Bio

Clinical Focus


  • Acupuncture
  • Pain and Symptom Management
  • Pediatrics
  • General Pediatrics
  • Palliative Care

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Palliative Care Committee, Lucile Packard Children's Hospital (1998 - Present)
  • Ethics Committee, Lucile Packard Children's Hospital (1999 - Present)
  • Co-Chair Sedation Committee, Lucile Packard Children's Hospital (2001 - 2004)
  • Sedation Committee, Lucile Packard Children's Hospital (2001 - Present)
  • Patient Safety Committee, Lucile Packard Children's Hospital (2000 - 2003)
  • Pain Management Committee, Lucile Packard Children's Hospital (2000 - Present)

Professional Education


  • Board Certification: Pediatrics, American Board of Pediatrics (1999)
  • Fellowship:Stanford University School of Medicine (2000) CA
  • Residency:Stanford University School of Medicine (1999) CA
  • Board Certification: Hospice and Palliative Medicine, American Board of Pediatrics (2008)
  • Board Certification, American Board of Pediatrics, Hospice and Palliative Medicine (2008)
  • DABMA, AAMA, Medical Acupuncture (2003)
  • MD, University of Minnesota, Medicine (1996)
  • Fellowship, Stanford University, Pediatric Pain Management (2000)
  • Residency, Stanford Hospital and Clinics, Pediatrics (1999)
  • Medical Education:University of Minnesota School of Medicine (1996) MN

Community and International Work


  • Exploring a Sense of Place, San Francisquito Creek Watershed

    Topic

    local bioregion, nature and self discovery

    Partnering Organization(s)

    Foundation for Global Community/Connextions

    Populations Served

    local citizens

    Location

    Bay Area

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    Yes

  • GirlVentures Risk Management Committee, San Francisco

    Topic

    girls self-esteem building organization, adventure experiences in the outdoors

    Populations Served

    middle/high school girls

    Location

    Bay Area

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    Yes

  • Papua New Guinea Medical Mission

    Topic

    health care/teaching

    Populations Served

    Sepik River People

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    Yes

Research & Scholarship

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


Julie's academic interests include pediatric palliative care, pain and symptom management for children with life-threatening illness, medical acupuncture, and meaning in medicine (the humanistic side of doctoring)

Teaching

2013-14 Courses


Graduate and Fellowship Programs


Publications

Journal Articles


  • Psychiatric medications for the treatment of pruritus PSYCHOSOMATIC MEDICINE Shaw, R. J., Dayal, S., Good, J., Bruckner, A. L., Joshi, S. V. 2007; 69 (9): 970-978

    Abstract

    To review the use of psychiatric medications in the treatment of pruritus.A literature review was conducted using the key words pruritus, psychiatric, and treatment.Three categories of pruritus are described: dermatologic, systemic, and psychogenic. Peripheral and central nervous system mechanisms of pruritus are reviewed. Conventional dermatologic treatments for pruritus are contrasted with some of the common psychopharmacologic treatment modalities that include anxiolytic, antidepressant, and antipsychotic agents. A treatment algorithm is offered to help guide the treatment of patients with pruritus.Psychiatric medications have been used successfully in the treatment of pruritus that is associated with both psychocutaneous and systemic disorders, which are resistant to conventional treatment.

    View details for DOI 10.1097/PSY.0b013e3181572799

    View details for Web of Science ID 000251204900024

    View details for PubMedID 17991825

  • Improved pain management in pediatric postoperative liver transplant patients using parental education and non-pharmacologic interventions PEDIATRIC TRANSPLANTATION Sharek, P. J., Wayman, K., Lin, E., Strichartz, D., Sentivany-Collins, S., Good, J., Esquivel, C., Brown, M., Cox, K. 2006; 10 (2): 172-177

    Abstract

    A pain management intervention, consisting of pretransplant parental education and support, pre- and postoperative behavioral pediatrics consultation, postoperative physical and occupational therapy consultation, and implementation of non-pharmacologic pain management strategies, was introduced to all pediatrics patients receiving liver transplants at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital beginning August 2001. Children receiving transplants pre-intervention (May, 2000 to February, 2001) and post-intervention (August, 2001 to March, 2002) were compared using pain scores, parent perception of pain ratings, length of stay, ventilator days, total cost, and opioid use. A total of 27 children were evaluated (13 historical control, 14 intervention). The two populations did not differ on age at transplant (mean age 53.8 vs. 63.6 months), sex (46.1% vs. 50% male), ethnicity (53.8% vs. 57.1% white, non-Hispanic) weight at transplant (17.5 vs. 24.7 kg), percent with biliary atresia as the primary reason for transplant (42.9% vs. 69.2%), percent with status 1 transplant listing score (38.5% vs. 50.0%), or public insurance status (30.8 vs. 57.2% with Medicaid). No differences were found in mean pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) postoperative length of stay (6.7 vs. 5.3 days), total postoperative length of stay (17.5 vs. 17.5 days), total inpatient length of stay (27.0 vs. 24.4 days), time to extubation (30 vs. 24.3 h), total cost (dollar 147,983 vs. dollar 157,882) or opioid use through postoperative day (POD) 6 (0.24 vs. 0.25 mg/kg/day morphine equivalent). A decrease in mean pain score between POD 0 and 6 (2.82 vs. 2.12; p = 0.047), a decrease in mean parental pain perception score (3.1 vs. 2.1; p = 0.001), and an increase in number of pain assessments per 12 h shift (3.43 vs. 6.79; p < 0.005) were seen. A comprehensive non-pharmacologic postoperative pain management program in children receiving a liver transplant was associated with decreased pain scores, improved parent perception of pain, and an increased number of pain assessments per 12 h shift. No increases in lengths of stay (PICU, postoperative, total), time to extubation, or total cost were found.

    View details for DOI 10.1111/j.1399-3046.2005.00438.x

    View details for Web of Science ID 000236026400011

    View details for PubMedID 16573603

  • Food, toys, and love: pediatric palliative care. Current problems in pediatric and adolescent health care Sourkes, B., Frankel, L., Brown, M., Contro, N., Benitz, W., Case, C., Good, J., Jones, L., Komejan, J., Modderman-Marshall, J., Reichard, W., Sentivany-Collins, S., Sunde, C. 2005; 35 (9): 350-386

    View details for PubMedID 16301200

Books and Book Chapters


  • The Stanford Arts and Anesthesia Soiree: Performing to create community and understand anesthesiology Creative Arts in Humane Medicine Ed. McLean CL Chen, C., Hasan, N., Good, J., Shafer, A. Brush Education Inc.. 2014: pp. 76-81

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