Bio

Clinical Focus


  • Adolescent Medicine
  • Pediatrics
  • Student Affairs / Higher Education
  • Ambulatory Health Care Administration
  • College Health

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Director, Vaden Health Center (1994 - Present)
  • Associate Vice Provost, Division of Student Affairs (2007 - Present)

Professional Education


  • Board Certification: Pediatrics, American Board of Pediatrics (1977)
  • Fellowship:Stanford University School of Medicine (1980) CA
  • Fellowship:San Francisco General Hospital (1975) CA
  • Residency:Children's Hospital Oakland (1974) CA
  • Internship:Children's Hospital of Oakland (1973) CA
  • Medical Education:Albert Einstein College of Medicine (1972) NY

Teaching

2013-14 Courses


Publications

Journal Articles


  • THE INCIDENCE OF CHLAMYDIA-PNEUMONIAE LOWER RESPIRATORY-TRACT INFECTIONS AMONG UNIVERSITY-STUDENTS IN NORTHERN CALIFORNIA WESTERN JOURNAL OF MEDICINE Katzman, D. K., Tipton, A. C., Litt, I. F., Friedman, I. M., EMMONS, R. W., SCHACHTER, J. 1991; 155 (2): 136-139

    Abstract

    Chlamydia pneumoniae has recently been identified as a cause of lower respiratory tract infections. From March 1987 to March 1988, 259 university students-151 students with lower respiratory tract infections and 108 controls-from the University of California, Berkeley, were studied to determine the incidence and pattern of C pneumoniae lower respiratory tract infections. Serologic evidence of a recent C pneumoniae infection was found in less than 2%, and the organism was not isolated from any of the subjects. Despite the paucity of evidence of a recent infection, 47.5% of this university population showed serologic evidence of a previous C pneumoniae infection. The lower incidence of C pneumoniae infection in our population, when compared with previous reports, suggests that there may be geographic and temporal differences or fluctuations among populations.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1991GA96400002

    View details for PubMedID 1926842

  • CHLAMYDIA-TRACHOMATIS FITZ-HUGH-CURTIS SYNDROME WITHOUT SALPINGITIS IN FEMALE ADOLESCENTS AMERICAN JOURNAL OF DISEASES OF CHILDREN Katzman, D. K., Friedman, I. M., McDonald, C. A., Litt, I. F. 1988; 142 (9): 996-998

    Abstract

    We encountered seven female adolescents with the Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome and no signs or symptoms of salpingitis. Six of the patients had cervical cultures positive for Chlamydia trachomatis. The Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome should be included in the differential diagnosis of right-sided abdominal pain in the sexually active female adolescent to avoid unnecessary diagnostic procedures and to reduce the prevalence of chlamydial infection and its complications.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1988P928200031

    View details for PubMedID 3414633

  • ELEVATED SERUM IRON CONCENTRATION IN ADOLESCENT ALCOHOL USERS AMERICAN JOURNAL OF DISEASES OF CHILDREN Friedman, I. M., Kraemer, H. C., Mendoza, F. S., Hammer, L. D. 1988; 142 (2): 156-159

    Abstract

    Alcohol is a frequently abused drug among adolescents. In adults, alcohol alters iron metabolism, predisposing to excess hepatic iron storage and, possibly, liver damage. The purpose of this study was to determine whether alcohol is associated with an elevated serum iron concentration and transferrin saturation in adolescents, and to determine the contribution of oral contraceptive use to these abnormalities. Adolescents (591 male and 614 female) aged 16 to 19 years, who participated in the first National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 1971 to 1973, were grouped according to their reported frequency of alcohol intake. Drinking frequency was associated with serum iron concentrations in boys and girls, and with total iron-binding capacity, transferrin saturation, and hemoglobin concentration in boys. Alcohol use was associated with an elevated serum iron concentration only in oral contraceptive nonusers. Adolescents who use alcohol have an elevated serum iron concentration, and male alcohol users have an increased transferrin saturation as well. These abnormalities may be precursors of hepatic iron overload and chronic liver damage.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1988L894300024

    View details for PubMedID 3341315

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