School of Medicine


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  • Uri Ladabaum

    Uri Ladabaum

    Professor of Medicine (Gastroenterology and Hepatology) at the Stanford University School of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Gastrointestinal cancer prevention and risk management. Risk stratification. Cost-effectiveness analysis. Health services research.

  • Amy Ladd, MD

    Amy Ladd, MD

    Elsbach-Richards Professor of Surgery and Professor, by courtesy, of Medicine (Immunology & Rheumatology) and of Surgery (Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Research Interests
    1. The kinematics and forces associated with thumb carpometcarpal (CMC) function and pathology
    2. The anatomy, microstructure, and immunofluorescent characteristics of the thumb CMC joint
    3. Pathomechaniics of CMC arthritis: biomechanical wear, injury, genetic, and environmental causes
    4. Archiving, vitalizing, and innovating medical and surgical knowledge, most recently with innovative iBook monographs

  • Richard Lafayette

    Richard Lafayette

    Professor of Medicine (Nephrology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We are continuing to grow a glomerulonephritis cohort study, including immunologic characterization. We have completed interventional studies of preeclampsia exploring the nitric oxide, endothelin system and effects on glomerular function and morphometry. We continue to recruit patients for treatment and observational studies of glomerular disease, including FSGS, membranous and particularly IgA nephropathy. We also are actively studying renal disease in systemic amyloidosis.

  • Rayhan Lal

    Rayhan Lal

    Instructor, Pediatrics - Endocrinology and Diabetes

    Bio I grew up in the east bay area and have had type 1 diabetes for 30+ years. I studied electrical engineering and computer science at U.C. Berkeley (Go Bears!) with the hope of applying my knowledge to diabetes technology. The significance of clinical practice became clear to me after my siblings also developed diabetes. I am devoting my life to advancing the care of diabetes in people of all ages.

  • Vinh Lam

    Vinh Lam

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Bio Dr. Vinh Lam is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Medicine, Division of Primary Care and Population health. He earned his MD from the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and chose to stay in Los Angeles to complete his family medicine residency training at UCLA. During his training, Dr. Lam developed a strong interest in teaching and medical education through his involvement with resident education and the graduate medical education committee. He also spent 1 year as a resident informaticist where he also became very interested in informatics, medical technology, and innovative solutions to improving patient health outcomes and decreasing physician burnout. Dr. Lam enjoys caring for patients of all ages from pediatrics to geriatrics, performing office-based procedures, and prioritizing preventative care.
    Outside of medicine, Dr. Lam loves to travel with his family, dabbles in photography and videography, and enjoys attempting to recreate meals he has had while traveling with his wife, Becca.

  • Curtis Langlotz

    Curtis Langlotz

    Professor of Radiology (Thoracic Imaging) and of Biomedical Informatics Research at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am interested in the use of deep neural networks and other machine learning technologies to help radiologists detect disease and eliminate diagnostic errors. My laboratory is developing deep neural networks that detect and classify disease on medical images. We also develop natural language processing methods that use the narrative radiology report to create large annotated image training sets for supervised machine learning experiments.

  • Benjamin Laniakea

    Benjamin Laniakea

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Bio Dr. Benjamin Laniakea is a board-certified family medicine physician specializing in full-spectrum LGBTQ+ health. He graduated from the SUNY at Buffalo School of Medicine and Biomedical sciences and attended residency at UCSF Fresno Family and Community Medicine residency program. Since 2018 he has been the Theme Lead for the Sex, Gender, and Sexual Function curriculum at the Stanford School of Medicine and spearheads the new Stanford LGBTQ+ program.

  • Samuel LeBaron

    Samuel LeBaron

    Professor of Medicine (Family and Community Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Physician-patient communication; cross cultural dimensions of health care; strategies for health maintenance and promotion; integrative medicine.

  • David Lee, MD

    David Lee, MD

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests 1. Novel treatments and devices for the treatment of valvular disease
    2. Alcohol septal ablation for hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy
    3. Novel approaches to coronary revascularization
    4. Closure devices for atrial septal defects and patent foramen ovale
    5. Novel treatments for hypertension

  • Jennifer Lee

    Jennifer Lee

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology) and, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am a clinical scientist (PhD epidemiology), endocrinologist, and CMO at VAPA Cooperative Studies Program Coordinating Center . My group does pattern and prediction mapping along the life-course of interventions/outcomes and how healthcare system can positively impact health longitudinally. We use novel molecular epi, 'big' data like EHRs with advanced new designs/methods/technologies. These interests cut across multiple complex chronic diseases, aging, & critical lifespan stages.

  • Mary Leonard

    Mary Leonard

    Arline and Pete Harman Professor and Professor of Medicine (Nephrology) and, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My multidisciplinary research program is focused on (1) the detrimental effects of glucocorticoids, sarcopenia and inflammation on bone development in pediatric diseases, (2) the long-term effects of childhood cancer on bone and muscle quality, (3) the assessment of renal osteodystrophy using novel micro-imaging techniques, (4) the effects of vitamin D deficiency on physical function and cardiovascular disease, and (5) the evaluation of biomechanical interventions as anabolic bone therapies.

  • John Leppert

    John Leppert

    Associate Professor of Urology and, by courtesy, of Medicine (Nephrology) at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research aims to improve the global quality of care for patients with Urologic Cancer with a particular focus on kidney cancer. We are investigating novel proteomic platforms and assays to diagnose kidney cancer and predict response to therapy. We are evaluating the comparative effectiveness of various kidney cancer surgeries and their impact on chronic kidney disease and its downstream effects. We are applying epidemiology, bioinformatics, and health services methods to urologic conditions.

  • Lawrence Leung

    Lawrence Leung

    Maureen Lyles D'Ambrogio Professor in the School of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our long term interest is to have a better understanding of the natural antithrombotic pathways and the pathophysiology of vascular thrombosis. We have focused on thrombin, the key enzyme in the blood clotting cascade.Our goal is to develop new antithrombotic agents and devise new diagnostic tests for vascular thrombotic disorders.

  • Eleanor Levin

    Eleanor Levin

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Bio Eleanor Levin completed her undergraduate degree at Stanford, Phi Beta Kappa in Human Biology with Distinction, and her MD at UCSF as a Phi Beta Kappa Scholar. Her first internship was at Children's Hospital of San Francisco in pediatrics and her second at the Cleveland Clinic in internal medicine. She completed internal medicine training at Georgetown University and cardiology fellowship at George Washington University in Washington, D.C. At GW she undertook an advanced fellowship in echocardiography and lipids following her general cardiology fellowship. After fellowship training, Dr. Levin joined the GW faculty as an assistant professor of medicine in the Lipid Research Clinic. Subsequently she joined The Permanente Medical Group in northern California as a non-invasive cardiologist. She directed the Echocardiography Lab at Kaiser Santa Clara and introduced TEE and stress echo during her 25-year tenure. She introduced CT angiography of the heart at Santa Clara and coordinated joint readings between Radiology and Cardiology for 15 years. She created the Cholesterol Management and Heart Failure Programs initially at Santa Clara and eventually at more than 20 medical centers in Northern California. She was Kaiser's regional expert in lipidology as well as in cardiac disease in pregnancy in a patient population of 4 million. Dr. Levin served as Chief of Cardiology at Santa Clara for 16 years and as Chair of the Chiefs of Cardiology (120 cardiologists) for Northern California Kaiser for 8 years. She directed the Regional Cardiac Rehabilitation Program using home-based comprehensive rehabilitation across 18 medical centers for nearly three decades. During this time, she led teams developing cardiac guidelines embedded in order sets and electronic medical records throughout Kaiser medical centers to improve quality. She has spoken about and presented her work on population management and quality improvement nationally and internationally. Her awards include the national NCQA (National Committee of Quality Assurance) Award for Excellence in Cardiac Care, the Exceptional Contribution Award from The Permanente Medical Group for ?exceptional work in care management programs? for heart failure and cholesterol management, the Santa Clara County Medical Association Outstanding Achievement Award for cardiac care management, and the Silicon Business Journal Award as one of the "Top 100 Influential Women in Silicon Valley." She is a fellow of the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association. She is board certified in both Internal Medicine and in Cardiovascular Diseases by the American Board of Internal Medicine.
    Dr. Levin is a member of the Preventive Cardiology group. She consults on pregnant patients with heart disease as well as general cardiology patients with lipid disorders and a broad range of cardiovascular diseases.

  • Joseph Levitt, MD, MS

    Joseph Levitt, MD, MS

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research focuses on the physiolgogic and biomarker characteristics of early acute lung injury (ALI) prior to need for mechanical ventilation. While, to date no pharmacologic treatment has improved survival in ALI, following the paradigm of early goal directed therapy for severe sepsis, clinical benefit may derive from identifying patients and initiating treatment prior to the need for positive pressure ventilation (and therefore prior to meeting current study entry criteria).

  • Lee Levitt

    Lee Levitt

    Professor of Medicine (Hematology) at the Santa Clara Valley Medical Center, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Low molecular-weight heparins Clinical trials with anti-thrombotics Clinical trials in patients with leukemia, breast cancer and myeloma Medical education.

  • Ronald Levy, MD

    Ronald Levy, MD

    Robert K. and Helen K. Summy Professor in the School of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Clinical Interests: lymphoma. Research Interests: Immunology and molecular biology of lymphoid malignancy; molecular vaccines for cancer.

  • Shoshana Levy

    Shoshana Levy

    Professor (Research) of Medicine (Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research focuses on the mechanism of action of tetraspanins, an evolutionary conserved, widely expressed multi-gene family. We study a prototype, CD81, a molecule implicated in the pathogenesis of two major human diseases: hepatitis C virus (HCV) and malaria.

  • Eldrin F. Lewis, MD, MPH

    Eldrin F. Lewis, MD, MPH

    Simon H Stertzer, M.D. Professor

    Bio Dr. Lewis is a board-certified, fellowship-trained specialist in cardiovascular medicine. He is the chief of the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine and a professor of cardiovascular medicine.

    Dr. Lewis is an esteemed clinician-scientist who specializes in the care of patients with advanced heart failure. He is an internationally recognized expert on heart failure, heart transplant, and quality of life for heart failure patients. He cares deeply about his patients as well as his colleagues, the hospital, and the School of Medicine. Dr. Lewis is committed to diversity and inclusion, as well as expanding Stanford clinical research initiatives.

    A fundamental principle of Dr. Lewis? practice is his belief that ?there is more to life than death,? that cardiovascular care should go beyond helping patients survive to also helping them enjoy the best possible quality of life.

    Dr. Lewis has deep expertise in conducting clinical trials examining diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to heart failure. He has done innovative work to create systems for incorporating quality of life measures for cardiovascular patients into electronic health records. This research has received support from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute and the National Institutes of Health.

    Much of his quality of life research has focused on patient-reported outcomes. Dr. Lewis emphasizes the importance of looking at how a disease, whether chronic or acute, impacts people?s ability to function and perform their activities of daily living. Strategies to improve patients? well-being focus not only on their physical symptoms but also on depression, anxiety, exercise capacity, and ability to function in daily living.

    Dr. Lewis? commitment to expanding clinical research initiatives will give patients more opportunities to participate in the clinical trials and access the latest care strategies that can translate into better outcomes. The goal is early access to the most advanced technology, pharmacology, and device therapy that can change outcomes for the better. He also envisions forming closer partnerships with community cardiologists and capitalizing further on Stanford?s proximity to and unique relationships with the digital technology leaders of Silicon Valley to enhance the use of digital technology for monitoring patients, optimizing treatment, and tracking outcomes.

    He has authored nearly 200 articles published in peer-reviewed journals including the New England Journal of Medicine, Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Circulation, JAMA Cardiology, JAMA Internal Medicine, and many more. He is also on multiple editorial boards for cardiovascular journals and was an associate editor for Circulation?Heart Failure. In addition, he is an author of professional society clinical practice guidelines and scientific statements from both the American Heart Association (AHA) and the Food and Drug Administration.

    Dr. Lewis? honors for clinical care, scholarship, and research include the Joel Gordon Miller Award for community service and leadership from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. He also was one of the first recipients of the Minority Faculty Development Award, which recognizes the research potential of young physicians. Dr. Lewis has received a grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to study the role of quality of life assessment in clinical decision making in patients with heart failure.

    He is a fellow of the American College of Cardiology and the National American Heart Association (AHA) Research Committee. In addition, Dr. Lewis was as a member of the AHA Founders Affiliate Board of Directors, chair of the Council on Clinical Cardiology, and research chair of the Association of Black Cardiologists. He also serves on scientific committees to review grants for the AHA and on the FDA Task Force for the Standardization of Definitions for Endpoint Events in Cardiovascular Trials.

  • Ron Li

    Ron Li

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine

    Bio Ron Li is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Division of Hospital Medicine and Center for Biomedical Informatics Research at Stanford University School of Medicine. His academic interests focus on the "delivery science" of artificial intelligence in healthcare and how to design, implement, and evaluate AI enabled systems of care delivery. As the Medical Informatics Director for Artificial Intelligence Clinical Integration at Stanford Health Care, he also helps lead the integration efforts of clinical AI for the health system. He is also the medical director for the Stanford Emerging Apps Lab (SEAL), which builds novel digital apps for clinicians at Stanford Health Care.

    Ron's work spans across multiple disciplines, including clinical medicine, data science, digital health, information technology, design thinking, process improvement, and implementation science. Current areas of focus include using machine learning to improve advance care planning, care of clinically deteriorating patients, and the expansion of virtual care networks. He has consulted for various companies in the digital health and artificial intelligence space, and is leading work in AI and UXR in partnership with Google Health. He is an attending physician on the inpatient medicine teaching service at Stanford Hospital, and is a core faculty for the Stanford Clinical Informatics Fellowship.

  • David Liang, MD, PhD

    David Liang, MD, PhD

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular) at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    Bio Stanford researchers are creating a micro-device that physicians could guide through the body to help diagnose and treat clogged arteries and other diseases. Tethered to the outside world by a thin wire, a tiny machine creeps through blood vessels, searching out deadly plaques and obliterating them with a zap of a laser. While a laser will come later, for now David Liang, MD, PhD, is focusing on a tiny eye that could give physicians an unprecedented view into blood vessels.

  • Charles Liao

    Charles Liao

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Educational Curriculum: Working with Professional Interpreters

  • Ronglih Liao

    Ronglih Liao

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    Bio Dr. Liao is a Professor of Medicine and co-Director of Stanford Cardiac Amyloid Center. The major goal of her research program focuses on understanding the mechanisms that underlie the pathophysiology of heart failure and developing novel treatments to combat this process. Her laboratory has played an international leading role in the study of amyloid light chain (AL) cardiomyopathy, a rare and fatal form of cardiovascular disease. We have described the underlying pathophysiologic basis for amyloid cardiomyopathy and found that the circulating amyloidogenic light chain proteins that characterize this disease directly result in a specific cardiotoxic response. Consequently, our research work has redefined AL cardiomyopathy and has raised new treatment approaches. More recently, her research efforts have expanded to include transthyretin (ATTR) cardiac amyloidosis.

    In line with her goal of revealing novel therapeutic strategies for patients with cardiovascular disease, our efforts have also focused on characterizing and harnessing endogenous cardiac regenerative mechanisms. Her laboratory initially demonstrated the therapeutic potential of exogenous primitive muscle cells delivered to the injured heart. This work was among the earliest milestones in the field and served as the basis for an international trial of cell-based therapy. Subsequently, Liao lab identified and characterized a population of cardiac progenitor cells and its relationship and dynamic activity following cardiac injury in the adult heart. Her laboratory aims to reveal the molecular mechanisms regulating the endogenous regenerative capacity of the heart and to harness such repair mechanisms for the treatment of cardiovascular disease. Dr. Liao has lectured extensively on both amyloid cardiomyopathy and stem cell biology, and have maintained a history of independent NIH funding in these areas for more than two decades.

    Over the course of her academic career, she has taken the greatest pride in mentoring the next generation of scientists. Dr. Liao has had the privilege to supervise several dozen students, postdoctoral fellows, and junior faculty, many of whom have gone on to independent academic careers at the highest institutions. Her contribution to the advancement of scientific knowledge also includes lecturing at various university and academic institutions as well as at scores of conferences and symposia locally, nationally, and internationally.

  • Michaela Liedtke

    Michaela Liedtke

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Hematology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests 1) Design of phase I/II trials for the treatment of Multiple Myeloma and Amyloidosis

    2) Conduct of clinical trials to improve the treatment of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)

    3) Outcomes research using clinical databases for patients with Multiple Myeloma and Amyloidosis

    4) Characterization of the molecular mechanism of MLL-induced acute leukemia

  • Michael Lim, M.D.

    Michael Lim, M.D.

    Professor of Neurosurgery and, by courtesy, of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Therapy) and of Medicine (Oncology)

    Bio Dr. Lim is the Chair of the Department of Neurosurgery and a board-certified neurosurgeon specializing in brain tumors and trigeminal neuralgia.

    Dr. Lim?s clinical interests include the treatment of benign and malignant brain tumors, with special interest in gliomas, meningiomas, metastatic tumors, and skull base tumors. Dr. Lim also specializes in surgical treatments for trigeminal neuralgia. During his time at Johns Hopkins, Dr. Lim built one of the largest brain tumor and trigeminal neuralgia practices and utilized the most advanced surgical technologies and techniques for his patients. As a passionate voice for patient experience, he has been recognized by his peers and patients for his integrity and compassionate care, including a Service Excellence Award from HealthNetwork Foundation.

    As a mentor, he has garnered numerous teaching awards, including being honored as an outstanding teacher by Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He is actively involved in shaping education for neurosurgery and oncology across the United States and around the world.

    Dr. Lim?s research interests focus on harnessing the immune system to fight cancer. His laboratory focuses on understanding mechanisms of immune evasion by cancer cells. He has successfully translated his findings from the laboratory to the clinics and has conducted and led several large national immunotherapy clinical trials for brain tumors.

    Dr. Lim?s bibliography contains well over 200 articles on topics such as immunotherapy for glioblastoma, long-term survival of glioma patients treated with stereotactic radiation, and treatment of neuropathic pain. His work has appeared in Science Translational Medicine, Clinical Cancer Research, Lancet Oncology, Nature Immunology, and many more publications. He also has written 20 book chapters and monographs.

    Dr. Lim is a world leader in immunotherapy for brain tumors. In addition to being invited world-wide to give lectures and seminars, he has given platform presentations on the topics of immunotherapy for brain tumors, neurosurgical techniques and management of brain tumors at the American Society of Clinical Oncologists, American Academy of Neurological Surgeons, Radiological Society of North America, Annual Symposium on Brain and Spine Metastases, Congress of Neurological Surgeons, and other meetings. In addition, he has served as platform chairman of the CNS session at the American Society for Clinical Oncology conference.

    Dr. Lim is a member of the American Society for Clinical Oncology, Congress of Neurological Surgeons, American Association of Neurological Surgeons, and Society for Neuro-Oncology. Dr. Lim served as the program co-chair of the Society for Neuro-Oncology and CNS section of the American Society for Clinical Oncology. He also served on many executive committees, including the Executive Committee for the Joint Tumor Section of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons and Congress of Neurological Surgeons.

  • David Limsui

    David Limsui

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Gastroenterology & Hepatology

    Bio Throughout my career I have been extensively involved in post-graduate medical education and training of residents and fellows. I served on the AGA Future Trends Committee tasked with reporting the future of gastroenterology training programs and have been admitted into the AGA Academy of Educators. I joined Stanford for the incredible opportunity to be part of a dynamic division with excellent and dedicated faculty where one can achieve their greatest potential. I share the honor and privilege of leading our fellowship program and in the joy of teaching such talented and inspiring fellows. Together we strive to provide the best educational experience for our fellows to become outstanding gastroenterologists and future leaders in academic medicine.
    My subspecialty areas of focus are inflammatory bowel disease and general gastroenterology.

  • Bryant Lin

    Bryant Lin

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests -Digital Health Application and Medical device design, prototyping, testing and clinical trials
    -Behavioral determinants of chronic disease
    -Novel diagnostic processes for medical mysteries
    -Asian Health

  • Janice Lin

    Janice Lin

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Immunology & Rheumatology

    Bio Dr. Lin specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of rheumatologic conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, myositis, gout, and seronegative spondyloarthropathies. She received additional training in autoimmune skin diseases and has a special clinical and research interest for psoriasis/psoriatic arthritis, dermatomyositis, cutaneous lupus/systemic lupus. She leads a combined rheumatology-dermatology clinic with Dr. Matthew Lewis in the dermatology department to take care patients collaboratively. Dr. Lin is a graduate of USSONAR (Ultrasound School of North American Rheumatologists) program and performs diagnostic musculoskeletal ultrasound evaluation and interventions. In addition to her clinical work, she leads the quality improvement effort for the division and her most recent projects are focused on patient-reported outcome in rheumatoid arthritis and vaccinations for patients in the rheumatology clinic.

  • Steven Lin

    Steven Lin

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Artificial intelligence in healthcare
    Primary care and population health
    Value added medical education

  • Evelyn Bin Ling

    Evelyn Bin Ling

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine

    Bio Evelyn Ling, M.D., M.S. is a Clinical Instructor at Stanford School of Medicine. She completed her M.D. degree and her internal medicine residency at the University of California at Davis in 2017. Prior to her medical training, she received her B.S. in biomedical computation and M.S. in Management Science and Engineering from Stanford University. In medical school and residency, she worked on projects in quality improvement (medication reconciliation in the hospital setting), medical education (clinical reasoning development) and health care technology (remote diabetes management). At ValleyCare, she has continues to be involved in medical education as the site co-director for Practice of Medicine course (POM) for second year physician assistant students as well as quality improvement projects in ED admissions and wellness. She is a Bay Area native and is excited to be working with the East Bay community.

  • Anne Liu

    Anne Liu

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Immunology and Allergy

    Bio Dr. Liu is a board-certified, fellowship-trained specialist in allergy/immunology and infectious disease. She is also a clinical associate professor in the Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases and the Department of Pediatrics, Division of Allergy, Immunology, and Rheumatology at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Liu treats infections in patients with compromised immune systems, whether due to a primary immune deficiency or a condition like cancer or organ transplant. She helps patients to develop tolerance to medications they are allergic to so that they can receive the best, and sometimes the only, treatments available to them. She also treats allergies to antibiotics, aspirin, NSAIDs, chemotherapy, and more. She sees patients both long term and for urgent referrals, such as in cases of perioperative anaphylaxis. Dr. Liu also helps pediatric patients manage drug and food allergies.

    One of Dr. Liu?s areas of focus is helping patients with allergies to antibiotics determine when they have lost an allergy, what antibiotics they can tolerate, and when to induce tolerance to an antibiotic. This not only can benefit the patient, but also have a positive public health impact, as labeling patients with a penicillin allergy may negatively affect their care and increase use
    of broad-spectrum antibiotics.

    She collaborates closely with colleagues from other disciplines, including pulmonology, otolaryngology, oncology, cardiology, dermatology, anesthesiology, and surgery. Her key objective in working with referring physicians is to help them safely deliver the best care for their patients.

    For patients and families, Dr. Liu strives to help them navigate their care journey with as much ease and dignity as possible during what may be the most challenging time of their life. Her goal is to offer patients options, even when it may appear that they have no options left.

    Dr. Liu?s research interests include optimizing care of patients with antibiotic allergies, including through use of decision support tools.

    Dr. Liu has authored articles in the New England Journal of Medicine, Journal of Immunology, Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology in Practice, Clinical and Experimental Allergy, Mucosal Immunology, Diagnostic Microbiology and Infectious Disease, Science, and other publications. Dr. Liu authored the book chapter ?Hypersensitivity Reactions to Monoclonal Antibodies? in Drug Allergy Testing.

    Dr. Liu is certified in infectious disease by the American Board of Internal Medicine and in allergy and immunology by the American Board of Allergy and Immunology. She is also a member of the American College of Physicians, Infectious Diseases Society of America, and American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology.

    She has given presentations on antibiotic allergies, drug desensitization, and aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease, among other topics. Dr. Liu?s honors include recognition from the American Academy of Asthma, Allergy, and Immunology, the American Medical Women?s Association, and the National Institutes of Health.

  • Christine Kee Liu

    Christine Kee Liu

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr. Liu and her research program are dedicated to improving the lives of older adults with kidney disease. Currently her research focuses on mobility, which is the ability to move safely and reliably from one place to another. In older adults, poor mobility strongly predicts future disability and death. Retaining mobility has been cited by older adults as fundamental to quality to life; yet many older persons with kidney disease, especially those with late stage chronic kidney disease or outright kidney failure, have trouble just walking across the room or transferring to a chair. Dually trained in geriatric medicine and epidemiology, Dr. Liu also has significant expertise in older adult clinical trials, including safety trials of novel agents as well as intervention studies to reduce infections in older populations.

  • Karl Lorenz

    Karl Lorenz

    Professor of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health) at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Medical Center

    Bio Dr. Karl Lorenz, MD MSHS is a general internal medicine and palliative care physician, and Section chief of the VA Palo Alto-Stanford Palliative Care Program. Formerly at the VA Greater Los Angeles, Dr. Lorenz directed palliative care research at the VA Center for Innovation to Implementation and served on the faculty at the UCLA School of Medicine. Dr. Lorenz is a member of the VA?s national Hospice and Palliative Care Program (HPC) leadership team, director of the operational palliative care Quality Improvement Resource Center (QuIRC), and adjunct facility staff member at RAND. Dr. Lorenz?s work and leadership has been influential to the field of palliative care research. Under Dr. Lorenz?s leadership, since 2009 the Quality Improvement Resource Center (QuIRC) has served as one of three national leadership Centers responsible for strategic and operational support of the VA?s national hospice and palliative care programs. QuIRC develops and implements provider facing electronic tools for the VA?s national electronic medical record to improve the quality of palliative care. In that role, Dr. Lorenz participates with the national leadership team in strategic planning, policy development, and providing resources to support operational efforts. Dr. Lorenz has contributed to the field of global palliative care, serving the World Health Organization in its development of Palliative Care for Older People and leading methods for Palliative Care Essential Medications.

  • Kate Lorig

    Kate Lorig

    Professor (Research) of Medicine (Immunology and Rheumatology), Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Community based psycoeducational intervention studies of disease self management for people with chronic diseases. arthritis, lung diseases, heart disease AIDs, low back pain and diabetes. Programs and studies in Spanish and English. Interventions are in small groups, mailed or on the Internet.

  • Justin Lotfi, MD

    Justin Lotfi, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We enrolled four undergraduates into an independent study course and monitor how their outreach toward patients affects population health control.

  • Anson Lowe

    Anson Lowe

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Gastroenterology and Hepatology), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The laboratory is focused on the relationship between injury, wound healing, and cancer. Esophageal, gastric, and pancreatic cancers are a focus. We are particularly interested in the regulation of cell signaling by EGFR, the EGF receptor. In addition to cancer pathogenesis, active projects include the development of new diagnostic assays and drugs.

  • Henry J. Lowe, MD

    Henry J. Lowe, MD

    Associate Professor of Medicine (General Medical Disciplines) at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research in the field of biomedical informatics over the past 30 years has focused on the development of novel uses of information technology and computer science to improve human health. My current interests include the Electronic Health Record (EHR), biomedical knowledge representation, Internet applications in healthcare, clinical data warehouses, clinical data and text mining, academic social networking and the use of information technology to support clinical and translational research.

  • Norman Lowenbraun

    Norman Lowenbraun

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Bio Dr Lowenbraun has been a practicing cardiologist in the Bay Area for over 25 years, having moved here after receiving his medical and specialty training on the East Coast. He believes offering the personal care of a community setting and empowering the patient in their healthcare decisions, combined with the resources of Stanford Hospital , offers his patients the best of both worlds.

  • Robert Lowsky

    Robert Lowsky

    Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Lowsky's research is focused on understanding the role of regulatory T cells in the prevention of GVHD and in promoting immune tolerance following organ transplantation.

  • Stephen Luby

    Stephen Luby

    Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute and the Freeman Spogli Institute and Professor, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Luby?s research interests include identifying and interrupting pathways of infectious disease transmission in low income countries. He works primarily in Bangladesh.

  • George Lui

    George Lui

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Adult Congenital Heart Disease

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