Bio

Clinical Focus


  • Pediatric cardiac anesthesia
  • Pediatric anesthesia
  • Anesthesia

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Clinical Associate Professor, Anesthesia (2011 - Present)
  • Clinical Assistant Professor, Anesthesia (2004 - 2011)
  • Clinical Instructor, Anesthesia (2003 - 2004)
  • Staff Physician, Anesthesia (2002 - 2003)

Professional Education


  • Board Certification: Pediatric Anesthesia, American Board of Anesthesiology (2013)
  • Residency:University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics (2001) WI
  • Medical Education:RNT Medical College (1993) India
  • Internship:Louisiana State University Hospital (1998) LA
  • Residency:Louisiana State University Hospital (1998) LA
  • Fellowship:Stanford University School of Medicine (2002) CA
  • Board Certification: Anesthesia, American Board of Anesthesiology (2003)
  • Diplomate in Perioperative TEE, NBE, Perioperative TEE (2007)
  • MBBS, RNT Medical College-INDIA, Medicine (1995)

Community and International Work


  • Mission, Madras, India

    Topic

    Congenital Heart Disease

    Partnering Organization(s)

    University of Wisconsin

    Populations Served

    Underserved

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    No

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

Research & Scholarship

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


Pediatric Cardiac Anesthesia
Transesophageal Echocardiography
Adult Congenital Heart Disease

Teaching

2013-14 Courses


Graduate and Fellowship Programs


Publications

Journal Articles


  • Role of transesophageal echocardiography in the management of pediatric patients with congenital heart disease PEDIATRIC ANESTHESIA Kamra, K., Russell, I., Miller-Hance, W. C. 2011; 21 (5): 479-493

    Abstract

    Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) has become a critical diagnostic and perioperative management tool for patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) undergoing cardiac and noncardiac surgical procedures. This review highlights the role of TEE in routine management of pediatric cardiac patient population with focus on indications, views, applications and technological advances.

    View details for DOI 10.1111/j.1460-9592.2011.03570.x

    View details for Web of Science ID 000289469500003

    View details for PubMedID 21481076

  • Perioperative complications in children with pulmonary hypertension undergoing general anesthesia with ketamine PEDIATRIC ANESTHESIA Williams, G. D., Maan, H., Ramamoorthy, C., Kamra, K., Bratton, S. L., Bair, E., Kuan, C. C., Hammer, G. B., Feinstein, J. A. 2010; 20 (1): 28-37

    Abstract

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is associated with significant perioperative risk for major complications in children, including pulmonary hypertensive crisis and cardiac arrest. Uncertainty remains about the safety of ketamine anesthesia in this patient population.Retrospectively review the medical records of children with PAH to ascertain the nature and frequency of peri-procedural complications and to determine whether ketamine administration was associated with peri-procedural complications.Children with PAH (mean pulmonary artery pressure > or =25 mmHg and pulmonary vascular resistance index > or =3 Wood units) who underwent general anesthesia for procedures during a 6-year period (2002-2008) were enrolled. Details about the patient, PAH, procedure, anesthetic and postprocedural course were noted, including adverse events during or within 48 h of the procedure. Complication rates were reported per procedure. Association between ketamine and peri-procedural complications was tested.Sixty-eight children (median age 7.3 year, median weight 22 kg) underwent 192 procedures. Severity of PAH was mild (23%), moderate (37%), and severe (40%). Procedures undertaken were major surgery (n = 20), minor surgery (n = 27), cardiac catheterization (n = 128) and nonsurgical procedures (n = 17). Ketamine was administered during 149 procedures. Twenty minor and nine major complications were noted. Incidence of cardiac arrest was 0.78% for cardiac catheterization procedures, 10% for major surgical procedures and 1.6% for all procedures. There was no procedure-related mortality. Ketamine administration was not associated with increased complications.Ketamine appears to be a safe anesthetic option for children with PAH. We report rates for cardiopulmonary resuscitation and mortality that are more favorable than those previously reported.

    View details for DOI 10.1111/j.1460-9592.2009.03166.x

    View details for Web of Science ID 000273525800004

    View details for PubMedID 20078799

  • A randomized, controlled trial of aprotinin in neonates undergoing open-heart surgery PEDIATRIC ANESTHESIA Williams, G. D., Ramamoorthy, C., Pentcheva, K., Boltz, M. G., Kamra, K., Reddy, V. M. 2008; 18 (9): 812-819

    Abstract

    Neonates undergoing open-heart surgery are especially at risk for massive bleeding and pronounced inflammation. The efficacy of aprotinin, a serine protease inhibitor, at ameliorating these adverse effects of cardiopulmonary bypass has not been clearly demonstrated in neonates.Term neonates were enrolled and randomly assigned in a blinded fashion to receive saline (group P, placebo) or high-dose aprotinin (group A). Intraoperative management was standardized: surgeon, anesthesia, cardiopulmonary bypass and hemostasis therapy. Patients were admitted postoperatively to a pediatric cardiac intensive care unit. Primary outcome measure of efficacy was duration of the postoperative mechanical ventilation. Secondary outcome measures were total volume and units of blood products transfused intraoperatively and for 24 h after surgery, duration of chest tube in situ, and intensive care and hospital stays after surgery.Twenty-six neonates were enrolled; 13 received aprotinin and 13 received placebo. The study was halted prematurely because of US Food and Drug Administration's concerns about aprotinin's safety. Baseline patient, surgery and cardiopulmonary bypass characteristics were similar between groups. No outcome variables differed between groups (P > 0.05). Duration of postoperative ventilation was 115 +/- 139 h (group A); 126 +/- 82 h (group P); P = 0.29, and total blood product exposure was 8.2 +/- 2.6 U (group A); 8.8 +/- 1.4 U (group P); P = 0.1. Postoperative blood creatinine values did not differ between groups. In-hospital mortality rate was 4%.Aprotinin was not shown to be efficacious in neonates undergoing open-heart surgery. It is unclear whether adult aprotinin safety data are relevant to neonates undergoing open-heart surgery.

    View details for DOI 10.1111/j.1460-9592.2008.02678.x

    View details for Web of Science ID 000257990900002

    View details for PubMedID 18768040

  • Ketamine does not increase pulmonary vascular resistance in children with pulmonary hypertension undergoing sevoflurane anesthesia and spontaneous ventilation ANESTHESIA AND ANALGESIA Williams, G. D., Philip, B. M., Chu, L. F., Boltz, M. G., Kamra, K., Terwey, H., Hammer, G. B., Perry, S. B., Feinstein, J. A., Ramamoorthy, C. 2007; 105 (6): 1578-1584

    Abstract

    The use of ketamine in children with increased pulmonary vascular resistance is controversial. In this prospective, open label study, we evaluated the hemodynamic responses to ketamine in children with pulmonary hypertension (mean pulmonary artery pressure >25 mm Hg).Children aged 3 mo to 18 yr with pulmonary hypertension, who were scheduled for cardiac catheterization with general anesthesia, were studied. Patients were anesthetized with sevoflurane (1 minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration [MAC]) in air while breathing spontaneously via a facemask. After baseline catheterization measurements, sevoflurane was reduced (0.5 MAC) and ketamine (2 mg/kg IV over 5 min) was administered, followed by a ketamine infusion (10 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1)). Catheterization measurements were repeated at 5, 10, and 15 min after completion of ketamine load. Data at various time points were compared (ANOVA, P < 0.05).Fifteen patients (age 147, 108 mo; median, interquartile range) were studied. Diagnoses included idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (5), congenital heart disease (9), and diaphragmatic hernia (1). At baseline, median (interquartile range) baseline pulmonary vascular resistance index was 11.3 (8.2) Wood units; 33% of patients had suprasystemic mean pulmonary artery pressures. Heart rate (99, 94 bpm; P = 0.016) and Pao2 (95, 104 mm Hg; P = 007) changed after ketamine administration (baseline, 15 min after ketamine; P value). There were no significant differences in mean systemic arterial blood pressure, mean pulmonary artery pressure, systemic or pulmonary vascular resistance index, cardiac index, arterial pH, or Paco2.In the presence of sevoflurane, ketamine did not increase pulmonary vascular resistance in spontaneously breathing children with severe pulmonary hypertension.

    View details for DOI 10.1213/01.ane.0000287656.29064.89

    View details for Web of Science ID 000251274400014

    View details for PubMedID 18042853

  • Modified and conventional ultrafiltration during pediatric cardiac surgery: Clinical outcomes compared JOURNAL OF THORACIC AND CARDIOVASCULAR SURGERY Williams, G. D., Ramamoorthy, C., Chu, L., Hammer, G. B., Kamra, K., Boltz, M. G., Pentcheva, K., McCarthy, J. P., Reddy, V. M. 2006; 132 (6): 1291-1298

    Abstract

    This prospective study compared clinical outcomes after heart surgery between three groups of infants with congenital heart disease. One group received dilutional conventional ultrafiltration (group D), another received modified ultrafiltration (group M), and a third group received both dilutional conventional and modified ultrafiltration (group B). We hypothesized that group B patients would have the best clinical outcome.Children younger than 1 year undergoing heart surgery for biventricular repair by the same surgeon were randomly allocated to one of the three study groups. Patient management was standardized, and intensive care staff were blinded to group allocation. Primary outcome measure was duration of postoperative mechanical ventilation. Other outcome measures recorded included total blood products transfused, duration of chest tube in situ, chest tube output, and stays in intensive care and in the hospital.Sixty infants completed study protocol. Mean age and weight were as follows: group D (n = 19), 61 days, 4.3 kg; group M (n = 20), 64 days, 4.5 kg; and group B (n = 21), 86 days, 4.4 kg. Preoperative and intraoperative characteristics were similar between groups. Ultrafiltrate volumes obtained were 196 +/- 93 mL/kg in group D, 105 +/- 33 mL/kg in group M, and 261 +/- 113 mL/kg in group B. There were no significant differences between groups for any outcome variable. Technical difficulties prevented completion of modified ultrafiltration in 2 of 41 infants.There was no clinical advantage in combining conventional and modified ultrafiltration. Because clinical outcomes were similar across groups, relative risks of the ultrafiltration strategies may influence choice.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jtcvs.2006.05.059

    View details for Web of Science ID 000242626200010

    View details for PubMedID 17140945

  • Esophageal saturation during antegrade cerebral perfusion: a preliminary report using visible light spectroscopy PEDIATRIC ANESTHESIA Heninger, C., Ramamoorthy, C., Amir, G., Kamra, K., Reddy, V. M., Hanley, F. L., Brock-Utne, J. G. 2006; 16 (11): 1133-1137

    Abstract

    Visible light spectroscopy (VLS) is newer technology that measures real-time tissue oxygenation. It has been validated in detecting mucosal ischemia in adults. During complex neonatal heart surgery, antegrade cerebral perfusion (ACP) maintains cerebral saturation. Whether ACP maintains peripheral tissue perfusion in humans is not known.Five patients undergoing neonatal open heart surgery with hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) were studied using a VLS esophageal probe in addition to bilateral near infrared cerebral oximetry. Three of five patients required ACP for arch repair, while two patients did not. VLS and cerebral saturation data were collected and analyzed in 5 min intervals prior to CPB, during CPB, and during ACP.In the two patients undergoing heart surgery with routine hypothermic CPB, both cerebral and esophageal saturations were maintained. However in all three neonates requiring ACP, although cerebral saturations did not decrease, esophageal saturation fell below the ischemic threshold (35%). Following establishment of normal CPB, esophageal saturation returned to baseline.Antegrade cerebral perfusion maintains cerebral oxygen delivery, however, it does not adequately perfuse the esophagus in neonates. This could have clinical implications.

    View details for DOI 10.1111/j.1460-9592.2006.01965.x

    View details for Web of Science ID 000241245400004

    View details for PubMedID 17040301

  • Postoperative analgesia after spinal blockade in infants and children undergoing cardiac surgery ANESTHESIA AND ANALGESIA Hammer, G. B., Ramamoorthy, C., Cao, H., Williams, G. D., Boltz, M. G., Kamra, K., Drover, D. R. 2005; 100 (5): 1283-1288

    Abstract

    The aim of this prospective, randomized, controlled clinical trial was to define the opioid analgesic requirement after a remifentanil (REMI)-based anesthetic with spinal anesthetic blockade (SAB+REMI) or without (REMI) spinal blockade for open-heart surgery in children. We enrolled 45 patients who were candidates for tracheal extubation in the operating room after cardiac surgery. Exclusion criteria included age <3 mo and >6 yr, pulmonary hypertension, congestive heart failure, contraindication to SAB, and failure to obtain informed consent. All patients had an inhaled induction with sevoflurane and maintenance of anesthesia with REMI and isoflurane (0.3% end-tidal). In addition, patients assigned to the SAB+REMI group received SAB with tetracaine (0.5-2.0 mg/kg) and morphine (7 mug/kg). After tracheal extubation in the operating room, patients received fentanyl 0.3 mug/kg IV every 10 min by patient-controlled analgesia for pain score = 4. Pain scores and fentanyl doses were recorded every hour for 24 h or until the patient was ready for discharge from the intensive care unit. Patients in the SAB+REMI group had significantly lower pain scores (P = 0.046 for the first 8 h; P =0.05 for 24 h) and received less IV fentanyl (P = 0.003 for the first 8 h; P = 0.004 for 24 h) than those in the REMI group. There were no intergroup differences in adverse effects, including hypotension, bradycardia, highest PaCO(2), lowest pH, episodes of oxygen desaturation, pruritus, and vomiting.

    View details for DOI 10.1213/01.ANE.0000148698.84881.10

    View details for Web of Science ID 000228755400013

    View details for PubMedID 15845670

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