Bio

Clinical Focus


  • Pediatrics
  • Pediatric Hospital Medicine

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Medical Director, Clinical Informatics, LPCH (2012 - Present)
  • Physician Lead for IT Education and Training, Information Services, LPCH (2011 - Present)
  • Associate Pediatric Clerkship Director, Stanford School of Medicine (2011 - 2012)
  • Chief Resident, Stanford/LPCH (2010 - 2011)

Professional Education


  • Board Certification: Pediatrics, American Board of Pediatrics (2010)
  • Medical Education:University of California Davis (2007) CA
  • Residency:Lucile Packard Children's Hospital (2010) CA

Research & Scholarship

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


Resident Wellness
- Funded by a grant from the Arnold P. Gold Foundation

Publications

Journal Articles


  • Burnout in pediatric residents over a 2-year period: a longitudinal study. Academic pediatrics Pantaleoni, J. L., Augustine, E. M., Sourkes, B. M., Bachrach, L. K. 2014; 14 (2): 167-172

    Abstract

    Burnout is a work-related syndrome characterized by emotional exhaustion (EE), depersonalization (DP), and lack of personal accomplishment (PA). We hypothesized that the transition into an environment of high physical, intellectual, and emotional demands of the medical profession would lead to an increase in the prevalence of burnout in pediatric residents, which would remain high throughout residency.The Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) was administered to pediatric residents at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital 6 times between February 2010 and February 2012. These times corresponded to the start of residency, mid-intern year, end-intern year, mid-junior year, end-junior year, and mid-senior year.Mean values of burnout components changed significantly between the start of residency and mid-intern year. EE increased from 15.8 to 24.5 (P < .001), DP increased from 4.5 to 9.2 (P < .001), and PA decreased from 40.2 to 38.3 (P = .04). Similarly, the prevalence of burnout increased from 17% to 46% (P = .012), or 2% to 24% (P = .002) using more restrictive criteria, between the start of residency and mid-intern year. Significant changes in mean scores or prevalence of burnout were not found between any other consecutive times throughout residency.This longitudinal study documented a significant increase in the components of burnout among pediatric residents between the start of residency and mid-intern year, which persisted through the PGY2 and PGY3 years. Further studies are warranted to identify correlates of resident burnout and to develop preventative strategies to reduce its occurrence.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.acap.2013.12.001

    View details for PubMedID 24602580

  • Medical education in the electronic medical record (EMR) era: benefits, challenges, and future directions. Academic medicine Tierney, M. J., Pageler, N. M., Kahana, M., Pantaleoni, J. L., Longhurst, C. A. 2013; 88 (6): 748-752

    Abstract

    In the last decade, electronic medical record (EMR) use in academic medical centers has increased. Although many have lauded the clinical and operational benefits of EMRs, few have considered the effect these systems have on medical education. The authors review what has been documented about the effect of EMR use on medical learners through the lens of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's six core competencies for medical education. They examine acknowledged benefits and educational risks to use of EMRs, consider factors that promote their successful use when implemented in academic environments, and identify areas of future research and optimization of EMRs' role in medical education.

    View details for DOI 10.1097/ACM.0b013e3182905ceb

    View details for PubMedID 23619078

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