Publications

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  • A Unified Treatment Algorithm and Admission Order Set for Pediatric Acute Pancreatitis JOURNAL OF PEDIATRIC GASTROENTEROLOGY AND NUTRITION Sellers, Z. M., Dike, C., Zhang, K., Giefer, M. J., Uc, A., Abu-El-Haija, M. 2019; 68 (6): E109–E111
  • A Unified Treatment Algorithm and Admission Order Set for Pediatric Acute Pancreatitis. Journal of pediatric gastroenterology and nutrition Sellers, Z. M., Dike, C., Zhang, K., Giefer, M. J., Uc, A., Abu-El-Haija, M. 2019

    View details for PubMedID 30921257

  • Procalcitonin as a Predictive Marker for Bacteremia in Children With a Central Line and Fever. Hospital pediatrics Damman, J., Arias, P., Kerner, J., Zhang, K. Y., Dehghan, M., Krishnan, G., Nespor, C., Bensen, R., Park, K. T. 2019

    Abstract

    Unnecessary use of antibiotics is an increasing problem. In this study, we sought to determine the diagnostic accuracy of procalcitonin in predicting bacteremia in children with a central line and fever, and we sought to determine optimal cutoff values to maximize sensitivity and specificity. This is the largest study to date in which procalcitonin is examined as a predictive marker of bacteremia in pediatric patients with a central line and fever.We conducted a retrospective cohort study of children aged 0 to 23 years with a central line and fever of 38°C who had procalcitonin and blood cultures drawn before initiation of antibiotics and had no other identified bacterial infection. Patients were also prospectively monitored via a custom-built electronic medical record dashboard for eligibility.There were 523 patients and >2500 procalcitonin values reviewed for eligibility. Of these, 169 (47%) patients and 335 blood cultures with procalcitonin were included. There were 94 (28%) positive bacterial blood cultures and 241 (72%) negative bacterial blood cultures. In bacteremic cultures, the mean procalcitonin level was 9.96 ± 15.96 ng/mL, and the median procalcitonin level was 4.85 ng/mL (interquartile range 18.5). In nonbacteremic cultures, the mean procalcitonin level was 1.23 ± 10.37 ng/mL, and the median procalcitonin level was 0.3 ng/mL (interquartile range 0.7). A receiver operating characteristic analysis indicated a procalcitonin level of ≥0.6 ng/mL as the best cutoff point that produced a sensitivity of 85.6% and a specificity of 65.7% (area under the curve 0.85).Procalcitonin is a sensitive biomarker in predicting bacteremia in children with a central line and fever.

    View details for PubMedID 31097470

  • Nationwide Trends in Acute and Chronic Pancreatitis Among Privately Insured Children and Non-Elderly Adults in the United States, 2007-2014 GASTROENTEROLOGY Sellers, Z. M., MacIsaac, D., Yu, H., Dehghan, M., Zhang, K., Bensen, R., Wong, J. J., Kin, C., Park, K. T. 2018; 155 (2): 469-+
  • Nationwide Trends in Acute and Chronic Pancreatitis Among Privately Insured Children and Non-Elderly Adults in the United States, 2007-2014. Gastroenterology Sellers, Z. M., MacIsaac, D., Yu, H., Dehghan, M., Zhang, K. Y., Bensen, R., Wong, J. J., Kin, C., Park, K. T. 2018

    Abstract

    Epidemiologic analyses of acute and chronic pancreatitis (AP and CP) provide insight into causes and strategies for prevention, and affect allocation of resources to its study and treatment. We sought to determine current and accurate incidences of AP and CP, along with the prevalence of CP, in children and adults in the United States.We collected data from the Truven MarketScan Research Databases of commercial inpatient and outpatient insurance claims in the United States from 2007 through 2014 (patients 0-64 years old). We calculated the incidences of AP and CP, and prevalence of CP, based on International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) diagnosis codes. Children were defined as 18 years or younger and adults as 19 to 64 years old.The incidence of pediatric AP was stable from 2007 through 2014, remaining at 12.3/100,000 persons in 2014. Meanwhile the incidence for adult AP decreased from 123.7/100,000 persons in 2007 to 111.2/100,000 persons in 2014. The incidence of CP decreased over time in children (2.2/100,000 persons in 2007 to 1.9/100,000 persons in 2014) and adults (31.7/100,000 persons in 2007 to 24.7/100,000 persons in 2014). The prevalence of pediatric and adult CP was 5.8/100,000 persons and 91.9/100,000 persons, respectively in 2014. Incidences of AP and CP increased with age; we found little change in incidence during the first decade of life, but linear increases starting in the second decade.We performed a comprehensive epidemiologic analysis of privately insured non-elderly adults and children with AP and CP in the United States. Changes in gallstone formation, smoking, and alcohol consumption, along with advances in pancreatitis management, may be responsible for the stabilization and even decrease in the incidences of AP and CP.

    View details for PubMedID 29660323

  • Plasmapheresis for Hypertriglyceridemia-Induced Acute Pancreatitis in a Child A Case Report and Brief Review of the Literature PANCREAS Zhang, K., Cox, K. L., Sellers, Z. M. 2017; 46 (7): E58–E59

    View details for PubMedID 28697142