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Academic Appointments


  • Clinical Instructor, Medicine

Publications

All Publications


  • How Much Time are Physicians and Nurses Spending Together at the Patient Bedside? Journal of hospital medicine Sang, A. X., Tisdale, R. L., Nielsen, D., Loica-Mersa, S., Miller, T., Chong, I., Shieh, L. 2019; 14: E1?E6

    Abstract

    BACKGROUND: Bedside rounding involving both nurses and physicians has numerous benefits for patients and staff. However, precise quantitative data on the current extent of physician-nurse (MD-RN) overlap at the patient bedside are lacking.OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to examine the frequency of nurse and physician overlap at the patient beside and what factors affect this frequency.DESIGN: This is a prospective, observational study of time-motion data generated from wearable radio frequency identification (RFID)-based locator technology.SETTING: Single-institution academic hospital.MEASUREMENTS: The length of physician rounds, frequency of rounds that include nurses simultaneously at the bedside, and length of MD-RN overlap were measured and analyzed by ward, day of week, and distance between patient room and nursing station.RESULTS: A total of 739 MD rounding events were captured over 90 consecutive days. Of these events, 267 took place in single-bed patient rooms. The frequency of MD-RN overlap was 30.0%, and there was no statistical difference between the three wards studied. Overall, the average length of all MD rounds was 7.31 0.58 minutes, but rounding involving a bedside nurse lasted longer than rounds with MDs alone (9.56 vs 5.68 minutes, P < .05). There was no difference in either the length of rounds or the frequency of MD-RN overlap between weekdays and weekends. Finally, patient rooms located farther away from the nursing station had a lower likelihood of MD-RN overlap (Pearson's r = -0.67, P < .05).CONCLUSION: RFID-based technology provides precise, automated, and high-throughput time-motion data to capture nurse and physician activity. At our institution, 30.0% of rounds involve a bedside nurse, highlighting a potential barrier to bedside interdisciplinary rounding.

    View details for DOI 10.12788/jhm.3204

    View details for PubMedID 31112496

  • What's in a Name? Factors That Influence the Usage of Generic Versus Trade Names for Cardiac Medications Among Healthcare Providers CIRCULATION-CARDIOVASCULAR QUALITY AND OUTCOMES Ouyang, D., Tisdale, R., Cheng, P., Chi, J., Chen, J. H., Ashley, E. 2018; 11 (8)
  • Acetaminophen or Tylenol? A Retrospective Analysis of Medication Digital Communication Practices JOURNAL OF GENERAL INTERNAL MEDICINE Ouyang, D., Tisdale, R., Ashley, E., Chi, J., Chen, J. H. 2018; 33 (8): 1218?20
  • Acetaminophen or Tylenol? A Retrospective Analysis of Medication Digital Communication Practices. Journal of general internal medicine Ouyang, D., Tisdale, R., Ashley, E., Chi, J., Chen, J. H. 2018

    View details for PubMedID 29717410

  • EMR-based handoff tool improves completeness of internal medicine residents' handoffs. BMJ open quality Tisdale, R. L., Eggers, Z., Shieh, L. 2018; 7 (3): e000188

    Abstract

    Background: The majority of adverse events in healthcare involve communication breakdown. Physician-to-physician handoffs are particularly prone to communication errors, yet have been shown to be more complete when systematised according to a standardised bundle. Interventions that improve thoroughness of handoffs have not been widely studied.Aim: To measure the effect of an electronic medical record (EMR)-based handoff tool on handoff completeness.Intervention: This EMR-based handoff tool included a radio button prompting users to classify patients as stable, a 'watcher' or unstable. It automatically pulled in EMR data on the patient's 24-hour vitals, common lab tests and code status. Finally, it provided text boxes labelled 'Active Issues', 'Action List (To-Dos)' and 'If/Then' to fill in.Implementation and evaluation: Written handoffs from general and specialty (haematology, oncology, cardiology) Internal Medicine resident-run inpatient wards were evaluated on a randomly chosen representative sample of days in April and May 2015 at Stanford University Medical Center, focusing on a predefined set of content elements. The intervention was then implemented in June 2015 with postintervention data collected in an identical fashion in August to September 2016.Results: Handoff completeness improved significantly (p<0.0001). Improvement in inclusion of illness severity was notable for its magnitude and its importance in establishing a consistent mental model of a patient. Elements that automatically pulled in data and those prompting users to actively fill in data both improved.Conclusion: A simple EMR-based handoff tool providing a mix of frameworks for completion and automatic pull-in of objective data improved handoff completeness. This suggests that EMR-based interventions may be effective at improving handoffs, possibly leading to fewer medical errors and better patient care.

    View details for DOI 10.1136/bmjoq-2017-000188

    View details for PubMedID 30019013

  • What's in a Name? Factors That Influence the Usage of Generic Versus Trade Names for Cardiac Medications Among Healthcare Providers. Circulation. Cardiovascular quality and outcomes Ouyang, D., Tisdale, R., Cheng, P., Chi, J., Chen, J. H., Ashley, E. 2018; 11 (8): e004704

    View details for PubMedID 30354370

  • Stress and Anxiety Scores in First and Repeat IVF Cycles: A Pilot Study. PloS one Turner, K., Reynolds-May, M. F., Zitek, E. M., Tisdale, R. L., Carlisle, A. B., Westphal, L. M. 2013; 8 (5)

    View details for DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0063743

    View details for PubMedID 23717472

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