Bio

Professional Education


  • Bachelor of Science, University of Vermont (2005)
  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Arkansas Fayetteville (2011)

Stanford Advisors


Teaching

Publications

Journal Articles


  • The impact of perceived sleep quality and sleep efficiency/duration on cannabis use during a self-guided quit attempt. Addictive behaviors Babson, K. A., Boden, M. T., Bonn-Miller, M. O. 2013; 38 (11): 2707-2713

    Abstract

    Poor sleep quality may play a significant role in observed high rates of sustained cannabis use among veterans attempting to quit. We investigated whether individuals with poorer perceived sleep quality (rather than sleep efficiency/duration), as measured via the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (Buysse, Reynolds, Monk, & Berman, 1989), would have less of a reduction in cannabis use (measured via Timeline FollowBack; Sobell and Sobell, 1992) during the first 6months following a self-guided quit attempt. We expected these effects to remain significant after adjusting for baseline age, posttraumatic stress symptoms, as well as alcohol, tobacco, and opioid use, and cannabis withdrawal severity over the course of 6months following the cannabis cessation attempt. Generalized linear mixed modeling using a Poisson distribution was employed to test the hypotheses among 102 cannabis dependent, primarily male, military veterans. Results indicated that veterans with poor perceived sleep quality had less of a reduction in mean cannabis use following a self-guided cannabis cessation attempt compared to those with good perceived sleep quality, while efficiency/duration was unrelated to cannabis use outcomes. Conclusions from this study should be considered in light of limitations including the use of self-report measures and generalizability to non-veterans and women.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.addbeh.2013.06.012

    View details for PubMedID 23906725

  • HIV Medication Adherence and HIV Symptom Severity: The Roles of Sleep Quality and Memory AIDS PATIENT CARE AND STDS Babson, K. A., Heinz, A. J., Bonn-Miller, M. O. 2013; 27 (10): 544-552

    Abstract

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the extent to which self-reported sleep quality, a clinically malleable factor, is associated with both HIV medication adherence and self-reported HIV symptom severity. In addition, we sought to examine whether sleep quality may explain the association between HIV medication adherence and symptom severity, as well as the role of self-reported memory functioning in terms of the above relations. This study took place from April 2010 to March 2012. Participants were 129 HIV-positive individuals who completed an ART pill count and series of structured clinical interviews and self-report questionnaires on sleep, memory, and HIV symptom severity. A series of regressions were conducted to test study hypotheses. After accounting for covariates (i.e., problematic alcohol, nicotine, and cannabis use, and mood disorder diagnosis), results indicated that self-reported sleep quality was associated with HIV medication adherence and self-reported HIV symptom severity, and that sleep quality partially mediated the relation between medication adherence and self-reported HIV symptom severity. In addition, memory functioning moderated the relation between self-reported sleep quality and HIV symptom severity, such that the interaction of poor sleep quality and relatively good memory functioning was associated with heightened self-reported HIV symptom severity. This study highlights the importance of assessing sleep and memory among HIV-infected individuals as they may represent treatment targets for those experiencing poor medication adherence or particularly severe HIV symptoms. Such information could lead to the inclusion of adjunct brief interventions to target sleep and memory functioning in order to reduce symptom severity among HIV-positive individuals with poor medication adherence.

    View details for DOI 10.1089/apc.2013.0221

    View details for Web of Science ID 000325268600003

    View details for PubMedID 24032625

  • The Impact of Exercise on Suicide Risk: Examining Pathways through Depression, PTSD, and Sleep in an Inpatient Sample of Veterans SUICIDE AND LIFE-THREATENING BEHAVIOR Davidson, C. L., Babson, K. A., Bonn-Miller, M. O., Souter, T., Vannoy, S. 2013; 43 (3): 279-289

    Abstract

    Suicide has a large public health impact. Although effective interventions exist, the many people at risk for suicide cannot access these interventions. Exercise interventions hold promise in terms of reducing suicide because of their ease of implementation. While exercise reduces depression, and reductions in depressive symptoms are linked to reduced suicidal ideation, no studies have directly linked exercise and suicide risk. The current study examined this association, including potential mediators (i.e., sleep disturbance, posttraumatic stress symptoms, and depression), in a sample of Veterans. SEM analyses revealed that exercise was directly and indirectly associated with suicide risk. Additionally, exercise was associated with fewer depressive symptoms and better sleep patterns, each of which was, in turn, related to lower suicide risk.

    View details for DOI 10.1111/sltb.12014

    View details for Web of Science ID 000320180700005

    View details for PubMedID 23901428

  • Sleep Quality Moderates the Relation between Depression Symptoms and Problematic Cannabis Use among Medical Cannabis Users AMERICAN JOURNAL OF DRUG AND ALCOHOL ABUSE Babson, K. A., Boden, M. T., Bonn-Miller, M. O. 2013; 39 (3): 211-216

    Abstract

    This study sought to extend research on the relation between depression symptoms and problematic cannabis use by evaluating the potential moderating role of perceived sleep quality among medical cannabis users.This employed a cross-sectional design. The sample consisted of 162 adults (mean age = 42.05 years, SD = 14.8; 22% female), with current recommendations from a doctor for medical cannabis, recruited from a medical cannabis dispensary.Consistent with previous research, individuals with heightened depression symptoms had greater problematic cannabis use. In addition, perceived sleep quality moderated this relation, such that depression symptoms differentially related to problematic cannabis use as a function of perceived quality of sleep (ΔR(2) = .03, p = .02). Participants with higher levels of depression and good perceived sleep quality had the greatest rates of problematic cannabis use.These results suggest that individuals with heightened depression may have higher rates of problematic cannabis use, in part, because of the beneficial effects of cannabis in terms of perceived sleep quality.

    View details for DOI 10.3109/00952990.2013.788183

    View details for Web of Science ID 000319742700010

    View details for PubMedID 23721537

  • Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Cannabis Use Characteristics among Military Veterans with Cannabis Dependence AMERICAN JOURNAL ON ADDICTIONS Boden, M. T., Babson, K. A., Vujanovic, A. A., Short, N. A., Bonn-Miller, M. O. 2013; 22 (3): 277-284

    Abstract

    The present study is the first to explore links between PTSD and cannabis use characteristics immediately prior to a cannabis quit attempt, including motives, use problems, withdrawal, and craving.Measures of PTSD diagnosis, symptom severity, and cannabis use characteristics were administered to a sample of cannabis dependent military veterans (n = 94). Hypotheses were tested with a series of analyses of variance and covariance and hierarchical multiple regressions with Bonferroni corrections. Analyses were conducted with and without adjusting for variance shared with substance use (cannabis, alcohol, tobacco) in the previous 90 days, and co-occurring mood, anxiety, and substance use diagnoses.Compared to participants without PTSD, participants with PTSD reported significantly increased: (a) use of cannabis to cope, (b) severity of cannabis withdrawal, and (c) experiences of craving related to compulsivity, emotionality, and anticipation, with findings regarding coping and craving remaining significant after adjusting for covariates. Among the total sample, PTSD symptom severity was positively associated with (a) use of cannabis to cope, (b) cannabis use problems, (c) severity of cannabis withdrawal, and (d) experiences of craving related to compulsivity and emotionality, with findings regarding withdrawal and emotion-related craving remaining significant after adjusting for covariates. Thus, links between PTSD and using cannabis to cope, severity of cannabis withdrawal, and especially craving appear robust across measures of PTSD and analytical method.The results of this study provide support for models that posit a pernicious feedback loop between PTSD symptomatology and cannabis use.

    View details for DOI 10.1111/j.1521-0391.2012.12018.x

    View details for Web of Science ID 000318232200016

    View details for PubMedID 23617872

  • Poor sleep quality as a risk factor for lapse following a cannabis quit attempt JOURNAL OF SUBSTANCE ABUSE TREATMENT Babson, K. A., Boden, M. T., Harris, A. H., Stickle, T. R., Bonn-Miller, M. O. 2013; 44 (4): 438-443

    Abstract

    Treatments for cannabis dependence are associated with high rates of lapse/relapse, underscoring the importance of identifying malleable risk factors that are associated with quit failure. Whereas research has demonstrated that poor sleep quality following cannabis discontinuation is related to subsequent use, there has yet to be an examination of whether poor sleep quality prior to a quit attempt results in a similar pattern of lapse. The present study addressed this gap by examining the role of pre-quit sleep quality on early lapse to cannabis use following a self-guided quit attempt, among 55 cannabis dependent military veterans. Results indicated that participants who experienced poor pre-quit sleep quality had greater risk for lapse within the first 2 days (out of 7) following their quit attempt. Findings are discussed in terms of improving treatments for individuals who report poor sleep quality prior to a cannabis quit attempt.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jsat.2012.08.224

    View details for Web of Science ID 000315426300011

    View details for PubMedID 23098380

  • The interactive effects of emotional clarity and cognitive reappraisal on problematic cannabis use among medical cannabis users ADDICTIVE BEHAVIORS Boden, M. T., Gross, J. J., Babson, K. A., Bonn-Miller, M. O. 2013; 38 (3): 1663-1668

    Abstract

    This study examined whether emotional clarity (i.e., the extent to which one can identify and understand the type and source of emotions one experiences) and cognitive reappraisal (i.e., altering how potentially emotion-eliciting situations are construed to change their emotional impact) would individually or jointly be associated with problematic cannabis use among individuals receiving cannabis for medical reasons (n=153). Findings indicated that problematic cannabis use was predicted by the interaction between emotional clarity and cognitive reappraisal. In particular, low levels of emotional clarity combined with high levels of cognitive reappraisal predicted problematic cannabis use. The current study is the first to demonstrate the interactive effects of emotional clarity and the use of cognitive reappraisal in predicting substance use disorder outcomes. Such findings are important given the lack of empirical data demonstrating for whom and for which conditions cannabis is either beneficial or detrimental.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.addbeh.2012.09.001

    View details for Web of Science ID 000315369800012

    View details for PubMedID 23254215

  • Anxiety Sensitivity and Sleep Quality Independent and Interactive Predictors of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms JOURNAL OF NERVOUS AND MENTAL DISEASE Babson, K. A., Boden, M. T., Woodward, S., Alvarez, J., Bonn-Miller, M. 2013; 201 (1): 48-51

    Abstract

    A cardinal feature of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is decreased sleep quality. Anxiety sensitivity (AS) is one factor that has shown early theoretical and empirical promise in better understanding the relation between sleep quality and PTSD outcomes. The current study is the first to test the independent and interactive effects of sleep quality and AS on PTSD symptoms. Consistent with hypotheses, AS and sleep quality were found to be independent and interactive predictors of PTSD symptom severity in our sample of male military veterans seeking treatment for PTSD. Slope analyses revealed that AS was differentially related to PTSD symptom severity as a function of quality of sleep. The veterans with good sleep quality and relatively lower levels of AS had the lowest level of PTSD symptoms, whereas the veterans with poor sleep quality and low AS evidenced severity of PTSD symptoms similar to those with high AS.

    View details for DOI 10.1097/NMD.0b013e31827ab059

    View details for Web of Science ID 000313028900008

    View details for PubMedID 23274295

  • The Relationship of Sleep Quality and PTSD to Anxious Reactivity from Idiographic Traumatic Event Script-Driven Imagery JOURNAL OF TRAUMATIC STRESS Babson, K. A., Badour, C. L., Feldner, M. T., Bunaciu, L. 2012; 25 (5): 503-510

    Abstract

    Poor sleep quality has been linked to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This study provided a test of how poor sleep quality relates to real-time assessment of anxious reactivity to idiographic traumatic event cues. Script-driven imagery (SDI) was employed to examine reactivity to traumatic event cues among 46 women (mean age = 27.54 years, SD = 13.62; 87% Caucasian) who had experienced either physical or sexual assault. We tested 3 hypotheses: (a) individuals with PTSD would report greater anxiety reactions to SDI than trauma-exposed individuals without PTSD, (b) poorer sleep quality would be positively related to anxiety reactions to SDI, and (c) there would be an interaction between PTSD and sleep quality such that individuals with PTSD and relatively poor sleep quality would report greater anxious reactivity to SDI than would be expected from each main effect alone. Poor sleep quality and PTSD were related to elevated anxious reactivity to trauma cues (sr(2) = .06). In addition, sleep quality was negatively associated with anxious reactivity among people without PTSD (sr(2) =.05). The current findings, in combination with longitudinal evidence, suggest that poor sleep quality following exposure to a traumatic event may be a risk factor for anxious reactivity to traumatic event cues.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/jts.21739

    View details for Web of Science ID 000310251500003

    View details for PubMedID 23047429

  • Posttraumatic stress and sleep: Differential relations across types of symptoms and sleep problems JOURNAL OF ANXIETY DISORDERS Babson, K., Feldner, M., Badour, C., Trainor, C., Blumenthal, H., Sachs-Ericsson, N., Schmidt, N. 2011; 25 (5): 706-713

    Abstract

    Posttraumatic stress symptoms and self-reported sleep problems reliably covary. The current study investigated how posttraumatic stress symptom clusters (i.e., hyperarousal, avoidance, and reexperiencing) relate to trouble initiating and maintaining sleep and nightmares. Participants included traumatic event-exposed respondents from the NCS-R. Results suggested that posttraumatic stress symptom severity is related to trouble initiating and maintaining sleep and nightmares. Investigation of symptom clusters indicated that reexperiencing symptoms were related to trouble initiating and maintaining sleep and nightmares, while hyperarousal symptoms were related to trouble maintaining sleep and nightmares. Findings partially support both reexperiencing and hyperarousal-based models of the relation between sleep and posttraumatic stress.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.janxdis.2011.03.007

    View details for Web of Science ID 000290595100013

    View details for PubMedID 21482065

  • A test of the effects of acute sleep deprivation on general and specific self-reported anxiety and depressive symptoms: An experimental extension JOURNAL OF BEHAVIOR THERAPY AND EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHIATRY Babson, K. A., Trainor, C. D., Feldner, M. T., Blumenthal, H. 2010; 41 (3): 297-303

    Abstract

    Evidence indicates acute sleep deprivation affects negative mood states. The present study experimentally tested the effects of acute sleep deprivation on self-reported symptoms of state anxiety and depression as well as general distress among 88 physically and psychologically healthy adults. As hypothesized, the effects of acute sleep deprivation increased state anxiety and depression, as well as general distress, relative to a normal night of sleep control condition. Based on the tripartite model of anxiety and depression, these findings replicate and extend prior research by suggesting sleep deprivation among individuals without current Axis I disorders increases both state symptoms of anxiety and depression specifically, and general distress more broadly. Extending this work to clinical samples and prospectively testing mechanisms underlying these effects are important future directions in this area of research.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jbtep.2010.02.008

    View details for Web of Science ID 000277482600018

    View details for PubMedID 20231014

  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Sleep Disorders PSYCHIATRIC CLINICS OF NORTH AMERICA Babson, K. A., Feldner, M. T., Badour, C. L. 2010; 33 (3): 629-?

    Abstract

    More than 70 million people in the United States experience primary insomnia (PI) at some point in their life, resulting in an estimated $65 billion in health care costs and lost productivity. PI is therefore one of the most common health care problems in the United States. To mollify the negative effects of PI, scholars have sought to evaluate and improve treatments of this costly health care problem. A breadth of research has demonstrated that cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is an effective intervention for PI. The goal of this article is to provide an overview of CBT for PI, including evidence regarding treatment efficacy, effectiveness, and practitioner considerations.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.psc.2010.04.011

    View details for Web of Science ID 000281367600010

    View details for PubMedID 20599137

  • Temporal relations between sleep problems and both traumatic event exposure and PTSD: A critical review of the empirical literature JOURNAL OF ANXIETY DISORDERS Babson, K. A., Feldner, M. T. 2010; 24 (1): 1-15

    Abstract

    There has been growing interest in the interrelations among traumatic event exposure, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and sleep problems. A wealth of research has examined the associations among these factors and there is an emerging literature focused on how sleep problems relate to both traumatic event exposure and PTSD across time. The current review provides a detailed analysis of studies pertaining to the temporal patterning of sleep problems and traumatic event-related factors (e.g., traumatic event exposure, PTSD) and draws conclusions regarding the current state of this literature. Research coalesces to suggest (1) exposure to a traumatic event can interfere with sleep, (2) PTSD is related to the development of self-reported sleep problems, but evidence is less clear regarding objective indices of sleep, and (3) limited evidence suggests sleep problems may interfere with recovery from elevated posttraumatic stress levels. Future research now needs to focus on understanding mechanisms involved in these patterns to inform the prevention and treatment of comorbid sleep problems and PTSD.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.janxdis.2009.08.002

    View details for Web of Science ID 000273506500001

    View details for PubMedID 19716676

  • An Experimental Investigation of the Effects of Acute Sleep Deprivation on Panic-Relevant Biological Challenge Responding BEHAVIOR THERAPY Babson, K. A., Feldner, M. T., Trainor, C. D., Smith, R. C. 2009; 40 (3): 239-250

    Abstract

    Prospective research indicates sleep deprivation potentiates anxiety development, yet relatively little research has examined the effects of sleep deprivation in terms of specific types of anxiety. The current study tested the association between acute sleep deprivation and panic-relevant biological challenge responding among nonclinical participants. One hundred and two participants were randomly assigned to either an experimental (acute sleep deprivation) or control (no sleep deprivation) group. The day prior to and following the experimental (sleep) manipulation, participants completed a 5-minute 10% carbon dioxide-enriched air laboratory-based biological challenge. As predicted, sleep deprivation increased anxious and fearful responding to the challenge. Findings suggest sleep deprivation may be an important factor to consider in models of panic development. There are several areas in this general domain that warrant additional investigation.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000270065800004

    View details for PubMedID 19647525

  • Nicotine dependence mediates the relations between insomnia and both panic and posttraumatic stress disorder in the NCS-R sample DEPRESSION AND ANXIETY Babson, K. A., Feldner, M. T., Sachs-Ericsson, N., Schmidt, N. B., Zvolensky, M. J. 2008; 25 (8): 670-679

    Abstract

    Although a growing literature has demonstrated elevations in insomnia symptoms among persons with either panic disorder (PD) or posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) relative to people without psychopathology, comparably little is known about processes underlying these associations. In recognition of this important gap in the literature, this study tested nicotine dependence as a partial mediator of the relations between insomnia symptoms and both PD and PTSD among a nationally representative sample of 5,692 (3,311 females; M(age)=43.33, SD=16.55) adults from the National Comorbidity Survey-Replication. Consistent with hypotheses, nicotine dependence partially mediated the relations between insomnia and both PD and PTSD after controlling for variance accounted for by diagnoses of major depressive episodes, drug and alcohol dependence, and gender. Overall, results suggest nicotine dependence may be a possible mechanism that underlies insomnia among those with PD and PTSD.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/da.20374

    View details for Web of Science ID 000258900900004

    View details for PubMedID 17935215

  • Disgust, mental contamination, and posttraumatic stress: Unique relations following sexual versus non-sexual assault JOURNAL OF ANXIETY DISORDERS Badour, C. L., Feldner, M. T., Babson, K. A., Blumenthal, H., Dutton, C. E. 2013; 27 (1): 155-162

    Abstract

    Disgust and mental contamination (or feelings of dirtiness and urges to wash in the absence of a physical contaminant) are increasingly being linked to traumatic event exposure and posttraumatic stress (PTS) symptomatology. Evidence suggests disgust and mental contamination are particularly relevant to sexual assault experiences; however, there has been relatively little direct examination of these relations. The primary aim of the current study was to assess disgust and mental contamination-based reactivity to an individualized interpersonal assault-related script-driven imagery procedure. Participants included 22 women with a history of traumatic sexual assault and 19 women with a history of traumatic non-sexual assault. Sexual assault and PTS symptom severity predicted greater increases in disgust, feelings of dirtiness, and urges to wash in response to the traumatic event script. Finally, assault type affected the association between PTS symptom severity and increases in feelings of dirtiness and urges to wash in response to the traumatic event script such that these associations were only significant among sexually assaulted individuals. These findings highlight the need for future research focused on elucidating the nature of the relation between disgust and mental contamination and PTS reactions following various traumatic events.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.janxdis.2012.11.002

    View details for Web of Science ID 000315430700019

    View details for PubMedID 23376603

  • Sleep Quality Among U.S. Military Veterans With PTSD: A Factor Analysis and Structural Model of Symptoms JOURNAL OF TRAUMATIC STRESS Babson, K. A., Blonigen, D. M., Boden, M. T., Drescher, K. D., Bonn-Miller, M. O. 2012; 25 (6): 665-674

    Abstract

    Poor sleep quality among individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with poorer prognosis and outcomes. The factor structure of the most commonly employed measure of self-reported sleep quality, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), has yet to be evaluated among individuals with PTSD. The current study sought to fill this gap among a sample of 226 U.S. military veterans with PTSD (90% with co-occurring mood disorders, 73.5% with substance use disorders). We evaluated the factor structure of the PSQI by conducting an exploratory factor analysis (EFA) in approximately half of the sample (n = 111). We then conducted a second EFA in the other split half (n = 115). Lastly, we conducted a path analysis to investigate the relations between sleep factors and PTSD symptom severity, after accounting for the relation with depression. Results suggested sleep quality can best be conceptualized, among those with PTSD, as a multidimensional construct consisting of 2 factors, Perceived Sleep Quality and Efficiency/Duration. After accounting for the association between both factors and depression, only the Perceived Sleep Quality factor was associated with PTSD (? = .51). The results provide a recommended structure that improves precision in measuring sleep quality among veterans with PTSD.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/jts.21757

    View details for Web of Science ID 000312151400008

    View details for PubMedID 23225033

  • Specificity of Peritraumatic Fear in Predicting Anxious Reactivity to a Biological Challenge among Traumatic Event-Exposed Adolescents COGNITIVE THERAPY AND RESEARCH Badour, C. L., Feldner, M. T., Blumenthal, H., Bujarski, S. J., Leen-Feldner, E. W., Babson, K. A. 2012; 36 (4): 397-406
  • Biological sex and panic-relevant anxious reactivity to abrupt increases in bodily arousal as a function of biological challenge intensity JOURNAL OF BEHAVIOR THERAPY AND EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHIATRY Bunaciu, L., Feldner, M. T., Babson, K. A., Zvolensky, M. J., Eifert, G. H. 2012; 43 (1): 526-531

    Abstract

    An emerging pattern of results from panic-relevant biological challenge studies suggests women respond with greater subjective anxiety than men, but only to relatively abrupt and intense challenge procedures. The current investigation examined the relation between biological sex and self-reported anxious reactivity following biological challenges of varying durations and intensity. Participants were 285 (152 females; M(age) = 21.38; SD = 5.92) nonclinical adults who completed one of three protocols: a 3-min voluntary hyperventilation challenge (VH), a 5-min 10% carbon dioxide-enriched air (CO(2)) challenge, or a 25-s 20% CO(2) challenge. As predicted, results indicated that the 20% CO(2) challenge elicited greater self-reported anxiety than the VH and 10% CO(2) challenges. Moreover, women endorsed greater anxious reactivity than men, but only following the 20% CO(2) challenge. Results are discussed in terms of processes likely to account for sex differences in anxious reactivity following relatively abrupt and intense biological challenges.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jbtep.2011.07.001

    View details for Web of Science ID 000297083300002

    View details for PubMedID 21813084

  • Marijuana use among traumatic event-exposed adolescents: Posttraumatic stress symptom frequency predicts coping motivations for use ADDICTIVE BEHAVIORS Bujarski, S. J., Feldner, M. T., Lewis, S. F., Babson, K. A., Trainor, C. D., Leen-Feldner, E., Badour, C. L., Bonn-Miller, M. O. 2012; 37 (1): 53-59

    Abstract

    Contemporary comorbidity theory postulates that people suffering from posttraumatic stress symptoms may use substances to cope with negative affect generally and posttraumatic stress symptoms specifically. The present study involves the examination of the unique relation between past two-week posttraumatic stress symptom frequency and motives for marijuana use after accounting for general levels of negative affectivity as well as variability associated with gender. Participants were 61 marijuana-using adolescents (M(age)=15.81) who reported experiencing lifetime exposure to at least one traumatic event. Consistent with predictions, past two-week posttraumatic stress symptoms significantly predicted coping motives for marijuana use and were not associated with social, enhancement, or conformity motives for use. These findings are consistent with theoretical work suggesting people suffering from posttraumatic stress use substances to regulate symptoms.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.addbeh.2011.08.009

    View details for Web of Science ID 000297532700007

    View details for PubMedID 21958588

  • The emotional Stroop task and posttraumatic stress disorder: A meta-analysis CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY REVIEW Cisler, J. M., Wolitzky-Taylor, K. B., Adams, T. G., Babson, K. A., Badour, C. L., Willems, J. L. 2011; 31 (5): 817-828

    Abstract

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with significant impairment and lowered quality of life. The emotional Stroop task (EST) has been one means of elucidating some of the core deficits in PTSD, but this literature has remained inconsistent. We conducted a meta-analysis of EST studies in PTSD populations in order to synthesize this body of research. Twenty-six studies were included with 538 PTSD participants, 254 non-trauma exposed control participants (NTC), and 276 trauma exposed control participants (TC). PTSD-relevant words impaired EST performance more among PTSD groups and TC groups compared to NTC groups. PTSD groups and TC groups did not differ. When examining within-subject effect sizes, PTSD-relevant words and generally threatening words impaired EST performance relative to neutral words among PTSD groups, and only PTSD-relevant words impaired performance among the TC groups. These patterns were not found among the NTC groups. Moderator analyses suggested that these effects were significantly greater in blocked designs compared to randomized designs, toward unmasked compared to masked stimuli, and among samples exposed to assaultive traumas compared to samples exposed to non-assaultive traumas. Theoretical and clinical implications are discussed.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.cpr.2011.03.007

    View details for Web of Science ID 000291188800010

    View details for PubMedID 21545780

  • Elevated Social Anxiety Among Early Maturing Girls DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY Blumenthal, H., Leen-Feldner, E. W., Babson, K. A., Gahr, J. L., Trainor, C. D., Frala, J. L. 2011; 47 (4): 1133-1140

    Abstract

    Adolescence is a key period in terms of the development of anxiety psychopathology. An emerging literature suggests that early pubertal maturation is associated with enhanced vulnerability for anxiety symptomatology, although few studies have examined this association with regard to social anxiety. Accordingly, the current study was designed to further elucidate the relation between pubertal timing and social anxiety, with a focus on clarifying the role of gender. Participants were 138 adolescents (ages 12-17 years) recruited from the general community. Level of social anxiety was examined as a function of gender and within-sample pubertal timing. As expected, early maturing girls evidenced significantly higher social anxiety, compared with on-time girls and early maturing boys, and no other differences were found as a function of gender or developmental timing. Findings and future directions are discussed in terms of forwarding developmentally sensitive models of social anxiety etiology and prevention.

    View details for DOI 10.1037/a0024008

    View details for Web of Science ID 000292481800023

    View details for PubMedID 21604866

  • A test of the relations between avoidance of panic-related situations and substance use, substance dependence, and depression among subclinical panickers BEHAVIOUR RESEARCH AND THERAPY Bunaciu, L., Feldner, M. T., Blumenthal, H., Babson, K. A., Schmidt, N. B., Sachs-Ericsson, N. 2010; 48 (2): 158-163

    Abstract

    The hypotheses that among subclinical panickers, avoidance of panic-related situations would be associated with elevated substance use levels and increased likelihood of lifetime diagnoses of substance dependence and major depressive disorder (MDD) were tested. Findings confirmed that panic-related avoidance was associated with an elevated likelihood of lifetime diagnoses of nicotine and alcohol dependence as well as MDD, but not drug dependence. Panic avoidance was also related to relatively greater daily levels of cigarette and alcohol use.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.brat.2009.10.001

    View details for Web of Science ID 000275217900010

    View details for PubMedID 19857860

  • Sleep Problems and PTSD Symptoms Interact to Predict Marijuana Use Coping Motives: A Preliminary Investigation JOURNAL OF DUAL DIAGNOSIS Bonn-Miller, M. O., Babson, K. A., Vujanovic, A. A., Feldner, M. T. 2010; 6 (2): 111-122
  • Gender as a moderator of the relation between PTSD and disgust: A laboratory test employing individualized script-driven imagery JOURNAL OF ANXIETY DISORDERS Olatunji, B. O., Babson, K. A., Smith, R. C., Feldner, M. T., Connolly, K. M. 2009; 23 (8): 1091-1097

    Abstract

    The present study examines anxiety and disgust responding during exposure to trauma cues as a function of gender and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Trauma exposed adults without PTSD were compared to adults with PTSD during a script-driven imagery procedure that exposed each participant to individualized traumatic event cues. Anxiety responding during exposure to an individualized traumatic event script was not associated with gender, PTSD, or interaction of gender and PTSD in the present study. However, gender did moderate the relation between disgust responding and PTSD, such that females with PTSD reported more disgust during the script in comparison to females without PTSD and males with and without PTSD. Heart rate during the individualized trauma script was significantly higher among males with PTSD compared to males without PTSD and females with PTSD. Implications of these findings for conceptualizing how gender differences in emotional and physiological responding contribute to development and course of PTSD are discussed.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.janxdis.2009.07.012

    View details for Web of Science ID 000271053100011

    View details for PubMedID 19647980

  • Anxiety sensitivity and CO2 challenge anxiety during recovery: Differential correspondence of arousal and perceived control JOURNAL OF ANXIETY DISORDERS Olatunji, B. O., Wolitzky-Taylor, K. B., Babson, K. A., Feldner, M. T. 2009; 23 (4): 420-428

    Abstract

    The relations between changes in arousal and perceived control with changes in anxiety-related distress during a 10-min recovery period after exposure to 10% CO(2)-enriched air was examined among community participants (N=47) high (n=23) and low (n=24) in anxiety sensitivity (AS). Rate of decline in arousal was significantly positively associated with rate of decline in anxiety among high and low AS participants when controlling for valence. Rate of increase in perceived control was significantly negatively related to rate of decline in anxiety in the high AS group but not in the low AS group when controlling for valence. These findings suggest that associations between arousal, perceived control, and anxiety-related recovery from a panic-relevant episode of abrupt increases in bodily arousal differ as a function of pre-existing fears of anxiety-related symptoms (i.e., AS). Implications of these findings for disorders associated with elevated AS are discussed.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.janxdis.2008.08.006

    View details for Web of Science ID 000265035300002

    View details for PubMedID 18835694

  • Interactive Roles of Pubertal Timing and Peer Relations in Predicting Social Anxiety Symptoms Among Youth JOURNAL OF ADOLESCENT HEALTH Blumenthal, H., Leen-Feldner, E. W., Trainor, C. D., Babson, K. A., Bunaciu, L. 2009; 44 (4): 401-403

    Abstract

    The interaction between early maturation and problematic peer relations in relation to social anxiety symptoms was examined among 167 adolescents aged 10-17 years. Results indicated that early-maturing youth with problematic peer relations evidenced elevated social anxiety symptoms. Findings are discussed in terms of theoretical implications for adolescent social anxiety development.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2008.08.023

    View details for Web of Science ID 000264778400014

    View details for PubMedID 19306800

  • Test of the Role of Nicotine Dependence in the Relation Between Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Panic Spectrum Problems JOURNAL OF TRAUMATIC STRESS Feldner, M. T., Smith, R. C., Babson, K. A., Sachs-Ericsson, N., Schmidt, N. B., Zvolensky, M. J. 2009; 22 (1): 36-44

    Abstract

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) frequently co-occurs with panic spectrum problems. Relatively little empirical work has tested possible mechanisms accounting for this association. Nicotine dependence often ensues subsequent to PTSD onset and research suggests smoking high numbers of cigarettes daily may lead to panic problems. The current study tested the hypotheses that nicotine dependence partially mediates the relations between PTSD and both panic attacks and panic disorder within a nationally representative sample of 5,692 (3,020 women; M(Age) = 45, SD = 18) adults from the National Comorbidity Survey-Replication. Results were consistent with hypotheses. These findings support the theory suggesting smoking among people with PTSD may be involved in the development of panic problems.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/jts.20384

    View details for Web of Science ID 000263888500006

    View details for PubMedID 19177490

  • An integrated approach to panic prevention targeting the empirically supported risk factors of smoking and anxiety sensitivity: Theoretical basis and evidence from a pilot project evaluating feasibility and short-term efficacy JOURNAL OF ANXIETY DISORDERS Feldner, M. T., Zvolensky, M. J., Babson, K., Leen-Feldner, E. W., Schmidt, N. B. 2008; 22 (7): 1227-1243

    Abstract

    Consistent with a risk reduction model of targeted prevention, the present investigation piloted and empirically evaluated the feasibility and short-term efficacy of a first-generation panic prevention program that targeted two malleable risk factors for panic development-anxiety sensitivity and daily cigarette smoking. Members of a high risk cohort, defined by high levels of anxiety sensitivity and current daily smoking (n=96), were randomly assigned to either (1) a one session intervention focused on proximally increasing motivation to quit smoking and reducing anxiety sensitivity to distally prevent the development of panic or (2) a health information control condition of comparable length. Participants were followed for 6 months. Consistent with hypotheses, those in the treatment condition showed reduced anxiety sensitivity and this effect was maintained across the follow-up period. Limited evidence also suggested the intervention increased motivation to quit smoking. We discuss how this prevention protocol can be modified in the future to enhance its effects as part of second-generation larger-scale outcome evaluations.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.janxdis.2008.01.005

    View details for Web of Science ID 000259110700013

    View details for PubMedID 18281190

  • Parenting-related childhood learning history and panic vulnerability: A test using a laboratory-based biological challenge procedure BEHAVIOUR RESEARCH AND THERAPY Leen-Feldner, E. W., Blumenthal, H., Babson, K., Bunaciu, L., Feldner, M. T. 2008; 46 (9): 1009-1016

    Abstract

    A small but growing literature highlights specific parenting behaviors in increasing panic vulnerability among offspring. The current study examined the association between parenting-related instrumental and observational learning of sick-role behavior during childhood and reactivity to a panic-relevant biological challenge procedure that has evidenced predictive validity in terms of panic onset. Participants were 93 physically and psychologically healthy young adults (39 females; M(age)=23.41 years). As expected, results indicated that instrumental learning experiences involving (panic-relevant) arousal-reactive symptoms predicted increased post-challenge anxiety, arousal, and negative affective valence, even after accounting for variability associated with other theoretically relevant variables (e.g., anxiety sensitivity). Consistent with prior work, this learning history effect was specific to arousal-reactive, as opposed to arousal non-reactive, symptoms. Unexpectedly, observational learning was not related to challenge responding. Findings are discussed in terms of the potential role of parenting in etiologic models of panic development.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.brat.2008.06.002

    View details for Web of Science ID 000259833000004

    View details for PubMedID 18675403

  • The moderating role of health fear on the relation between smoking status and panic symptoms among adolescents JOURNAL OF ANXIETY DISORDERS Leen-Feldner, E. W., Blanchard, L., Babson, K., Reardon, L. E., Bacon, A. K., Zvolensky, M. J. 2008; 22 (5): 772-780

    Abstract

    The present study examined the moderating role of health fear on the concurrent relation between smoking status and panic attack symptoms among 249 adolescents (132 females, M(age)=14.86 years). As hypothesized, youth high in health fear reported elevations in panic attack symptoms, whereas this relation was relatively weak among those low in health fear. Importantly, these associations were significant after controlling for age, gender, negative affectivity, and anxiety sensitivity. Also as expected, health fear did not moderate the association between smoking status and depressive symptoms, supporting model specificity. Results are discussed in terms of implications for the panic-smoking association among youth.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.janxdis.2007.08.004

    View details for Web of Science ID 000256189100002

    View details for PubMedID 17884329

  • Anxiety sensitivity and posttraumatic stress among traumatic event-exposed youth BEHAVIOUR RESEARCH AND THERAPY Leen-Feldner, E. W., Feldner, M. T., Reardon, L. E., Babson, K. A., Dixon, L. 2008; 46 (4): 548-556

    Abstract

    Total and factor scores of the Childhood Anxiety Sensitivity Index (CASI) were examined in relation to posttraumatic stress symptom levels within a community-based sample of 68 (43 females) traumatic event-exposed youth between the ages of 10 and 17 years (M age=14.74 years). Findings were consistent with hypotheses; global anxiety sensitivity (AS) levels, as well as disease, unsteady, and mental incapacitation concerns, related positively to posttraumatic stress levels, whereas social concerns were unrelated to symptom levels. These results suggest that fears of the physical and mental consequences of anxiety are associated with relatively higher levels of posttraumatic stress subsequent to traumatic event exposure. Findings are discussed in terms of potential implications for the role of AS in developmentally sensitive etiological models of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.brat.2008.01.014

    View details for Web of Science ID 000255316200012

    View details for PubMedID 18328463

  • An examination of anxiety sensitivity as a moderator of the relationship between smoking level and posttraumatic stress symptoms among trauma-exposed adults COGNITIVE THERAPY AND RESEARCH Feldner, M. T., Babson, K. A., Zvolensky, M. J., Monson, C. M., Bonn-Miller, M. O., Gibson, L. E. 2008; 32 (1): 116-132
  • Posttraumatic stress symptoms and smoking to reduce negative affect: An investigation of trauma-exposed daily smokers ADDICTIVE BEHAVIORS Feldner, M. T., Babson, K. A., Zvolensky, M. J., Vujanovic, A. A., Lewis, S. F., Gibson, L. E., Monson, C. M., Bernstein, A. 2007; 32 (2): 214-227

    Abstract

    The present investigation examined the relations among posttraumatic stress symptoms and smoking motives. Participants included 100 daily smokers recruited from the community and university settings who reported exposure to at least one traumatic event that met criterion A for posttraumatic stress disorder. Consistent with prediction, higher levels of posttraumatic stress symptoms were associated with smoking to reduce negative affect; this relation was observed after controlling for variance accounted for by number of cigarettes smoked per day and gender. Results are discussed in terms of the implications of smoking to regulate affect among daily smokers who have been exposed to traumatic events.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.addbeh.2006.03.032

    View details for Web of Science ID 000243667200002

    View details for PubMedID 16644135

  • Smoking, traumatic event exposure, and post-traumatic stress: A critical review of the empirical literature CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY REVIEW Feldner, M. T., Babson, K. A., Zvolensky, M. J. 2007; 27 (1): 14-45

    Abstract

    The current review critically examines the extant empirical literature focused on the associations among cigarette smoking, trauma, and post-traumatic stress. Inspection of the extant literature suggests that smoking rates are significantly higher among persons exposed to a traumatic event relative to those without such exposure. Moreover, smoking rates appear particularly high among persons with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In terms of the direction of this relation, evidence most clearly suggests that post-traumatic stress is involved in the development of smoking. Significantly less is known about the role of trauma and PTSD in terms of cessation outcome. Limitations of extant work, clinical implications, and key directions for future study are delineated.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.cpr.2006.08.004

    View details for Web of Science ID 000243712000002

    View details for PubMedID 17034916

  • The interactive role of anxiety sensitivity and pubertal status in predicting anxious responding to bodily sensations among adolescents JOURNAL OF ABNORMAL CHILD PSYCHOLOGY Leen-Feldner, E. W., Reardon, L. E., McKee, L. G., Feldner, M. T., Babson, K. A., Zvolensky, M. J. 2006; 34 (6): 799-812

    Abstract

    The present study examined the interaction between pubertal status and anxiety sensitivity (AS) in predicting anxious and fearful responding to a three-minute voluntary hyperventilation challenge among 124 (57 females) adolescents between the ages of 12 and 17 years (Mage = 15.04; SD = 1.49). As predicted, after controlling for baseline anxiety, age, and gender, there was a significant interaction between pubertal status and AS in predicting anxious responding to bodily sensations to the hyperventilation challenge. Specifically, adolescents reporting more advanced pubertal status and higher levels of AS reported the greatest post-challenge self-reported anxiety focused on bodily sensations, whereas pubertal status had relatively less of an effect on low AS adolescents. A test of specificity also was conducted; as expected, the interaction between AS and pubertal status was unrelated to generalized negative affectivity, suggesting the predictor variables interact to confer specific risk for anxious responding to bodily sensations. Finally, exploratory analyses of psychophysiological reactivity to the challenge indicated AS, but not pubertal status, moderated the relation between challenge-related change in heart-rate and post-challenge anxiety such that high AS youth who had experienced a relatively greater heart-rate change reported the most anxious reactivity to the challenge. Results are discussed in relation to theory regarding vulnerability to anxious responding to bodily sensations among adolescents.

    View details for DOI 10.1007/s10802-006-9079-y

    View details for Web of Science ID 000242434800004

    View details for PubMedID 17115272

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