Bio

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Hospitalist, Stanford University Medical Center (2005 - Present)
  • Hospitalist, Inova Fairfax Hospital (2004 - 2005)
  • Assistant Professor of Medicine, Georgetown University School of Medicine (2004 - 2005)
  • Hospitalist, Walter Reed Army Medical Center (2002 - 2004)
  • Associate Program Director, Transitional Internship, Inova Fairfax Hospital (2002 - 2004)
  • Assistant Professor of Medicine, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (2002 - 2004)
  • Course Director, Evidence-Based Medicine Curriculum, Walter Reed Army Medical Center (2002 - 2004)
  • Medical Director, Inpatient Medical Ward, Walter Reed Army Medical Center (2002 - 2004)
  • Hospitalist, Santa Clara Valley Medical Center (1998 - 2002)
  • Assistant Chief, Division of Primary Care, Santa Clara Valley Medical Center (1998 - 2002)
  • Staff Physician, Department of Veteran’s Affairs, Palo Alto (1996 - 1998)

Professional Education


  • BS, UCLA, Kinesiology (1987)
  • MS, UCLA, Kinesiology (1989)
  • MD, USC School of Medicine, Medicine (1993)
  • Residency, Stanford Univ Medical Center, Medicine (1996)

Teaching

2013-14 Courses


Publications

Journal Articles


  • Training the trainers: teaching clinician educators to provide information literacy skills feedback JOURNAL OF THE MEDICAL LIBRARY ASSOCIATION Maggio, L. A., Posley, K. A. 2011; 99 (3): 258-261

    View details for DOI 10.3163/1536-5050.99.3.014

    View details for Web of Science ID 000293445700014

    View details for PubMedID 21753919

  • A 39-Year-Old Woman With Lupus, Myositis, and a Recalcitrant Vasculopathy ARTHRITIS CARE & RESEARCH Sokolove, J., Copland, A., Shirvani, S., Brown, J., Posley, K., Chung, L. 2010; 62 (9): 1351-1356

    View details for DOI 10.1002/acr.20236

    View details for Web of Science ID 000281913400022

    View details for PubMedID 20506174

  • Resident run journal club: A model based on the adult learning theory MEDICAL TEACHER Hartzell, J. D., Veerappan, G. R., Posley, K., Shumway, N. M., Durning, S. J. 2009; 31 (4): E156-E161

    Abstract

    Multiple formats of journal club exist but data is lacking regarding which model is most effective. Many residents are dissatisfied with their current format, which was the case at our institution.This article discusses a resident run model, residents' perceptions following its implementation, and recommendations for running a successful journal club. Practice points Journal club formats vary extensively without a clearly superior method. Defining goals is the first step to a successful journal club. Structured review instruments for articles enhance journal club. The presence of subspecialty staff may augment learning. Resident-run models of journal club can be successfully implemented.A resident run model of journal club was developed based on Adult Learning Theory. A 30-question survey was created to assess residents' attitudes and satisfaction with the new model.All respondents preferred the new model compared to the old model. Residents reported the new model increased their medical knowledge (88%) and they were able to apply the methods learned in journal club to actual patients (82%).A resident run model of journal club may be a viable option for those attempting to start or improve their current club.

    View details for DOI 10.1080/01421590802516723

    View details for Web of Science ID 000265635400006

    View details for PubMedID 19404887

  • REVERSIBLE DEFICIT IN HAPTIC DELAY TASKS FROM COOLING PREFRONTAL CORTEX CEREBRAL CORTEX SHINDY, W. W., POSLEY, K. A., Fuster, J. M. 1994; 4 (4): 443-450

    Abstract

    The main purpose of this study was to explore the role of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in skilled and sequential haptic performance. Monkeys were trained to perform a delayed matching-to-sample task that required the memorization of three-dimensional objects perceived either by palpation (haptically) or by sight. At the start of a trial the animal was allowed to touch or view an object, the sample; after a period of delay, during which the object remained out of touch and out of sight, the animal was presented with two side-by-side objects--one of them the sample--for either tactile or visual recognition, and the choice of the sample (correct match) was rewarded. Three variants of the task were used: (1) visual sample, haptic match; (2) haptic sample, visual match; and (3) haptic sample, haptic match. The temporary bilateral cooling of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex to 15 degrees C induced a reversible deficit in performance of all three tasks. Cooling to the same degree a portion of posterior parietal cortex of equivalent size did not significantly alter either performance or reaction time. These findings indicate that the functional integrity of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex is important for performance of sequential behavior dependent on haptic skill. Further, the results suggest that the role of this cortex in active memory, already well documented for spatially and nonspatially defined visual information, extends also to tactile information and associated motor acts.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1994NW98100008

    View details for PubMedID 7950314

  • CROSSMODAL SHORT-TERM-MEMORY OF HAPTIC AND VISUAL INFORMATION NEUROPSYCHOLOGIA DIMATTIA, B. V., POSLEY, K. A., Fuster, J. M. 1990; 28 (1): 17-33

    Abstract

    Rhesus monkeys were trained on a within-subjects design to assess whether they could perform concurrently visual-to-haptic (V-H) and haptic-to-visual (H-V) crossmodal delayed matching-to-sample (DMS). A parametric analysis was conducted of the effect of delay between presentation and re-presentation of the test discriminanda (three-dimensional geometric objects). The results indicate that (a) monkeys are capable of concurrent V-H and H-V crossmodal matching of objects by shape, size, and texture; (b) monkeys acquire faster and perform better crossmodal matching in the V-H direction than in the H-V direction; (c) as they learn to perform DMS with successive object pairs, monkeys transfer some--procedural--knowledge from the use of one pair to the use of the next; and (d) in the monkey, crossmodal short-term memory, as measured by DMS performance, has a temporal decline.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1990CN93800003

    View details for PubMedID 2314562

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