Bio

Bio


Dr. Eisen is a Clinical Assistant Professor and CA Licensed Clinical Psychologist working with the INSPIRE Clinic at Stanford. Her research and clinical interest center on therapeutic interventions that support recovery for individuals living with serious mental illness, in particular for individuals with psychosis. Dr. Eisen received her bachelor’s degree from Cornell University, and her PhD from the University of Connecticut, and completed postdoctoral training at Stanford University. Before coming to the INSPIRE Clinic, Dr. Eisen worked for over 10 years as a psychologist on the acute inpatient units at Stanford Health Care. Dr. Eisen is trained in CBT for psychosis (CBTp) and has worked with colleagues to train therapists, nursing and multidisciplinary staff, medical students, and residents to integrate CBTp informed, recovery-oriented approaches into their work with individuals with psychosis. She provides both individual and group-based cognitive behavioral therapy.

Clinical Focus


  • Psychology
  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Psychosis
  • Early Intervention for Psychosis

Academic Appointments


  • Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Professional Education


  • Fellowship: Stanford University Pain Management Fellowship (2006) CA
  • PhD Training: University of Connecticut - Dept of Psychology (2005) CT
  • Internship: Coler-Goldwater Specialy Hospital and Nursing Facility (2005) NY

Publications

All Publications


  • CBT for Psychosis: Process-Oriented Therapies and the Third Wave (Book Review) JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHIATRY Book Review Authored by: Eisen, K., Hardy, K. 2020; 59 (3): 446–48
  • Reading and Recovery Expectations: Implementing a Recovery-Oriented Bibliotherapy Program in an Acute Inpatient Psychiatric Setting PSYCHIATRIC REHABILITATION JOURNAL Eisen, K., Lawlor, C., Wu, C., Mason, D. 2018; 41 (3): 243–45

    Abstract

    This study examined the feasibility and acceptability of developing a recovery-oriented book club in an acute inpatient psychiatric setting, and the impact of participation on measures of hope and recovery orientation.Participants were recruited from an inpatient psychiatric hospital and assigned to control (N = 13) or experimental (N = 13) conditions. Participants completed the Herth Hope Index (HHI) and the Mental Health Confidence Scale (MHCS) at baseline and follow-up. Book club participants completed a satisfaction survey. ANOVA was performed to examine changes on HHI and MHCS.No significant differences were found between conditions on HHI or MHCS. On the satisfaction survey, most book club participants agreed "somewhat" or "strongly" that the intervention increased self-understanding (92.3%) and hope (61.6%).Book club groups may help individuals in inpatient psychiatric settings feel more hopeful. Future research may examine the adaptability of this intervention for outpatient settings. (PsycINFO Database Record

    View details for DOI 10.1037/prj0000307

    View details for Web of Science ID 000443083500009

    View details for PubMedID 29975083

  • Stress management in the workplace: A comparison of a computer-based and an in-person stress-management intervention COMPUTERS IN HUMAN BEHAVIOR Eisen, K. P., Allen, G. J., Bollash, M., Pescatello, L. S. 2008; 24 (2): 486-496
  • BUILDING AN EFFECTIVE COGNITIVE BEHAVIORAL THERAPY GROUP IN AN ACUTE INPATIENT PSYCHIATRIC SETTING Eisen, K., Kharrazi, N. SPRINGER. 2017: S433–S434
  • PROVIDING BRIEF EVIDENCE-BASED INTERVENTIONS IN HOSPITAL AND MEDICAL SETTINGS Eisen, K., Kharrazi, N., Hoover, V. SPRINGER. 2017: S433
  • PROVIDING MEANINGFUL & EFFECTIVE BRIEF INDIVIDUAL PSYCHOLOGICAL INTERVENTIONS IN AN ACUTE INPATIENT SETTING Kharrazi, N., Eisen, K. SPRINGER. 2017: S434–S435

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