Bio

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  • Feasibility of a massive online open course to teach skills in primary palliative care for a global audience. Kerkar, A., DeNofrio, J., Tribett, E., Ramchandran, K. AMER SOC CLINICAL ONCOLOGY. 2018
  • Rapid, Precise, and Accurate Counts of Symbiodinium Cells Using the Guava Flow Cytometer, and a Comparison to Other Methods. PloS one Krediet, C. J., DeNofrio, J. C., Caruso, C., Burriesci, M. S., Cella, K., Pringle, J. R. 2015; 10 (8)

    Abstract

    In studies of both the establishment and breakdown of cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis, it is often necessary to determine the number of Symbiodinium cells relative to the quantity of host tissue. Ideally, the methods used should be rapid, precise, and accurate. In this study, we systematically evaluated methods for sample preparation and storage and the counting of algal cells using the hemocytometer, a custom image-analysis program for automated counting of the fluorescent algal cells, the Coulter Counter, or the Millipore Guava flow-cytometer. We found that although other methods may have value in particular applications, for most purposes, the Guava flow cytometer provided by far the best combination of precision, accuracy, and efficient use of investigator time (due to the instrument's automated sample handling), while also allowing counts of algal numbers over a wide range and in small volumes of tissue homogenate. We also found that either of two assays of total homogenate protein provided a precise and seemingly accurate basis for normalization of algal counts to the total amount of holobiont tissue.

    View details for DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0135725

    View details for PubMedID 26291447

  • Coral bleaching independent of photosynthetic activity. Current biology Tolleter, D., Seneca, F. O., DeNofrio, J. C., Krediet, C. J., Palumbi, S. R., Pringle, J. R., Grossman, A. R. 2013; 23 (18): 1782-1786

    Abstract

    The global decline of reef-building corals is due in part to the loss of algal symbionts, or "bleaching," during the increasingly frequent periods of high seawater temperatures [1, 2]. During bleaching, endosymbiotic dinoflagellate algae (Symbiodinium spp.) either are lost from the animal tissue or lose their photosynthetic pigments, resulting in host mortality if the Symbiodinium populations fail to recover [3]. The >1,000 studies of the causes of heat-induced bleaching have focused overwhelmingly on the consequences of damage to algal photosynthetic processes [4-6], and the prevailing model for bleaching invokes a light-dependent generation of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) by heat-damaged chloroplasts as the primary trigger [6-8]. However, the precise mechanisms of bleaching remain unknown, and there is evidence for involvement of multiple cellular processes [9, 10]. In this study, we asked the simple question of whether bleaching can be triggered by heat in the dark, in the absence of photosynthetically derived ROS. We used both the sea anemone model system Aiptasia [11, 12] and several species of reef-building corals to demonstrate that symbiont loss can occur rapidly during heat stress in complete darkness. Furthermore, we observed damage to the photosynthetic apparatus under these conditions in both Aiptasia endosymbionts and cultured Symbiodinium. These results do not directly contradict the view that light-stimulated ROS production is important in bleaching, but they do show that there must be another pathway leading to bleaching. Elucidation of this pathway should help to clarify bleaching mechanisms under the more usual conditions of heat stress in the light.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.cub.2013.07.041

    View details for PubMedID 24012312

  • Isolation of clonal axenic strains of the symbiotic dinoflagellate Symbiodinium and their growth and host specificity JOURNAL OF PHYCOLOGY Xiang, T., Hambleton, E. A., DeNofrio, J. C., Pringle, J. R., Grossman, A. R. 2013; 49 (3): 447-458

    Abstract

    The cnidarian-dinoflagellate mutualism is integral to the survival of the coral-reef ecosystem. Despite the enormous ecological and economic importance of corals, their cellular and molecular biology and the ways in which they respond to environmental change are still poorly understood. We have been developing a proxy system for examining the coral mutualism in which the dinoflagellate symbiont Symbiodinium is introduced into a clonal population of the host Aiptasia, a small sea anemone closely related to corals. To further develop the tools for this system, we generated five clonal, axenic strains of Symbiodinium and verified the lack of contaminants by growth on rich medium, microscopic examination, and PCR analysis. These strains were assigned to clades A (two strains), B, E, and F based on their chloroplast 23S rDNA sequences. Growth studies in liquid cultures showed that the clade B strain and one of the clade A strains were able to grow photoautotrophically (in light with no fixed carbon), mixotrophically (in light with fixed carbon), or heterotrophically (in dark with fixed carbon). The clade E strain, thought to be free-living, was able to grow photoautotrophically but not heterotrophically. Infection of an aposymbiotic Aiptasia host with the axenic strains showed consistent patterns of specificity, with only the clade B and one of the clade A strains able to successfully establish symbiosis. Overall, the Aiptasia-Symbiodinium association represents an important model system for dissecting aspects of the physiology and cellular and molecular biology of cnidarian-dinoflagellate mutualism and exploring issues that bear directly on coral bleaching.

    View details for DOI 10.1111/jpy.12055

    View details for Web of Science ID 000319874900003

  • Isolation of clonal axenic strains of the symbiotic dinoflagellate Symbiodinium and their growth and host specificity(1). Journal of phycology Xiang, T., Hambleton, E. A., DeNofrio, J. C., Pringle, J. R., Grossman, A. R. 2013; 49 (3): 447–58

    Abstract

    The cnidarian-dinoflagellate mutualism is integral to the survival of the coral-reef ecosystem. Despite the enormous ecological and economic importance of corals, their cellular and molecular biology and the ways in which they respond to environmental change are still poorly understood. We have been developing a proxy system for examining the coral mutualism in which the dinoflagellate symbiont Symbiodinium is introduced into a clonal population of the host Aiptasia, a small sea anemone closely related to corals. To further develop the tools for this system, we generated five clonal, axenic strains of Symbiodinium and verified the lack of contaminants by growth on rich medium, microscopic examination, and PCR analysis. These strains were assigned to clades A (two strains), B, E, and F based on their chloroplast 23S rDNA sequences. Growth studies in liquid cultures showed that the clade B strain and one of the clade A strains were able to grow photoautotrophically (in light with no fixed carbon), mixotrophically (in light with fixed carbon), or heterotrophically (in dark with fixed carbon). The clade E strain, thought to be free-living, was able to grow photoautotrophically but not heterotrophically. Infection of an aposymbiotic Aiptasia host with the axenic strains showed consistent patterns of specificity, with only the clade B and one of the clade A strains able to successfully establish symbiosis. Overall, the Aiptasia-Symbiodinium association represents an important model system for dissecting aspects of the physiology and cellular and molecular biology of cnidarian-dinoflagellate mutualism and exploring issues that bear directly on coral bleaching.

    View details for PubMedID 27007034