportional mortality ratios were calculated for each sex and ethnic group relative to non-Hispanic whites (NHWs).In this study, 10,442,034 death records were examined. Whereas NHW men and women had the highest overall mortality rates, Asian Indian men and women and Filipino men had greater proportionate mortality burden from ischemic heart disease. The proportionate mortality burden of hypertensive heart disease and cerebrovascular disease, especially hemorrhagic stroke, was higher in every Asian-American subgroup compared with NHWs.The heterogeneity in cardiovascular disease mortality patterns among diverse Asian-American subgroups calls attention to the need for more research to help direct more specific treatment and prevention efforts, in particular with hypertension and stroke, to reduce health disparities for this growing population.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jacc.2014.08.048

    View details for Web of Science ID 000345962400007

    View details for PubMedID 25500233

  • Impact of San Francisco's Toy Ordinance on Restaurants and Children's Food Purchases, 2011-2012 PREVENTING CHRONIC DISEASE Otten, J. J., Saelens, B. E., Kapphahn, K. I., Hekler, E. B., Buman, M. P., Goldstein, B. A., Krukowski, R. A., O'Donohue, L. S., Gardner, C. D., King, A. C. 2014; 11


    In 2011, San Francisco passed the first citywide ordinance to improve the nutritional standards of children's meals sold at restaurants by preventing the giving away of free toys or other incentives with meals unless nutritional criteria were met. This study examined the impact of the Healthy Food Incentives Ordinance at ordinance-affected restaurants on restaurant response (eg, toy-distribution practices, change in children's menus), and the energy and nutrient content of all orders and children's-meal-only orders purchased for children aged 0 through 12 years.Restaurant responses were examined from January 2010 through March 2012. Parent-caregiver/child dyads (n = 762) who were restaurant customers were surveyed at 2 points before and 1 seasonally matched point after ordinance enactment at Chain A and B restaurants (n = 30) in 2011 and 2012.Both restaurant chains responded to the ordinance by selling toys separately from children's meals, but neither changed their menus to meet ordinance-specified nutrition criteria. Among children for whom children's meals were purchased, significant decreases in kilocalories, sodium, and fat per order were likely due to changes in children's side dishes and beverages at Chain A.Although the changes at Chain A did not appear to be directly in response to the ordinance, the transition to a more healthful beverage and default side dish was consistent with the intent of the ordinance. Study results underscore the importance of policy wording, support the concept that more healthful defaults may be a powerful approach for improving dietary intake, and suggest that public policies may contribute to positive restaurant changes.

    View details for DOI 10.5888/pcd11.140026

    View details for Web of Science ID 000343522200006

    View details for PubMedID 25032837

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