School of Medicine


Showing 101-200 of 235 Results

  • Laurence Katznelson, MD

    Laurence Katznelson, MD

    Professor of Neurosurgery and of Medicine (Endocrinology) at the Stanford University Medical Center, Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital and at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Katznelson is an internationally known neuroendocrinologist and clinical researcher, with research expertise in the diagnosis and management of hypopituitarism, the effects of hormones on neurocognitive function, and the development of therapeutics for acromegaly and Cushing’s syndrome, and neuroendocrine tumors. Dr. Katznelson is the medical director of the multidisciplinary Stanford Pituitary Center, a program geared for patient management, clinical research and patient education

  • Ali Khaledi Nasab

    Ali Khaledi Nasab

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Computational and theoretical neuroscience

    Biological physics

    Stochastic processes

  • Michel Kliot

    Michel Kliot

    Clinical Professor, Neurosurgery

    Bio             I grew up in New York City where I attended the oldest school in the Country, Collegiate, from 2nd grade to high school.  I then went to college at Harvard, receiving both a BA and MA, and Medical School at Yale.  Along the way I did graduate work in Neurobiology at Stanford.  I then returned to New York City and did an internship and neurosurgical residency at the Neurological Institute.  I was then given a wonderful opportunity to do a one year traveling Peripheral Nerve Fellowship in which I spent time at the University of Toronto in Canada and time at Louisiana State University in New Orleans.  I then joined the Department of Neurosurgery at the University of Washington in Seattle.  There between 1991 and 2011 I rose through the academic ranks eventually becoming a Professor and Director of the Peripheral Nerve Center, as well as Acting Head of the section of neurosurgery at the Puget Sound VA Health Care System.  I then moved to UCSF in 2012 where I headed up their peripheral nerve effort and established their Center for Evaluation and Surgical Management of Peripheral Nerve Disorders.  In the summer of 2014 I moved to join the Department of Neurosurgery at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine as Professor and Director of the Peripheral Nerve Center.  During the past year I was asked to serve as interim Chair of the Department of Neurosurgery when the Chair, a close friend and colleague, suddenly died.  At Northwestern I continue to pursue and develop my interests in the following areas:  pushing the frontiers of peripheral nerve surgery by pioneering new imaging and surgical techniques; teaching residents and medical students; collaborating with clinical and research colleagues; and continuing my ongoing interest in biotechnology by taking ideas from their inception into the clinical arena.  I am currently working part-time in the Dept of Neurosurgery at Stanford.  I remain very interested in finding ways to use the internet as a platform to educate patients and improve their care.  I also am dedicated to improving the overall patient experience.

  • Kathryn Kvam

    Kathryn Kvam

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Kvam's research focuses on how to optimize patient-centered care, patient outcomes and organize systems of care.

  • Maarten Lansberg, MD, PhD

    Maarten Lansberg, MD, PhD

    Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research involves the design and conduct of clinical trials to discover new treatments for patients who have suffered a stroke. These trials span treatment of acute stroke, stroke recovery, and stroke prevention. My research in acute stroke is primarily focused on the use of advanced neuroimaging methods (CT and MRI) to select patients who are most likely to benefit from therapies aimed at restoring blood flow to the brain in patients who have suffered a stroke.

  • Jin Hyung Lee

    Jin Hyung Lee

    Associate Professor of Neurology, of Neurosurgery and of Bioengineering and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests In vivo visualization and control of neural circuits

  • Wonjae Lee

    Wonjae Lee

    Instructor, Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests One of the key characteristics of life is the dynamic cross-scale interactions across different levels of biological organization, such as molecules, genes, cells, tissues, organs and an organism, in their own multi-scaled environmental contexts. The dynamic property of these interactions results in variation in physiological traits across individuals, shaping individuality of an organism. The overall research direction of my laboratory is to establish in vitro experimental platforms in which we can investigate this cross-scale interaction efficiently to develop personalized therapeutic strategies. Because many aspects of cross-scale interactions are mediated by blood circulation and crosstalk between the vasculature and perivascular tissues, our current efforts are focused on engineering the functional vasculatures in pathophysiological conditions of various human tissues. We have successfully developed in vitro experimental models equipped with the capacity of real-time monitoring of individual cell behaviors, which enables effective identification of the vascular routes that induce desirable behaviors of endogenous or exogenously grafted cells. Our in vitro model allows precise and independent control of the experimental parameters in highly time- and cost- efficient ways and facilitates the development of therapeutic and preventive treatment strategies in consideration of the phenotype variations across the patient population.

  • Michael Leong

    Michael Leong

    Clinical Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests - Intrathecal / Intraspinal Analgesics
    - Ziconotide (Prialt)
    - Resiniferatoxin
    - Industry-supported clinical trials

  • Gordon Li, MD

    Gordon Li, MD

    Associate Professor of Neurosurgery and, by courtesy, of Neurology and of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests 1.) My laboratory studies the biology of brain tumors with the goal of developing novel therapeutics for the treatment of malignant brain tumors and translating that research into clinical trials.
    2.) My clinical interests include improving surgical techniques for brain tumor surgery, immunotherapy for the treatment of glioblastoma, and novel uses for stereotactic radiosurgery.

  • Li Li

    Li Li

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Neurosurgery

    Bio My research interest is to understand the fundamental mechanisms of mitochondrial dynamics and movement in brain ageing and disease.

  • Frank M. Longo, MD, PhD

    Frank M. Longo, MD, PhD

    George E. and Lucy Becker Professor in Medicine and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Clinical interests include Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease and the development of effective therapeutics for these disorders. Laboratory interests encompass the elucidation of signaling mechanisms relevant to neurodegenerative disorders and the development of novel small molecule approaches for the treatment of neurodegenerative and other neurological disorders.

  • Jaime Lopez, MD

    Jaime Lopez, MD

    Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My clinical interests are in the areas of Intraoperative Neurophysiologic Monitoring (IOM), clinical neurophysiology, electromyopgraphy and in the use of botulinum toxins in the treatment of neurologic disorders. Our IOM group’s research is in the development of new and innovative techniques for monitoring the nervous system during surgical and endovascular procedures and how these alter surgical management and patient outcomes. I am also active in formulating national IOM practice guidelines.

  • Zhonglin Lyu

    Zhonglin Lyu

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Neurosurgery

    Bio Dr. Lyu is a postdoctoral scholar in the Department of Neurosurgery at Stanford University. He obtained his PhD at Soochow University, China, where he gained training in Biomedical Engineering and led multidisciplinary research under the advice of Prof. Hong Chen. During his PhD, he worked as a visiting student researcher at Canary Center at Stanford for Early Cancer Detection where he gained training in microfluidics and cancer metastasis.

    Under the guidance of Prof. Jon Park and Dr. Wonjae Lee, the overall goal of Dr. Lyu?s research is to develop an in vitro stroke model and use it as a platform to look for stem cell therapy for stroke treatment.

  • Mojtaba Madadi Asl

    Mojtaba Madadi Asl

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Neurosurgery

    Bio Mojtaba is a postdoctoral fellow at the Department of Neurosurgery, Stanford University School of Medicine. Given his background in physics, he carries out research in the fields of theoretical and computational neuroscience with an interest in time delay dynamics, dynamical systems, synaptic plasticity and spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP). He is determined to understand the impact of propagation delays on the effects of stimulation patterns for computational optimization of therapeutic brain stimulation techniques. To this end, he studies how dendritic and axonal propagation delays shape neuronal activity and synaptic connectivity patterns in plastic neuronal networks.

  • Kelly Mahaney

    Kelly Mahaney

    Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr. Mahaney is a Pediatric Neurosurgeon with clinical interest in Hydrocephalus, Craniovertebral Junction abnormalities, Spasticity, Spinal dysraphism and Myelomeningocele, Central Nervous System tumors, and Pediatric Epilepsy surgery. She completed residency training at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics and subspecialty Pediatric Neurosurgery training at The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto and the Barrow Neurologic Institute at Phoenix Children's Hospital. She is interested in advancing Neuro-endoscopic techniques in Pediatric Neurosurgical practice. Dr. Mahaney's research focuses on delineating the role of iron in the development of post-hemorrhagic hydrocephalus.

  • Stephen Lawrence McKenna

    Stephen Lawrence McKenna

    Staff, Neurosurgery

    Bio Dr. Stephen McKenna is a founding member of the Stanford Partnership for Spinal Cord Injury and Repair. Dr. McKenna is the Chief of the Rehabilitation Trauma Center; as well as, the site director of the Advanced Spinal Cord Injury Medicine Fellowship at SCVMC.

    As a Neurocritical Care physician, he specializes in ventilator dependent Spinal Cord and Traumatic Brain Injury; as well as, neuromuscular diseases. Dr. McKenna has practiced for more than 10 years and is an invited reviewer for the Journal Critical Care as well as Spinal Cord - Nature. He has led first-in-human clinical trials ranging from vaccines for HIV to stem cell derived oligodendrocyte progenitor cell based therapies for spinal cord injury.

    Clinical Focus:
    Spinal Cord Injury
    Traumatic Brain Injury
    Guillain-Barré Syndrome
    Anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis
    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)
    Neuromyelitis Optica (Devic disease)

    Professional Education:
    Board Certification: Neurocritical Care, United Council for Neurologic Subspecialties (2008)
    Board Certification: Internal Medicine, American Board of Internal Medicine (2005)
    Residency: Santa Clara Valley Medical Center (2005) CA
    Internship: Santa Clara Valley Medical Center (2002) CA
    Medical Education: Stanford University School of Medicine (2002) CA

    Book Chapter:
    Shah A, Shem K, McKenna SL, Berlly M. Management of Respiratory Failure in Spinal Cord Injury. Spinal Cord Medicine (Hardcover) by Steven, M.D. Kirshblum (Editor) Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2011

    Selected Publications:
    Pulmonary outcomes following specialized respiratory management for acute cervical spinal cord injury: a retrospective analysis.
    SPINAL CORD
    Zakrasek EC, Nielson JL, Kosarchuk JJ3, Crew JD, Ferguson AR, McKenna SL
    2017; Feb 21. PMID: 28220822

    Dose Response Effect of Exposure to Hypotension on Expected Neurological Recovery in Individuals With Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury.
    ARCHIVES OF PM&R
    Reza, E., Stück, E., Endo, J., Isaac, L., Beattie, M., Ferguson, A. and McKenna, S.
    2016: DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2016.09.016

    Combined SCI and TBI: recovery of forelimb function after unilateral cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) is retarded by contralateral traumatic brain injury (TBI), and ipsilateral TBI balances the effects of SCI on paw placement.
    EXPERIMENTAL NEUROLOGY
    Inoue T, Lin A, Ma X, McKenna SL, Creasey GH, Manley GT, Ferguson AR, Bresnahan JC, Beattie MS.
    2013 Oct 248: 136-47. PMID: 23770071

    Functional electrical stimulation in spinal cord injury respiratory care.
    TOPICS IN SPINAL CORD REHAB.
    R Jarosz, M Littlepage, G Creasey, S McKenna
    2012:Vol. 18, No. 4, 315-321. PMID: 23459661

    Impact of mean arterial blood pressure during the first seven days post spinal cord injury.
    TOPICS IN SPINAL CORD REHAB.
    J Cohn, J Wright, S McKenna, T Bushnik
    2010: DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1310/sci1503-96

    Successful Pregnancy and Delivery in a C1 ASIA A Spinal Cord Injured Woman: The Role of Coordinated Care Between PM&R and Obstetrics Services: A Case Report.
    PM&R
    Lin C, McKenna S, Shem K
    2010: DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pmrj.2010.07.461

    Pancreatic tumor motion on a single planning 4D-CT does not correlate with intrafraction tumor motion during treatment.
    AM J CLIN ONCOL.
    Minn A, Schellenberg D, Maxim P, Suh Y, McKenna S, Cox B, Dieterich S, Xing L, Graves E, Goodman K, Chang D, Koong A.
    2009 Aug;32(4):364-8 PMID: 19398901

    The impact of project closure on HIV incidence and mortality in a cohort of couples in Lusaka, Zambia.
    AIDS CARE
    Stephenson R, Shutes E, McKenna S, Allen S, Brill I, Kancheya N, Zulu I, Sinkala M, Tichacek A, Chomba E.
    2008 Jul;20(6):683-91. PMID: 18576170

    Rapid HIV testing and counseling for voluntary testing centers in Africa.
    AIDS
    McKenna SL, Muyinda GK, Roth D, Mwali M, Ng'andu N, Myrick A, Luo C, Priddy FH, Hall VM, von Lieven AA, Sabatino JR, Mark K, Allen SA.
    1997 Sep;11 Suppl 1:S103-10. PMID: 9376093

  • Antonio Meola, MD, PhD

    Antonio Meola, MD, PhD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurosurgery

    Bio Antonio Meola M.D. Ph.D graduated Summa cum Laude and Research Honors at the University of Pisa, Italy, in 2008, and completed his residency training in Neurosurgery at the same Institution in July 2015. Dr Meola attended a Ph.D. program at the University of Florence, Italy, where he discussed a doctoral thesis entitled "A New Head-Mounted Display-based Augmented Reality System in Neurosurgical Oncology: a study on phantom".
    Since 2/2014 to 1/2015 Dr Meola completed a Research Fellowship in Neurosurgical anatomy at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC), under the Direction of Dr. Juan C. Fernandez-Miranda. The main focus of his research was the surgical neuroanatomy of the white matter tracts of the human brain.
    Since 7/2015 to 6/2016 Dr Meola served as Clinical Fellow in Image-Guided Neurosurgery at the Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, in Boston, MA (Director: Dr. Alexandra J. Golby M.D.). During the fellowship, he focused on the clinical application and integration of advanced imaging techniques, including intraoperative-MRI, intraoperative US, functional MRI, tractography.
    Since 7/2016 to 6/2017 Dr Meola completed a Neurosurgical Oncology Fellowship at the Cleveland Clinic in Cleveland, OH, devoting his efforts to minimally-invasive neurosurgical techniques, such as Laser interstitial Thermal Therapy (LITT) and stereotactic radiosurgery (Gamma Knife), as well as to awake neurosurgery.
    Starting 7/2017, Dr Meola joined the Department of Neurosurgery at Stanford. Dr. Meola mainly focuses on conventional and innovative treatments for brain and skull base tumors, including both surgery and stereotactic radiosurgery (CyberKnife).

  • Aaron Milstein

    Aaron Milstein

    Instructor, Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Aaron Milstein studies how dynamic synapses, neuronal cellular diversity, network connectivity, and plasticity mediate learning and memory. He trained with Roger Nicoll, Jeff Magee, and Sandro Romani, employing electrophysiology, optogenetics, pharmacology, and computational modeling to investigate information processing in neuronal circuits. Currently Aaron uses modern parallel computing methods to simulate spatial memory encoding in the hippocampus and its disfunction in epilepsy.

  • Michelle Monje

    Michelle Monje

    Associate Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery, of Pediatrics, of Pathology and of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Monje Lab studies the molecular and cellular mechanisms of postnatal neurodevelopment. This includes microenvironmental influences on neural precursor cell fate choice in normal neurodevelopment and in disease states.

  • Seema Nagpal, MD

    Seema Nagpal, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I'm a board certified neuro-oncologist who treats both primary brain tumors as well as metastatic disease to the brain and nervous system. My research concentrates on clinical trials for patients with late-stage central nervous system cancer. I have a special interest in leptomeningeal disease, a devastating complication of lung and breast cancers. I collaborate with Stanford scientists to detect this disease earlier, and with our breast and lung oncologists to improve outcomes for patients.

  • Jayakar V. Nayak, MD, PhD

    Jayakar V. Nayak, MD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (Rhinology) and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Upper Airway Stem Cell Biology, Fate, and Repair/Regeneration of the Airway Epithelium to treat Upper and Lower Airway Disorders

  • Ryan Nitta

    Ryan Nitta

    Sr Res Scientist-Basic Life, Neurosurgery

    Current Role at Stanford The main project of the Li lab is to elucidate the signaling pathways responsible for maintaining and initiating brain tumor growth. Previously the Li lab has identified an interesting protein, known as casein kinase 2, which plays an integral role in adult brain tumor growth. My goal is to expand on this initial finding and determine if casein kinase 2 could be a therapeutically relevant drug target in adult brain tumors and whether this protein plays a role in pediatric brain tumors. The role of the candidate would be the lead researcher on these projects, as well as managing and leading the undergraduate and medical students in the lab. In addition, I am responsible for maintaining the laboratory and assisting in grant writing.

  • Paul Nuyujukian

    Paul Nuyujukian

    Assistant Professor of Bioengineering and of Neurosurgery and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our group explores neuroengineering and its application to both basic and clinical neuroscience. Our goal is to develop brain-machine interfaces as a platform technology for a variety of brain-related medical conditions including stroke and epilepsy.

  • Theo Palmer

    Theo Palmer

    Professor of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Members of the Palmer Lab study the biology of neural stem cells in brain development and in the adult. Our primary goal is to understand how genes and environment synergize in influencing stem cell behavior during development and how mild genetic or environmental risk factors for disease may synergize in their detrimental effects on brain development or in the risk of neuronal loss in age-related degenerative disease.

  • Jon Park, MD, FRCSC

    Jon Park, MD, FRCSC

    Saunders Family Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Non-fusion dynamic spinal stabilization, artificial disc technologies, and regenerative spinal technologies.

  • Jonathon J. Parker, MD, PhD

    Jonathon J. Parker, MD, PhD

    Affiliate, Dean's Office Operations - Dean Other

    Bio Dr. Parker is currently a PGY6 Neurosurgery Resident at Stanford. He has focused his training and research on minimally invasive treatments for epilepsy and movement disorders in Adults and Children. He has focused his training to develop expertise in open microsurgical resection techniques, laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT), focused ultrasound (MRgFUS), Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS), Responsive Neurostimulation (RNS), electrocorticography (ECoG), stereo-electro-encephalography (SEEG), and robotic-assisted surgery.

    Dr. Parker completed a year long enfolded fellowship in Adult and Pediatric Epilepsy & Functional Surgery with Dr. Gerald Grant and Dr. Casey Halpern. Guided by his surgical mentors, Dr. Parker has utilized state of the art approaches to improve epilepsy surgery by combing SEEG, 3D printing, whole brain tractography, and navigated operative exoscopes to guide safe surgical resections of epileptic foci. Dr. Parker's research revolves around optimizing SEEG techniques for intracranial evaluation of epileptic foci and clinically-relevant brain mapping via understanding the role of white matter in seizure propagation.

  • Josef Parvizi, MD, PhD

    Josef Parvizi, MD, PhD

    Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr Parvizi completed his medical internship at Mayo Clinic and Neurology Residency at BIDMC Harvard Medical School before joining the UCLA for fellowship training in clinical neurophysiology and epilepsy. He has worked at Stanford University Medical Center since 2007 and specializes in treating patients with uncontrollable seizures. Dr. Parvizi is the principal investigator in the Laboratory of Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience whose research activities have been supported by National Institute of Health, National Science Foundation, and private foundations. To find out more about Dr Parvizi's scholarly activities please visit http://med.stanford.edu/parvizi-lab.html.

  • Zara Patel

    Zara Patel

    Associate Professor of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery (Rhinology) and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr. Zara M. Patel is Director of Endoscopic Skull Base Surgery and an Associate Professor of Otolaryngology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at Stanford. She was born and raised in St. Louis, completed her MD at the Oregon Health and Sciences University in Portland, Oregon and completed her residency training in otolaryngology at Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York, NY. After pursuing fellowship training in rhinology and endoscopic skull base surgery at Stanford University, she was recruited to join the Emory University faculty in Atlanta in 2011. After four years, the rhinology division recruited her back to the West coast to rejoin the department here at Stanford University.

    Dr. Patel is an expert in advanced endoscopic sinus and skull base surgery. She treats patients with a wide variety of rhinologic complaints, including chronic sinus infection or inflammation, sinus disease that has failed medical therapy, sinus disease that has failed prior surgical therapy, cerebrospinal fluid leaks, benign and and malignant sinus and skull base tumors, as well as olfactory disorders.

    She is immediate past-Chair of the Education Committee and now Member of the Board of Directors for the American Rhinologic Society and has developed a multitude of educational materials for both physicians and patients to help them better understand rhinologic disorders. She is passionate about educating patients to allow them to make the best decisions about their own care, leading to better outcomes.

    Dr. Patel has published widely in topics such as avoiding complications in endoscopic sinus surgery, chronic rhinosinusitis in the immunosuppressed patient population, new devices and techniques for endoscopic skull base surgery, and olfactory dysfunction. She continues to perform research in these areas, and is beginning collaborative efforts with neuroscientists and engineers to develop technology that she hopes will eventually help cure patients with olfactory loss.

  • Claudia Katharina Petritsch

    Claudia Katharina Petritsch

    Associate Professor (Research) of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We study cell fate mechanisms to understand intra-tumoral heterogeneity and overcome therapy resistance and immune suppression in brain tumors.

    Excessive proliferation, apoptotic evasion, and migratory spread are all hallmarks of tumorigenesis. However, these defects fail to explain the incredible heterogeneity and immune suppression observed in malignant brain tumors, two major hurdles to their treatment, which remains mostly palliative. Only once we elucidate the underlying biologic causes for heterogeneity and immune suppression, will we develop better treatment options for brain tumor patients and prevent malignant progression and tumor growth.

    In the healthy brain, neural stem cells generate progenitors, which in turn give rise to differentiating cells that will eventually acquire their final functional state. Cell fate decisions within these hierarchical brain cell lineages are tightly controlled and irreversible: e.g. cells in the state of differentiation will not turn into progenitor cells or stem cells. It is known that brain tumor cells, on the other hand, defy many general principles of neurobiology. This is especially true for malignant glioma cells, which simultaneously express markers of different lineages and states exhibiting incomplete differentiation. Tumor cell hierarchies are poorly understood, providing no explanation for why tumor cells with stem-like, progenitor-like, and differentiated features co-exist and interact with normal brain cells and immune-infiltrating cells within a single tumor entity, and how this heterogeneity relates to the lack of active immune infiltration.

    The Petritsch lab broadly investigates underlying causes for the intra-tumoral heterogeneity and immune suppression in brain tumors from a developmental neurobiology perspective. Defects in cell fate control could explain many key defects present in brain tumors and an understanding of how brain cells control the fate of their progeny may identify novel points of vulnerabilities to target with therapeutics. Of special emphasis, we study the establishment of cell fates within normal hierarchical brain lineages for comparison to the dysregulated cell-fate hierarchies seen in brain tumors. Our lab was the first to demonstrate that normal adult oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) undergo asymmetric divisions to make cell fate decisions, i.e. to generate OPCs as well as differentiating cells each time they divide. Drawing from these data, we investigate whether brain tumors divide along hierarchical lineages and how oncogenic mutations might affect cell fate decisions within these hierarchies. A major line of investigation in our lab focuses on whether defects in asymmetric division lead to aberrant cell fate decisions that cause the paradigm mixed lineage phenotypes and the intra-tumoral heterogeneity present across tumors.
    To study interactions of tumor cells and the immune system, we have developed and utilized transplantable mouse glioma models. We are tasked to facilitate and coordinate the distribution of fresh tissue from the neurosurgery operating room, and have access to fresh brain tissue from patient surgeries, from which we prepare cell culture models for brain tumors and normal progenitors. We complement our work with human cells with studies in genetically engineered mouse models of gliomagenesis to conduct molecular, cellular and bioinformatic analyses

  • Giles W Plant

    Giles W Plant

    Associate Professor of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research focuses on the repair of the injured spinal cord. We investigate the following areas:
    - Spinal cord injury (SCI): Axonal regeneration, myelination and gene therapy
    - Stem cell transplantation (adult, embryonic and iPS)
    - Endogenous stem cell activity after SCI

  • Kathleen Poston, MD, MS

    Kathleen Poston, MD, MS

    Associate Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery, at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interests include the development, validation and application of functional and structural Neuroimaging techniques to be used as biomarkers for the diagnosis and treatment of movement disorders, such as Parkinson’s disease.

  • Jennifer Lauren Quon

    Jennifer Lauren Quon

    Affiliate, Dean's Office Operations - Dean Other

    Bio Jennifer was born and raised in New York and received her undergraduate degree in neuroscience from New York University. Her interest in the neurosciences continued as she completed medical school at Yale School of Medicine. During medical school she spent a year as a Howard Hughes Medical Institute research fellow working on an induced pluripotent stem cell model for congenital brain malformations. Jennifer has a particular interest in improving the quality and effectiveness of patient care, especially for pediatric neurosurgical patients. Under Dr. Kristen Yeom?s group at Stanford, Jennifer is using machine learning to develop automated intraoperative navigation and to improve patient outcomes. Outside of neurosurgery, Jennifer enjoys traveling, trying new food, and spending time with friends and family.

  • John Ratliff, MD, FACS

    John Ratliff, MD, FACS

    Professor of Neurosurgery and, by courtesy, of Orthopaedic Surgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interests focus upon preventing complications in spine surgery, assessing patient outcomes after spine surgery procedures, and developing population-based metrics for assessing surgical outcomes.

  • Lawrence Recht, MD

    Lawrence Recht, MD

    Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory focuses on two interrelated projects: (1) assessment of glioma development within the framework of the multistage model of carcinogenesis through utilization of the rodent model of ENU neurocarcinogenesis; and (2) assessment of stem cell specification and pluripotency using an embryonic stem cell model system in which neural differentiation is induced.

  • Nidhi Rohatgi, MD MS

    Nidhi Rohatgi, MD MS

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests - Quality improvement in Perioperative Medicine
    - Standardizing patient care for safer/effective management

  • Sarada Sakamuri, MD

    Sarada Sakamuri, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. Sarada Sakamuri specializes in neuromuscular medicine. Her interests are in peripheral nerve injury, neuromuscular ultrasound, EMG/NCS, neurogenetic disorders, clinical research, and medical education.

    Dr. Sakamuri studied psychology at Rutgers University and she graduated with Phi Beta Kappa distinction. She obtained her medical degree from Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, where she lead multiple community service and medical education activities and was elected to the Alpha Omega Alpha and Gold Humanism Honor Societies. She moved to the Bay Area to pursue neurology residency at Stanford and later served as chief resident. She then completed two years of fellowship in EMG/Clinical Neurophysiology and Neuromuscular Medicine and research training at Forbes Norris MDA/ALS Research Center.

    She serves as the Co-Director of the Center for Peripheral Nerve Surgery along with neurosurgeon Dr. Thomas J. Wilson. She performs advanced evaluations of peripheral nerve conditions by integrating nerve and muscle ultrasound and neurophysiologic testing (EMG/NCS) at the bedside. She has advanced training and particular interest in ultrasound, and sits on the Neuromuscular Ultrasound Committee of the American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine (AANEM).

    She is board-certified in Neurology and Neuromuscular disorders by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology (ABPN). She is certified in EMG/NCS by the American Board of Electrodiagnostic Medicine (ABEM).

    Dr. Sakamuri's other passion is medical education. She is the Associate Director of the Stanford Neuromuscular Medicine and Clinical Neurophysiology/EMG Fellowships. She supervises a weekly neurology resident continuity clinic and enjoys leading teaching sessions for neurology and physiatrist residents and medical students. She has also served as a clinical instructor at Jagiellonian University Medical College in Poland, and as a teaching fellow at Stanford School of Medicine.

  • Cynthia Harryman Samos

    Cynthia Harryman Samos

    CIRM Project Manager, Neurosurgery

    Current Role at Stanford Project Manager and Writer/Editor for the Department of Neurosurgery

  • Robert Sapolsky

    Robert Sapolsky

    John A. and Cynthia Fry Gunn Professor and Professor of Neurology and of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Neuron death, stress, gene therapy

  • Neil Schwartz, MD, PhD

    Neil Schwartz, MD, PhD

    Clinical Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My clinical interests involve inpatient and outpatient care of patients with neurovascular diseases, mostly ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. I have a particular interest in cervical artery dissection, non-atherosclerotic vasculopathies, and stroke in the young.

  • Mehrdad Shamloo

    Mehrdad Shamloo

    Professor (Research) of Neurosurgery and, by courtesy, of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The ultimate goal of the Shamloo laboratory is to rapidly advance our understanding of brain function at the molecular, cellular, circuit and behavioral levels, and to elucidate the pathological process underlying malfunction of the nervous system following injury and neurologic disorders such as stroke, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson?s disease, and autism. We have been focusing on the noradrenergic system and approaches leading to restoration of brain adrenergic signaling in these disorders.

  • Rajat S. Shivacharan

    Rajat S. Shivacharan

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Neurosurgery

    Bio Rajat S. Shivacharan, Ph.D. is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Department of Neurosurgery sponsored by Dr. Casey H. Halpern (Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery). He received his B.S. in Bioengineering from the University of Maryland in 2013. He went on to earn his Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering at Case Western Reserve University in May 2019 in the laboratory of Dr. Dominique M. Durand (Director of Neural Engineering Center), studying the role of endogenous electric fields, or ephaptic coupling, in the recruitment of self-propagating, non-synaptic hippocampal waves under pathophysiological conditions. Now, he investigates the role of neuromodulation for neuropsychiatric indications, specifically mechanistic neurophysiology and closed-loop (or responsive) deep brain stimulation (DBS), to improve current neuromodulation therapies for mental disorders with loss of control. Outside of the lab, Rajat likes to cook (or attempt to cook) different types of cuisine, play video games, and enjoys exploring the beautiful Bay Area through biking, hiking, and camping/offroading with his Jeep.

  • Lawrence Shuer, MD

    Lawrence Shuer, MD

    Professor of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I have clinical research interests in the surgical treatment of epilepsy. I am also interested in new developments in the treatment of craniosynostosis a congenital abnormality of infant's skulls

  • Gerald Silverberg

    Gerald Silverberg

    Professor of Neurosurgery, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Age-related changes in the blood-brain barrier (BBB)and on CSF dynsmics decrease the clearance of toxic metabolites, such as amyloid beta peptides (A-betas), from the brain. I am studing the effects of aging and hydrocephalus on the BBB receptors that transport A-betas and on the formation and bulk flow of CSF.

  • Harminder Singh, M.D.

    Harminder Singh, M.D.

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Minimally Invasive Cranial and Spinal Surgery, Endoscopic Keyhole Surgery

  • Stephen Skirboll

    Stephen Skirboll

    Associate Professor of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research focuses on screening strategies to identify and characterize cancer stem cells (CSCs) in human gliomas. We are pursuing this in several ways: 1) a novel colony-forming antibody live cell array to identify distinct CSC surface phenotypes, 2) RNAi screens to identify kinases critical for CSC tumorigenicity, 3) high throughput small molecule and chemical screens to identify compounds that selectively kill or target CSCs, and 4) identifying CSCs using the tumor specific EGFRvIII

  • Ivan Soltesz

    Ivan Soltesz

    James R. Doty Professor of Neurosurgery and Neurosciences

    Bio Ivan Soltesz received his doctorate in Budapest and conducted postdoctoral research at universities at Oxford, London, Stanford and Dallas. He established his laboratory at the University of California, Irvine, in 1995. He became full Professor in 2003, and served as department Chair from 2006 to July 2015. He returned to Stanford in 2015 as the James R. Doty Professor of Neurosurgery and Neurosciences at Stanford University School of Medicine. His major research interest is focused on neuronal microcircuits, network oscillations, cannabinoid signaling and the mechanistic bases of circuit dysfunction in epilepsy.
    His laboratory employs a combination of closely integrated experimental and theoretical techniques, including closed-loop in vivo optogenetics, paired patch clamp recordings, in vivo electrophysiological recordings from identified interneurons in awake mice, 2-photon imaging, machine learning-aided 3D video analysis of behavior, video-EEG recordings, behavioral approaches, and large-scale computational modeling methods using supercomputers. He is the author of a book on GABAergic microcircuits (Diversity in the Neuronal Machine, Oxford University Press), and editor of a book on Computational Neuroscience in Epilepsy (Academic Press/Elsevier). He co-founded the first Gordon Research Conference on the Mechanisms of neuronal synchronization and epilepsy, and taught for five years in the Ion Channels Course at Cold Springs Harbor. He has over 30 years of research experience, with over 20 years as a faculty involved in the training of graduate students (total of 16, 6 of them MD/PhDs) and postdoctoral fellows (20), many of whom received fellowship awards, K99 grants, joined prestigious residency programs and became independent faculty.

  • Scott G. Soltys, MD

    Scott G. Soltys, MD

    Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Therapy) and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My clinical and research interests focus on the development of new radiation techniques involving stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy for the treatment of malignant and benign tumors of the brain and spine, as well as functional disorders such as trigeminal neuralgia.

Footer Links:

Stanford Medicine Resources: