Bio

Clinical Focus


  • Internal Medicine

Academic Appointments


Honors & Awards


  • Philips CT NetForum Publication of the Year - Finalist, UCSF Neurocardiovascular Imaging Laboratory (2009)
  • Research Fellow, Doris Duke Clinical Foundation (2008-2009)
  • Summer Research Fellow, American Heart Association (2006)
  • Medical Education Excellence Award, American Medical Student Association (2006)
  • The Dean's Award for Academic Accomplishment, Stanford University (2005)
  • Member, Phi Beta Kappa (2005)
  • Summer Research Fellow, Howard Hughes Medical Institute (2004)
  • Donald Kennedy Public Service Fellow, Stanford Haas Center for Public Service (2003)
  • Outstanding Service Award, Department of Veterans Affairs Central Office (2003)

Professional Education


  • Medical Education:UCSF-School of Medicine (2010) CA
  • Residency:Stanford University Internal Medicine Program (2013) CA
  • MD, University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine, MD with Certificate in Biomedical Research (2010)
  • BS with Distinction, Stanford University, Major in Biological Sciences, Minor in Philosophy (2005)

Research & Scholarship

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


Clinical & Translational Research, Medical Informatics, Delivery of Cost-Conscious Care via Medical Education & EHR-based Clinical Decision Support Tools

Publications

Journal Articles


  • The electronic health record as a healthcare management strategy and implications for obstetrics and gynecologic practice. Current opinion in obstetrics & gynecology Eisenberg, M., Hom, J., Sharp, C. 2013; 25 (6): 476-481

    Abstract

    To review the current trends, utilities, impacts and strategy for electronic health records (EHRs) as related to obstetrics and gynecology.Adoption and utilization of EHRs are increasing rapidly but variably, given pressures of financial incentives, policy and technological advancement. Adoption is outpacing published evidence, but there is a growing body of descriptive literature regarding incentives, benefits, risks and costs of adoption and utilization. Further, there is a rising body of evidence that EHRs can bring benefits to processes and outcomes, and that their implementation can be considered as a healthcare management strategy. Obstetrics and gynecology practices have specific needs, which must be addressed in the adoption of such technology. Specialty specific literature is sparse but should be considered as part of any strategy aimed at achieving quality improvement and practice behavior change.Obstetrics and gynecologic practice presents unique challenges to the effective adoption and use of EHR technologies, but there is promise as the technologies, integration and usability are rapidly improving. This technology will have an increasing impact on the practice of obstetrics and gynecology in the coming years.

    View details for DOI 10.1097/GCO.0000000000000029

    View details for PubMedID 24185005

  • Multiparametric MRI and CT Models of Infarct Core and Favorable Penumbral Imaging Patterns in Acute Ischemic Stroke STROKE Kidwell, C. S., Wintermark, M., De Silva, D. A., Schaewe, T. J., Jahan, R., Starkman, S., Jovin, T., Hom, J., Jumaa, M., Schreier, J., Gornbein, J., Liebeskind, D. S., Alger, J. R., Saver, J. L. 2013; 44 (1): 73-79

    Abstract

    Objective imaging methods to identify optimal candidates for late recanalization therapies are needed. The study goals were (1) to develop magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) multiparametric, voxel-based predictive models of infarct core and penumbra in acute ischemic stroke patients, and (2) to develop patient-level imaging criteria for favorable penumbral pattern based on good clinical outcome in response to successful recanalization.An analysis of imaging and clinical data was performed on 2 cohorts of patients (one screened with CT, the other with MRI) who underwent successful treatment for large vessel, anterior circulation stroke. Subjects were divided 2:1 into derivation and validation cohorts. Pretreatment imaging parameters independently predicting final tissue infarct and final clinical outcome were identified.The MRI and CT models were developed and validated from 34 and 32 patients, using 943 320 and 1 236 917 voxels, respectively. The derivation MRI and 2-branch CT models had an overall accuracy of 74% and 80%, respectively, and were independently validated with an accuracy of 71% and 79%, respectively. The imaging criteria of (1) predicted infarct core ?90 mL and (2) ratio of predicted infarct tissue within the at-risk region ?70% identified patients as having a favorable penumbral pattern with 78% to 100% accuracy.Multiparametric voxel-based MRI and CT models were developed to predict the extent of infarct core and overall penumbral pattern status in patients with acute ischemic stroke who may be candidates for late recanalization therapies. These models provide an alternative approach to mismatch in predicting ultimate tissue fate.

    View details for DOI 10.1161/STROKEAHA.112.670034

    View details for Web of Science ID 000312883800014

    View details for PubMedID 23233383

  • MRI Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability Measurements to Predict Hemorrhagic Transformation in a Rat Model of Ischemic Stroke TRANSLATIONAL STROKE RESEARCH Hoffmann, A., Bredno, J., Wendland, M. F., Derugin, N., Hom, J., Schuster, T., Zimmer, C., Su, H., Ohara, P. T., Young, W. L., Wintermark, M. 2012; 3 (4): 508-516
  • Delay correction for the assessment of blood-brain barrier permeability using first-pass dynamic perfusion CT. AJNR. American journal of neuroradiology Schneider, T., Hom, J., Bredno, J., Dankbaar, J. W., Cheng, S., Wintermark, M. 2011; 32 (7): E134-8

    Abstract

    Hemorrhagic transformation is a serious potential complication of ischemic stroke with damage to the BBB as one of the contributing mechanisms. BBB permeability measurements extracted from PCT by using the Patlak model can provide a valuable assessment of the extent of BBB damage. Unfortunately, Patlak assumptions require extended PCT acquisition, increasing the risk of motion artifacts. A necessary correction is presented for obtaining accurate BBB permeability measurements from first-pass PCT.

    View details for DOI 10.3174/ajnr.A2152

    View details for PubMedID 20538824

  • Dynamic perfusion-CT assessment of early changes in blood brain barrier permeability of acute ischaemic stroke patients JOURNAL OF NEURORADIOLOGY Dankbaar, J. W., Hom, J., Schneider, T., Cheng, S., Bredno, J., LAU, B. C., van der Schaaf, I. C., Wintermark, M. 2011; 38 (3): 161-166

    Abstract

    Damage to the blood brain barrier (BBB) may lead to haemorrhagic transformation after ischaemic stroke. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of patient characteristics and stroke severity on admission BBB permeability (BBBP) values measured with perfusion-CT (PCT) in acute ischaemic stroke patients.We retrospectively identified 65 patients with proven ischaemic stroke admitted within 12 hours after symptom onset. Patients' charts were reviewed for demographic variables and vascular risk factors. The Patlak's model was applied to calculate BBBP values from the PCT data in the infarct core, penumbra and non-ischaemic tissue in the contralateral hemisphere. Mean BBBP values and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated in the different tissue types. Effects of demographic variables and risk factors on BBBP were analyzed using a multivariate, generalized estimating equations (GEE) model.BBBP values in the infarct core (mean [95%CI]: 2.48 [2.16-2.85]) and penumbra (2.48 [2.21-2.79]) were significantly higher than in non-ischaemic tissue (2.12 [1.88-2.39]). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that collateral filling has effect on BBBP. Less elevated BBBP values were associated with more than 50% collateral filling.BBBP values are increased in ischaemic brain tissue on the admission PCT scan of acute ischaemic stroke patients. Less abnormally elevated BBBP values were observed in patients with more than 50% collateral filling, possibly explaining why there is a relationship between more collateral filling and a lower incidence of haemorrhagic transformation.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.neurad.2010.08.001

    View details for Web of Science ID 000293209800005

    View details for PubMedID 20950860

  • Validation of In Vivo Magnetic Resonance Imaging Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability Measurements by Comparison With Gold Standard Histology STROKE Hoffmann, A., Bredno, J., Wendland, M. F., Derugin, N., Hom, J., Schuster, T., Su, H., Ohara, P. T., Young, W. L., Wintermark, M. 2011; 42 (7): 2054-2060

    Abstract

    We sought to validate the blood-brain barrier permeability measurements extracted from perfusion-weighted MRI through a relatively simple and frequently applied model, the Patlak model, by comparison with gold standard histology in a rat model of ischemic stroke.Eleven spontaneously hypertensive rats and 11 Wistar rats with unilateral 2-hour filament occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery underwent imaging during occlusion at 4 hours and 24 hours after reperfusion. Blood-brain barrier permeability was imaged by gradient echo imaging after the first pass of the contrast agent bolus and quantified by a Patlak analysis. Blood-brain barrier permeability was shown on histology by the extravasation of Evans blue on fluorescence microscopy sections matching location and orientation of MR images. Cresyl-violet staining was used to detect and characterize hemorrhage. Landmark-based elastic image registration allowed a region-by-region comparison of permeability imaging at 24 hours with Evans blue extravasation and hemorrhage as detected on histological slides obtained immediately after the 24-hour image set.Permeability values in the nonischemic tissue (marginal mean ± SE: 0.15 ± 0.019 mL/min 100 g) were significantly lower compared to all permeability values in regions of Evans blue extravasation or hemorrhage. Permeability values in regions of weak Evans blue extravasation (0.23 ± 0.016 mL/min 100 g) were significantly lower compared to permeability values of in regions of strong Evans blue extravasation (0.29 ± 0.020 mL/min 100 g) and macroscopic hemorrhage (0.35 ± 0.049 mL/min 100 g). Permeability values in regions of microscopic hemorrhage (0.26 ± 0.024 mL/min 100 g) only differed significantly from values in regions of nonischemic tissue (0.15 ± 0.019 mL/min 100 g).Areas of increased permeability measured in vivo by imaging coincide with blood-brain barrier disruption and hemorrhage observed on gold standard histology.

    View details for DOI 10.1161/STROKEAHA.110.597997

    View details for Web of Science ID 000292090900054

    View details for PubMedID 21636816

  • Stroke Imaging Research Road Map NEUROIMAGING CLINICS OF NORTH AMERICA Leiva-Salinas, C., Hom, J., Warach, S., Wintermark, M. 2011; 21 (2): 239-?

    Abstract

    Although acute stroke imaging has made significant progress in the last few years, several improvements and validation steps are needed to make stroke-imaging techniques fully operational and appropriate in daily clinical practice. This review outlines the needs in the stroke-imaging field and describes a consortium that was founded to provide them.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.nic.2011.01.009

    View details for Web of Science ID 000292007900005

    View details for PubMedID 21640297

  • Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability Assessed by Perfusion CT Predicts Symptomatic Hemorrhagic Transformation and Malignant Edema in Acute Ischemic Stroke AMERICAN JOURNAL OF NEURORADIOLOGY Hom, J., Dankbaar, J. W., Soares, B. P., Schneider, T., Cheng, S., Bredno, J., LAU, B. C., Smith, W., Dillon, W. P., Wintermark, M. 2011; 32 (1): 41-48

    Abstract

    SHT and ME are feared complications in patients with acute ischemic stroke. They occur >10 times more frequently in tPA-treated versus placebo-treated patients. Our goal was to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of admission BBBP measurements derived from PCT in predicting the development of SHT and ME in patients with acute ischemic stroke.We retrospectively analyzed a dataset consisting of 32 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke with appropriate admission and follow-up imaging. We calculated admission BBBP by using delayed-acquisition PCT data and the Patlak model. Collateral flow was assessed on the admission CTA, while recanalization and reperfusion were assessed on the follow-up CTA and PCT, respectively. SHT and ME were defined according to ECASS III criteria. Clinical data were obtained from chart review. In our univariate and forward selection-based multivariate analysis for predictors of SHT and ME, we incorporated both clinical and imaging variables, including age, admission NIHSS score, admission blood glucose level, admission blood pressure, time from symptom onset to scanning, treatment type, admission PCT-defined infarct volume, admission BBBP, collateral flow, recanalization, and reperfusion. Optimal sensitivity and specificity for SHT and ME prediction were calculated by using ROC analysis.In our sample of 32 patients, 3 developed SHT and 3 developed ME. Of the 3 patients with SHT, 2 received IV tPA, while 1 received IA tPA and treatment with the Merci device; of the 3 patients with ME, 2 received IV tPA, while 1 received IA tPA and treatment with the Merci device. Admission BBBP measurements above the threshold were 100% sensitive and 79% specific in predicting SHT and ME. Furthermore, all patients with SHT and ME--and only those with SHT and ME--had admission BBBP measurements above the threshold, were older than 65 years of age, and received tPA. Admission BBBP, age, and tPA were the independent predictors of SHT and ME in our forward selection-based multivariate analysis. Of these 3 variables, only BBBP measurements and age were known before making the decision of administering tPA and thus are clinically meaningful.Admission BBBP, a pretreatment measurement, was 100% sensitive and 79% specific in predicting SHT and ME.

    View details for DOI 10.3174/ajnr.A2244

    View details for Web of Science ID 000287016200008

    View details for PubMedID 20947643

  • Reperfusion Is a More Accurate Predictor of Follow-Up Infarct Volume Than Recanalization A Proof of Concept Using CT in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients STROKE Soares, B. P., Tong, E., Hom, J., Cheng, S., Bredno, J., Boussel, L., Smith, W. S., Wintermark, M. 2010; 41 (1): E34-E40

    Abstract

    The purpose of this study was to compare recanalization and reperfusion in terms of their predictive value for imaging outcomes (follow-up infarct volume, infarct growth, salvaged penumbra) and clinical outcome in acute ischemic stroke patients. Material andTwenty-two patients admitted within 6 hours of stroke onset were retrospectively included in this study. These patients underwent a first stroke CT protocol including CT-angiography (CTA) and perfusion-CT (PCT) on admission, and similar imaging after treatment, typically around 24 hours, to assess recanalization and reperfusion. Recanalization was assessed by comparing arterial patency on admission and posttreatment CTAs; reperfusion, by comparing the volumes of CBV, CBF, and MTT abnormality on admission and posttreatment PCTs. Collateral flow was graded on the admission CTA. Follow-up infarct volume was measured on the discharge noncontrast CT. The groups of patients with reperfusion, no reperfusion, recanalization, and no recanalization were compared in terms of imaging and clinical outcomes.Reperfusion (using an MTT reperfusion index >75%) was a more accurate predictor of follow-up infarct volume than recanalization. Collateral flow and recanalization were not accurate predictors of follow-up infarct volume. An interaction term was found between reperfusion and the volume of the admission penumbra >50 mL.Our study provides evidence that reperfusion is a more accurate predictor of follow-up infarct volume in acute ischemic stroke patients than recanalization. We recommend an MTT reperfusion index >75% to assess therapy efficacy in future acute ischemic stroke trials that use perfusion-CT.

    View details for DOI 10.1161/STROKEAHA.109.568766

    View details for Web of Science ID 000273093400042

    View details for PubMedID 19910542

  • Age- and anatomy-related values of blood-brain barrier permeability measured by perfusion-CT in non-stroke patients JOURNAL OF NEURORADIOLOGY Dankbaar, J. W., Hom, J., Schneider, T., Cheng, S., LAU, B. C., van der Schaaf, I., Virmani, S., Pohlman, S., Wintermark, M. 2009; 36 (4): 219-227

    Abstract

    The goal of this study was to determine blood-brain barrier permeability (BBBP) values extracted from perfusion-CT (PCT) using the Patlak model and possible variations related to age, gender, race, vascular risk factors and their treatment and anatomy in non-stroke patients.We retrospectively identified 96 non-stroke patients who underwent a PCT study using a prolonged acquisition time up to 3 minutes. Patients' charts were reviewed for demographic data, vascular risk factors and their treatment. The Patlak model was applied to calculate BBBP values in regions of interest drawn within the basal ganglia and the gray and white matter of the different cerebral lobes. Differences in BBBP values were analyzed using a multivariate analysis considering clinical variables and anatomy.Mean absolute BBBP values were 1.2 ml 100 g(-1) min(-1) and relative BBBP/CBF values were 3.5%. Statistical differences between gray and white matter were not clinically relevant. BBBP values were influenced by age, history of diabetes and/or hypertension and aspirin intake.This study reports ranges of BBBP values in non-stroke patients calculated from delayed phase PCT data using the Patlak model. These ranges will be useful to detect abnormal BBBP values when assessing patients with cerebral infarction for the risk of hemorrhagic transformation.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.neurad.2009.01.001

    View details for Web of Science ID 000271524500005

    View details for PubMedID 19251320

  • Optimal Duration of Acquisition for Dynamic Perfusion CT Assessment of Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability Using the Patlak Model AMERICAN JOURNAL OF NEURORADIOLOGY Hom, J., Dankbaar, J. W., Schneider, T., Cheng, S., Bredno, J., Wintermark, M. 2009; 30 (7): 1366-1370

    Abstract

    A previous study demonstrated the need to use delayed acquisition rather than first-pass data for accurate blood-brain barrier permeability surface product (BBBP) calculation from perfusion CT (PCT) according to the Patlak model, but the optimal duration of the delayed acquisition has not been established. Our goal was to determine the optimal duration of the delayed PCT acquisition to obtain accurate BBBP measurements while minimizing potential motion artifacts and radiation dose.We retrospectively identified 23 consecutive patients with acute ischemic anterior circulation stroke who underwent a PCT study with delayed acquisition. The Patlak model was applied for the full delayed acquisition (90-240 seconds) and also for truncated analysis windows (90-210, 90-180, 90-150, 90-120 seconds). Linear regression of Patlak plots was performed separately for the full and truncated analysis windows, and the slope of these regression lines was used to indicate BBBP. The full and truncated analysis windows were compared in terms of the resulting BBBP values and the quality of the Patlak fitting.BBBP values in the infarct and penumbra were similar for the full 90- to 240-second acquisition (95% confidence intervals for the infarct and penumbra: 1.62-2.47 and 1.75-2.41 mL x100 g(-1) x min(-1), respectively) and the 90- to 210-second analysis window (1.82-2.76 and 2.01-2.74 mL x 100 g(-1) x min(-1), respectively). BBBP values increased significantly with shorter acquisitions. The quality of the Patlak fit was excellent for the full 90- to 240-second and 90- to 210-second acquisitions, but it degraded with shorter acquisitions.The duration for the delayed PCT acquisition should be at least 210 seconds, because acquisitions shorter than 210 seconds lead to significantly overestimated BBBP values.

    View details for DOI 10.3174/ajnr.A1592

    View details for Web of Science ID 000269169600020

    View details for PubMedID 19369610

  • Dynamic Perfusion CT Assessment of the Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability: First Pass versus Delayed Acquisition AMERICAN JOURNAL OF NEURORADIOLOGY Dankbaar, J. W., Hom, J., Schneider, T., Cheng, S., LAU, B. C., van der Schaaf, I., Virmani, S., Pohlman, S., Dillon, W. P., Wintermark, M. 2008; 29 (9): 1671-1676

    Abstract

    The Patlak model has been applied to first-pass perfusion CT (PCT) data to extract information on blood-brain barrier permeability (BBBP) to predict hemorrhagic transformation in patients with acute stroke. However, the Patlak model was originally described for the delayed steady-state phase of contrast circulation. The goal of this study was to assess whether the first pass or the delayed phase of a contrast bolus injection better respects the assumptions of the Patlak model for the assessment of BBBP in patients with acute stroke by using PCT.We retrospectively identified 125 consecutive patients (29 with acute hemispheric stroke and 96 without) who underwent a PCT study by using a prolonged acquisition time up to 3 minutes. The Patlak model was applied to calculate BBBP in ischemic and nonischemic brain tissue. Linear regression of the Patlak plot was performed separately for the first pass and for the delayed phase of the contrast bolus injection. Patlak linear regression models for the first pass and the delayed phase were compared in terms of their respective square root mean squared errors (square root MSE) and correlation coefficients (R) by using generalized estimating equations with robust variance estimation.BBBP values calculated from the first pass were significantly higher than those from the delayed phase, both in nonischemic brain tissue (2.81 mL x 100 g(-1) x min(-1) for the first pass versus 1.05 mL x 100 g(-1) x min(-1) for the delayed phase, P < .001) and in ischemic tissue (7.63 mL x 100 g(-1) x min(-1) for the first pass versus 1.31 mL x 100 g(-1) x min(-1) for the delayed phase, P < .001). Compared with regression models from the first pass, Patlak regression models obtained from the delayed data were of better quality, showing significantly lower square root MSE and higher R.Only the delayed phase of PCT acquisition respects the assumptions of linearity of the Patlak model in patients with and without stroke.

    View details for DOI 10.3174/ajnr.A1203

    View details for Web of Science ID 000260023800015

    View details for PubMedID 18635616

  • Accuracy and Anatomical Coverage of Perfusion CT Assessment of the Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability: One Bolus versus Two Boluses CEREBROVASCULAR DISEASES Dankbaar, J. W., Hom, J., Schneider, T., Cheng, S., Lau, B. C., van der Schaaf, I., Virmani, S., Pohlman, S., Dillon, W. P., Wintermark, M. 2008; 26 (6): 600-605

    Abstract

    To assess whether blood-brain barrier permeability (BBBP) values, extracted with the Patlak model from the second perfusion CT (PCT) contrast bolus, are significantly lower than the values extracted from the first bolus in the same patient.125 consecutive patients (29 with acute hemispheric stroke and 96 without stroke) who underwent a PCT study using a prolonged acquisition time up to 3 min were retrospectively identified. The Patlak model was applied to calculate the rate of contrast leakage out of the vascular compartment. Patlak plots were created from the arterial and parenchymal time enhancement curves obtained in multiple regions of interest drawn in ischemic brain tissue and in nonischemic brain tissue. The slope of a regression line fit to the Patlak plot was used as an indicator of BBBP. Square roots of the mean squared errors and correlation coefficients were used to describe the quality of the linear regression model. This was performed separately for the first and the second PCT bolus. Results from the first and the second bolus were compared in terms of BBBP values and the quality of the linear model fitted to the Patlak plot, using generalized estimating equations with robust variance estimation.BBBP values from the second bolus were not lower than BBBP values from the first bolus in either nonischemic brain tissue [estimated mean with 95% confidence interval: 1.42 (1.10-1.82) ml x 100 g(-1) x min(-1) for the first bolus versus 1.64 (1.31-2.05) ml x 100 g(-1) x min(-1) for the second bolus, p = 1.00] or in ischemic tissue [1.04 (0.97-1.12) ml x 100 g(-1) x min(-1) for the first bolus versus 1.19 (1.11-1.28) ml x 100 g(-1)min(-1) for the second bolus, p = 0.79]. Compared to regression models from the first bolus, the Patlak regression models obtained from the second bolus were of similar or slightly better quality. This was true both in nonischemic and ischemic brain tissue.The contrast material from the first bolus of contrast for PCT does not negatively influence measurements of BBBP values from the second bolus. The second bolus can thus be used to increase anatomical coverage of BBBP assessment using PCT.

    View details for DOI 10.1159/000165113

    View details for Web of Science ID 000261132400005

    View details for PubMedID 18946215

  • Quantitative Assessment of the Impact of the Service-Learning Course “Mental Health and the Veteran Population: Case Study and Practicum” on Undergraduate Students. Stanford Undergraduate Research Journal Hom J., Bahl M. 2006; 5: 24-30

Books and Book Chapters


  • Leakage Effects. MR and CT Perfusion and Pharmacokinetic Imaging Donahue, K., Hom, J., Boxerman, J., Bammer, R. Lippincott. 2014
  • Hemorrhage MR and CT Perfusion and Pharmacokinetic Imaging Wijman, C., Kassner, A., Hom, J. Lippincott. 2014
  • Service-Learning Courses at Stanford: How to Make a Good Thing Even Better. Public Service Education at Stanford: The Haas Center's First Twenty Years Hom, J. Stanford University Press. 2005

Presentations


  • Addressing Chronic Hepatitis B in the Asian Pacific Islander Community: A student-designed, community-based, multi-disciplinary preclinical curriculum.

    Ng S, Ding Y, Hom J, Liao C, Yu A.

    Presented To

    2006 American Medical Student Association Meeting

    Location

    Chicago

  • Dynamic Perfusion-CT Assessment of Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability in Acute Stroke Patients

    Hom J, Dillon WP, Smith W, Chen J, Virmani S, Pohlman S, Wintermark M.

    Presented To

    American Society of Neuroradiology

    Location

    New Orleans

  • Dynamic Perfusion-CT Assessment of Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability Distinguishes Between Infarct and Penumbra in Acute Stroke Patients.

    Hom J, Elijovich L, Smith W, Chen J, Virmani S, Pohlman S, Dillon WP, Wintermark M.

    Presented To

    American Heart Association International Stroke Conference

    Location

    San Francisco

  • Optimal Duration of Acquisition for Dynamic Perfusion-CT Assessment of Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability Using the Patlak Model.

    Hom J, Dankbaar JW, Soares BP, Schneider T, Cheng SC, Bredno J, Wintermark M.

    Presented To

    Bay Area Clinical Research Symposium

    Location

    San Francisco

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