Bio

Clinical Focus


  • Neuropsychiatry
  • Behavioral Neurology
  • Non-epileptic Seizures
  • Cognitive Behavior Therapy
  • Dialectical Behavior Therapy
  • Functional Neurological Symptom Disorder
  • Conversion Disorder
  • Psychiatry

Academic Appointments


Honors & Awards


  • Special Thanks and Recognition Award, Palo Alto Veterans Administration (July 1998)
  • Donald Glew Award for Student Research, George Washington University (1994)
  • William Beaumont Society Research Award, William Beaumont Society Research Award, George Washington University (1990)
  • Chancellor's Leadership Award, University of California, San Diego (1989)
  • Departmental Honors with Distinction in Psychology, University of California, San Diego (1989)

Professional Education


  • Medical Education:George Washington University Medical School (1994) DC
  • Residency:Stanford University School of Medicine (2002) CA
  • Subspecialty, United Council for Neurologic Subspecialties, Behavioral Neurology & Neuropsychiatry (2012)
  • Board Certification: Psychiatry, American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology (2006)
  • Internship:Washington Hospital Center (1995) DC
  • Residency, Stanford University, Psychiatry (2002)
  • Internship, Washington Hospital Center, Internal Medicine (1995)
  • MD, George Washington University, Medicine (1994)
  • BA, University of California, Animal Physiology (1989)
  • BA, University of California, Psychology (1989)

Community and International Work


  • National Alliance for the Mentally Ill

    Topic

    NAMI walk

    Location

    US

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    Yes

  • Peninsula Community Services, San Mateo

    Populations Served

    families and patients with hoarding behaviors

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    Yes

  • Physicians for Social Responsibility

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

  • Team in Training

    Partnering Organization(s)

    Leukemia and Lymphoma Society

    Ongoing Project

    No

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

Research & Scholarship

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


I am interested in combining technology and evidenced based psychotherapies to treat mental illness. My current focus is on the development of innovative modalities to effectively treat Functional Neurological Symptom Disorder. My current work is investigating the application and efficacy of dialectical behavior therapy for conversion disorder.

Clinical Trials


  • Treatment Trial for Psychogenic Nonepileptic Seizures Recruiting

    The investigators propose that patients who receive targeted pharmacotherapy (sertraline) or focused psychotherapy (cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for NES) or combined treatment (CBT + sertraline) will report fewer nonepileptic seizures (NES) compared to patients who receive community care / treatment as usual (TAU). The purpose of this study is to provide pilot testing and data to inform the future multicenter randomized controlled trial based on the hypothesis.

    View full details

Teaching

2010-11 Courses


Publications

Journal Articles


  • Ethics Commentary: Ethical Considerations in Caring for People Living With Addictions Focus Laura Weiss Roberts 2011; 9: 66-69
  • Group therapy for patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures: A pilot study EPILEPSY & BEHAVIOR Barry, J. J., Wittenberg, D., Bullock, K. D., Michaels, J. B., Classen, C. C., Fisher, R. S. 2008; 13 (4): 624-629

    Abstract

    Great advances have been made in the diagnosis of people with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) since the advent of video/EEG monitoring. However, treatment options for this population have lagged significantly. This pilot study was undertaken to evaluate whether group therapy done with a psychodynamic focus would offer a useful intervention. Twelve patients entered the study and seven completed at least 75% of the 32 weekly sessions. The Beck Depression Inventory and the Global Severity Index of the Symptom Checklist-90 showed improvement as well as an overall decrease in PNES frequency. The data suggest that group therapy focusing on interpersonal issues may benefit patients with PNES.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.yebeh.2008.06.013

    View details for Web of Science ID 000260701500008

    View details for PubMedID 18621147

  • Double-blind treatment with oral morphine in treatment-resistant obsessive-compulsive disorder JOURNAL OF CLINICAL PSYCHIATRY Koran, L. M., Aboujaoude, E., Bullock, K. D., Franz, B., Gamel, N., Elliott, M. 2005; 66 (3): 353-359

    Abstract

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) often responds inadequately to serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs). A case series reported substantial response to once-weekly oral morphine. We conducted a placebo-controlled, double-blind trial to investigate whether once-weekly oral morphine is effective in SRI-resistant OCD.Subjects with DSM-IV-defined OCD for > or =3 years who had failed > or =2 adequate SRI trials and had a Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS) score of > or =20 were recruited. Current medications were continued. Subjects were randomly assigned to random-order, 2-week blocks of once-weekly morphine, lorazepam, and placebo. Week 2 dosage was increased, decreased, or maintained depending on response and side effects.We enrolled 23 subjects, who had failed 2 to 6 SRI trials. The median screening Y-BOCS score was 29. The median Y-BOCS score after morphine (highest dose) was 25 (median decrease = 13%). Seven subjects (30%) were responders (Y-BOCS decreases > or =25%). The median Y-BOCS score after lorazepam (highest dose) was 27 (median decrease = 6%). Four subjects (17%) responded to lorazepam; 1 was a morphine responder. The median Y-BOCS score after placebo (highest dose) was 27 (median decrease = 7%), and no subject responded. Responses differed significantly among the 3 conditions (Friedman 2-way analysis of variance, chir(2) = 13.92, df = 2, p = .01). Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-rank tests (T = 56.5, p = .05) showed significance for morphine versus placebo but not lorazepam versus placebo.Our results support the hypothesis that once-weekly oral morphine can reduce symptoms in some treatment-resistant OCD patients. The mechanism of action is unknown. Further studies of mu-agonists and glutamate antagonists are warranted.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000227744700011

    View details for PubMedID 15766302

  • Doubl-blind, 0nce-weekly Oral Morphine in Treatment Resistant Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry Koran, L., Elias Aboujaoude, Kim Bullock, Nona Gamel 2005
  • Current status of the utilization of antiepileptic treatments in mood, anxiety and aggression: Drugs and devices CLINICAL EEG AND NEUROSCIENCE Barry, J. J., Lembke, A., Bullock, K. D. 2004; 35 (1): 4-13

    Abstract

    Interventions that have been utilized to control seizures in people with epilepsy have been employed by the psychiatric community to treat a variety of disorders. The purpose of this review will be to give an overview of the most prominent uses of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and devices like the Vagus Nerve Stimulator (VNS) and Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) in the treatment of psychiatric disease states. By far, the most prevalent use of these interventions is in the treatment of mood disorders. AEDs have become a mainstay in the effective treatment of Bipolar Affective Disorder (BAD). The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the use of valproic acid for acute mania, and lamotrigine for BAD maintenance therapy. AEDs are also effectively employed in the treatment of anxiety and aggressive disorders. Finally, VNS and TMS are emerging as possibly useful tools in the treatment of more refractory depressive illness.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000223764000002

    View details for PubMedID 15112459

  • Group psychotherpy for patients with non-epileptic seizures: a pilot study (abstract). Epilepsia Wittenberg D, Michaels J, Ford C, Bullock K, Barry JJ 2004; 45 (Suppl. 7): 57-8
  • Citalopram for compulsive shopping disorder: An open-label study followed by double-blind discontinuation JOURNAL OF CLINICAL PSYCHIATRY Koran, L. M., Chuong, H. W., Bullock, K. D., Smith, S. C. 2003; 64 (7): 793-798

    Abstract

    Open-label trials suggested that fluvoxamine and citalopram may be effective for compulsive shopping disorder, but 2 double-blind fluvoxamine trials failed to confirm this. To test the hypothesis that citalopram is a safe, effective treatment for this disorder, we conducted a 7-week, open-label trial followed by a 9-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled discontinuation trial.From Jan. 2001 to Jan. 2002, we enrolled adult outpatients meeting diagnostic criteria suggested in a prior study for compulsive shopping disorder and having a score of >/= 17 on the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale-Shopping Version (YBOCS-SV). Open-label citalopram was started at 20 mg/day and increased, absent marked response and limiting side effects, to 60 mg/day. Responders (subjects rated "much improved" or "very much improved" on the Clinical Global Impressions-Improvement scale [CGI-I] and having a >/= 50% decrease in YBOCS-SV score) were randomized to double-blind citalopram treatment at the week 7 dose or placebo for 9 weeks.We enrolled 24 subjects (23 women and 1 man). Mean +/- SD YBOCS-SV scores decreased significantly from 24.3 +/- 4.6 at baseline to 8.2 +/- 8.1 at week 7 (Wilcoxon signed rank: z = 4.20, p <.001). Fifteen of 24 subjects (63%) met the responder criteria. Three subjects (13%) discontinued for adverse events (1 each for headache, rash, and insomnia). Of the 15 responders who entered the double-blind treatment phase, 5 of 8 (63%) randomized to placebo relapsed (YBOCS-SV score >/= 17 and "minimally improved" or less on the CGI-I) compared with none of 7 randomized to continue taking citalopram (Fisher exact test p =.019).Citalopram appears to be a safe and effective treatment for compulsive shopping disorder. Further trials of citalopram and other selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are warranted.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000184233600009

    View details for PubMedID 12934980

  • Psychopharmacology of compulsive buying Drugs of Today Bullock KD, Koran LM 2003; 39 (9): 695-700
  • Citalopram treatment of compulsive shopping: An open-label study JOURNAL OF CLINICAL PSYCHIATRY Koran, L. M., Bullock, K. D., Hartston, H. J., Elliott, M. A., D'Andrea, V. 2002; 63 (8): 704-708

    Abstract

    Compulsive shopping, a DSM-IV impulse-control disorder not otherwise specified, is characterized by preoccupation with shopping and inability to resist buying unneeded items, with resulting marked distress, social or occupational impairment, and financial and/or familial problems. Because an open-label trial suggested that fluovaxamine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), is effective for this disorder, we tested the effectiveness of the SSRI citalopram.We enrolled adults meeting formal diagnostic criteria (as defined by McElroy and colleagues) in a 12-week open-label trial. We excluded subjects with obsessive-compulsive disorder, bipolar disorder, substance abuse or dependence, or psychotic disorders. Citalopram treatment was begun at 20 mg/day and increased every 2 weeks by 20 mg/day, absent marked response and limiting side effects, to 60 mg/day. At endpoint, all subjects were asked to give written informed consent for follow-up telephone interviews at 3-month intervals for 12 months.We enrolled 24 subjects, 22 women and 2 men, whose mean +/- SD age was 43.7 +/- 8.1 years; most had been shopping compulsively for 2 decades or more. Citalopram (mean +/- SD endpoint dose = 35.4 +/- 21.4 mg/day) produced rapid, marked, sustained improvements on both the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale-Shopping Version and the Clinical Global Impressions-Improvement (CGI-I) scale in subjects with and without comorbid conditions. Seventeen subjects (71%) were responders, achieving ratings of much or very much improved on the CGI-I, including 2 of the 3 subjects who discontinued for adverse events (sedation or agitation). During a 6-month follow-up period, those continuing citalopram therapy were less likely to relapse than those discontinuing the medication.Citalopram appears to be a safe and effective treatment for compulsive shopping. Acute and long-term, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of citalopram and other SSRIs for the treatment of this disorder are indicated.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000177510300008

    View details for PubMedID 12197451

  • REDUCED MORTALITY RISK IN ALCOHOLICS WHO ACHIEVE LONG-TERM ABSTINENCE JAMA-JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION Bullock, K. D., Reed, R. J., Grant, I. 1992; 267 (5): 668-672

    Abstract

    To determine if alcoholic men who achieved stable abstinence experienced fewer deaths than those who relapsed and to develop a model predictive of premature mortality.A cohort of alcoholic men recruited into a prospective study of neurocognitive effects of alcoholism was followed up from 1 through 11 years. A demographically equated group of nonalcoholic men was also followed up. Alcoholics were classified as stable abstainers or relapsers.Alcoholics were patients or ex-patients from a Department of Veterans Affairs Alcoholism Treatment Program and/or members of local chapters of Alcoholics Anonymous.There were 234 alcoholic men who met the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Third Edition, criteria for alcohol dependence. Follow-up status regarding relapse and mortality was obtained for 199 alcoholic subjects (85%). Of these, 101 had relapsed and 98 had abstained. Ninety-eight nonalcoholic controls equated for age, education, and sex also participated. Mortality status was obtained for 92 subjects in this group (94%).Major medical and psychiatric illness and history of nonalcoholic drug abuse.Death during a follow-up period of 1 through 11 years. Death was ascertained through the National Death Index, the California State Department of Health and Vital Statistics, the State Department of Motor Vehicles, and through personal contact with informants, relatives, and significant others of the subjects.There were 19 deaths among relapsed alcoholics compared with the expected number of 3.83 (99% confidence interval (CI), 9.64 to 33.38). Among abstinent alcoholics there were four deaths (expected = 3.21; 99% CI, 0.67 to 12.59). The standardized mortality ratio for relapsed alcoholics was 4.96, which significantly exceeded the expected ratio (P less than .001), whereas the standardized mortality ratio for abstinent alcoholics (1.25) was indistinguishable from the expected. Cox proportional hazards analysis was used to determine if any of several demographic, medical, cognitive, or drinking history variables (in addition to relapse) helped predict mortality among alcoholics. Only relapse was significantly related to increased mortality (chi 2 = 9.15, P = .003).Alcoholic men who achieve stable abstinence do not differ from nonalcoholic men in mortality experience; however, alcoholics who relapse die at a rate 4.96 times that of an age-, sex-, and race-matched representative sample from the US Bureau of the Census.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1992HB35400023

    View details for PubMedID 1731133

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