Bio

Bio


Italo M. Brown, MD MPH (Morehouse College '06, Boston University '08, Meharry Medical College '15) is an Emergency Medicine physician and Clinical Instructor in Social Emergency Medicine at Stanford Hospital. Throughout his career, Italo has been at the frontlines of social medicine and health equity. He is a former board member of the Tennessee Health Care Campaign, an organization that spearheads statewide advocacy efforts in support of the Affordable Care Act and Medicare/Medicaid Reform. Italo trained at Jacobi Medical Center and Montefiore Medical Center, two Bronx Hospitals ranked among the top 20 busiest ERs in the country. In 2017, the National Minority Quality Forum named Italo among the 40 Under 40 Leaders in Minority Health. An avid writer, Italo served with the ABC News Medical Unit, and has contributed health & wellness pieces to GQ, The Washington Post, JAMA, and The Root. He also nurtures a passion for pipeline development, working as a mentor with Tour for Diversity in Medicine. His latest role as Chief Impact Officer of TRAP Medicine, a Barbershop-based wellness initiative based in California, focuses on strategic partnerships, community outreach, and advocacy.

Clinical Focus


  • Emergency Medicine

Academic Appointments


Professional Education


  • Residency: Jacobi Montefiore Medical Centers Emergency Medicine Residency (2019) NY
  • Medical Education: Meharry Medical College Registrar (2015) TN

Publications

All Publications


  • COVID-19 Disparities and the Black Community: A Health Equity-Informed Rapid Response Is Needed. American journal of public health Brown, I. M., Khan, A., Slocum, J., Campbell, L. F., Lacey, J. R., Landry, A. M. 2020; 110 (9): 1350?51

    View details for DOI 10.2105/AJPH.2020.305804

    View details for PubMedID 32783709

  • Are Clinicians Contributing to Excess African American COVID-19 Deaths? Unbeknownst to Them, They May Be. Health equity Milam, A. J., Furr-Holden, D., Edwards-Johnson, J., Webb, B., Patton, J. W., Ezekwemba, N. C., Porter, L., Davis, T., Chukwurah, M., Webb, A. J., Simon, K., Franck, G., Anthony, J., Onuoha, G., Brown, I. M., Carson, J. T., Stephens, B. C. 2020; 4 (1): 139?41

    Abstract

    African Americans are overrepresented among reported coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases and deaths. There are a multitude of factors that may explain the African American disparity in COVID-19 outcomes, including higher rates of comorbidities. While individual-level factors predictably contribute to disparate COVID-19 outcomes, systematic and structural factors have not yet been reported. It stands to reason that implicit biases may fuel the racial disparity in COVID-19 outcomes. To address this racial disparity, we must apply a health equity lens and disaggregate data explicitly for African Americans, as well as other populations at risk for biased treatment in the health-care system.

    View details for DOI 10.1089/heq.2020.0015

    View details for PubMedID 32368712

  • Black Men's Perceptions and Knowledge of Diabetes: a Church-Affiliated Barbershop Focus Group Study JOURNAL OF RACIAL AND ETHNIC HEALTH DISPARITIES Balls-Berry, J., Watson, C., Kadimpati, S., Crockett, A., Mohamed, E. A., Brown, I., Valdez Soto, M., Sanford, B., Halyard, M., Khubchandani, J., Dacy, L., Davis, O. 2015; 2 (4): 465?72

    Abstract

    Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States and disproportionately affects racial and ethnic minorities. These disparities persist despite educational efforts to reduce the prevalence of diabetes. Receptiveness of educational efforts for Black men needs to be studied.This study assesses Black men's receptiveness to a barbershop-based program focused on diabetes prevention and awareness in a church-affiliated barbershop in Rochester, Minnesota.The pastor and barber of a church-affiliated barbershop and academic medical researchers designed a community-engaged research study to determine Black men's perception of diabetes. Recruitment for the 90-minute focus group included flyers (n=60), email, and in-person. Units of analysis included focus-group audio recording, transcripts, and field notes. Using traditional content analysis, we categorized data into themes and sub-themes.Thirteen Black men participated (Group 1, n=6; Group 2, n=7) having a mean age of 40.3 years (range 19 to 65), and employed full-time (77%). Themes included diabetes prevention, treatment, prevalence, risks, and health education. Participants identified diet and exercise as essential components of diabetes prevention. Additionally, participants mentioned that family history contributes to diabetes. Participants agreed that barbershops are an appropriate setting for data collection and health education on diabetes for Black men.Findings indicate that Black men are generally aware of diabetes. The community-engaged research process allowed for development of a culturally appropriate research study on diabetes. This study is the foundation for developing a culturally appropriate health education program on diabetes for Black men.

    View details for DOI 10.1007/s40615-015-0094-y

    View details for Web of Science ID 000218513500006

    View details for PubMedID 26594612

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC4651172

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