School of Medicine


Showing 101-134 of 134 Results

  • Thomas Robinson

    Thomas Robinson

    The Irving Schulman, M.D. Endowed Professor in Child Health, Professor of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research Center) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Robinson originated the solution-oriented research paradigm and directs the Stanford Solutions Science Lab. He is known for his pioneering obesity prevention and treatment research, including the concept of stealth interventions. His research applies social cognitive models of behavior change to behavioral, social, environmental and policy interventions for children and families in real world settings, making the results relevant for informing clinical and public health practice and policy.

  • Lisa Goldman Rosas

    Lisa Goldman Rosas

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology) and of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health)

    Bio Lisa Goldman Rosas, PhD MPH is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Population Health and the Department of Medicine, Division of Primary Care and Population Health at Stanford School of Medicine. An epidemiologist by training, Dr. Goldman Rosas? research focuses on addressing disparities in chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, depression, and cancer among racial/ethnic minority families. This research features rigorous quantitative and qualitative methodologies, participatory qualitative approaches, and shared leadership with patient and community partners. She is passionate about integrating patients, caregivers, community organizations, and other key stakeholders in the research process in order to affect the greatest improvements in health and well-being. As a reflection of this passion, Dr. Goldman Rosas serves as the Faculty Director for the School of Medicine Office of Community Engagement and the Stanford Cancer Institute Community Outreach and Engagement Program. In these roles, she supports other faculty and patient and community partners to develop sustainable and meaningful partnerships to support transformative research. In addition to research, she teaches at the undergraduate and graduate levels and has a special focus on increasing diversity in biomedical research.

  • Maya Rossin-Slater

    Maya Rossin-Slater

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Health Services Research)

    Bio Maya Rossin-Slater is an Assistant Professor of Health Research and Policy at Stanford University School of Medicine. She is also a Faculty Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic and Policy Research (SIEPR), a Faculty Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) and a Research Affiliate at the Institute of Labor Economics (IZA). She received her Ph.D. in Economics from Columbia University in 2013, and was an Assistant Professor of Economics at the University of California, Santa Barbara from 2013 to 2017, prior to coming to Stanford. Rossin-Slater?s research includes work in health, public, and labor economics. She focuses on issues in maternal and child well-being, family structure and behavior, and policies targeting disadvantaged populations in the United States and other developed countries. She is the recipient of the National Science Foundation CAREER Award, and has published articles in a variety of peer-reviewed journals, including the American Economic Review, Journal of Political Economy, American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, Journal of Health Economics, Journal of Public Economics, and Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

  • Kristin Sainani (n e Cobb)

    Kristin Sainani (n e Cobb)

    Associate Professor (Teaching) of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Science writing, science communication, biostatistics. Research areas: osteoporosis, stress fractures, sports injuries, female athlete triad.

  • Joshua Salomon

    Joshua Salomon

    Professor of Medicine (Primary Care and Outcomes Research), Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and Professor, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Health Services Research)

    Bio Joshua Salomon is a Professor of Medicine and a core faculty member in the Center for Health Policy and the Center for Primary Care and Outcomes Research. His research focuses on priority-setting in global health, within three main substantive areas: (1) measurement and valuation of health outcomes; (2) modeling patterns and trends in major causes of global mortality and disease burden; and (3) evaluation of health interventions and policies.

    Dr. Salomon is an investigator on projects funded by the Centers for Disease Control, National Institutes of Health and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, relating to modeling of infectious and chronic diseases and associated intervention strategies; methods for economic evaluation of public health programs; measurement of the global burden of disease; and assessment of the potential impact and cost effectiveness of new health technologies.

    He is Director of the Prevention Policy Modeling Lab, which is a multi-institution research consortium that conducts health and economic modeling relating to infectious disease. Prior to joining the Stanford faculty, Dr. Salomon was Professor of Global Health at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

  • Lee Sanders

    Lee Sanders

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (General Pediatrics) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I conduct interdisciplinary research to understand child and parent health literacy as potentially modifiable determinants of child health disparities. I am principal investigator on an multi-site, randomized controlled trial to assess the efficacy of a low-literacy, early-childhood intervention designed to prevent obesity in the first two years of life. The aim of my current scholarship is to apply the health-literacy model to attenuate disparities for children with chronic illness.

  • Stylianos Serghiou

    Stylianos Serghiou

    Ph.D. Student in Epidemiology and Clinical Research, admitted Autumn 2016

    Bio Stylianos (Stelios) Serghiou joined the PhD program in Epidemiology and Clinical Research in 2016. After spending two years as a second lieutenant for the National Guard of Cyprus, he attended the University of Edinburgh, where he obtained a BSc with Honors in Neuroscience in 2012 and received his medical degree (MBChB) with Honors in 2015. He was then awarded a post and worked for a year as an Academic Foundation Doctor for NHS Lothian and as an Honorary Clinical Fellow of the University of Edinburgh. Over his time in Edinburgh, he obtained multiple awards, including scholarships by the Royal College of Physicians of UK and Ireland, Royal College of Ophthalmologists and being an AMGEN scholar. He is moving to Stanford to work on his interests in improving the quality of medical research and exploring the application of novel computational techniques to analyzing big data in medicine. Alongside medicine, he is especially interested in music and had served as the leader of the National Youth Orchestra of Cyprus and a first violin of the University of Edinburgh Symphony Orchestra.

  • Gary M. Shaw

    Gary M. Shaw

    NICU Nurses Professor and Professor (Research), by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology) and of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Maternal Fetal Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Primary research interests include 1) epidemiology of birth defects, 2) gene-environment approaches to perinatal outcomes, and 3) nutrition and reproductive outcomes.

  • Julia Simard

    Julia Simard

    Assistant Professor of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology) and, by courtesy, of Medicine (Immunology & Rheumatology)

    Bio Julia Fridman Simard, ScD, is an Assistant Professor of Epidemiology & Population Health, and, by courtesy, of Medicine in Immunology and Rheumatology at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Simard earned her Masters and Doctorate of Science in Epidemiology degrees at the Harvard School of Public Health. During that time she trained with investigators at the Section of Clinical Sciences, Division of Rheumatology, Immunology, and Allergy at Brigham and Women?s Hospital and the Cardiovascular Epidemiology Research Unit at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. In 2008, Dr. Simard relocated to Sweden to begin a Postdoctoral Fellowship in Clinical Epidemiology at the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm. She became an Assistant Professor in their Clinical Epidemiology Unit in 2011, and was later honored with a Karolinska Institutet Teaching Award. Leveraging the population-based registers of Sweden, Dr. Simard initiated a national register linkage study to examine the utility of registers in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) research and develop an extensive data repository for future epidemiologic investigations.

    While maintaining a close collaboration with the Karolinska Institutet, she joined Stanford?s Epidemiology faculty as an Assistant Professor in 2013. Dr. Simard studies outcomes such as malignancy, stroke, infection, and mortality, in patients with systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases, but her primary research focus has shifted to the intersection between reproductive epidemiology and rheumatic disease. In 2014 she was awarded a five-year K career development award from the NIH (NIAMS) to study maternal and fetal outcomes in systemic lupus pregnancy. This fueled a number of collaborations with colleagues at Stanford, throughout the US, and abroad, and a series of projects focused on the diagnosis of preeclampsia and associated risks in pregnant women with systemic lupus. Dr. Simard was recently awarded a Peter Joseph Pappas Research Grant from the Preeclampsia Foundation for her lab's work examining preeclampsia risk in high-risk populations, and a McCormick Faculty Award from Stanford Medicine to take important steps towards disentangling preeclampsia from lupus nephritis. In addition to these issues of misclassification in reproductive rheumatology questions, Dr. Simard's lab is also interested in how misclassification, missed opportunities, and misdiagnosis contribute to disparities in complex conditions such as SLE. In addition to methodologic issues around misclassification and bias and the largely clinical epi focus of her work, Dr. Simard's work examines social determinants of health and health disparities.

  • Marcia L. Stefanick, Ph.D.

    Marcia L. Stefanick, Ph.D.

    Professor (Research) of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research Center), of Obstetrics and Gynecology and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Marcia Stefanick, Ph.D a Professor of Medicine at the Stanford Prevention Research Center, (SPRC) and Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Stanford University School of Medicine.
    Dr. Stefanick's research focuses on chronic disease prevention (particularly, heart disease, breast cancer, osteoporosis, and dementia) in both women and men. Her work on the effects of menopausal hormones on cardiovascular and other health outcomes in mostly healthy postmenopausal women (in the Women's Health Initiative, WHI), in women with established heart disease, (the Heart and Estrogen-progesterone Replacement Study, HERS), and in peri-menopausal and early post-menopausal women (the Postmenopausal Estrogen and Progesterone Interventions, PEPI) trials has been widely disseminated both nationally and internationally. She was also the principal investigator of two large diet trials focusing on the role of a low-fat eating pattern (including increased vegetables & fruits) on preventing breast cancer (WHI) and recurrence (Women's Healthy Eating and Living, WHEL, trial) and she conducted several medium-sized diet, exercise, and weight control trials focused on heart disease risk and body composition that have influenced national guidelines. [She is currently writing a proposal for a large national trial of physical activity in older women with cardiovascular outcomes, not just risk factors.] Her current passion is the study of Sex (and Gender) Differences in Human Physiology and Disease, the title of a course she teaches in Stanford's Human Biology program, in addition to a course entitled: Current Topics and Controversies in Women's Health. Dr. Stefanick also plays major leadership roles in Stanford's Cardiovascular Institutes Women's Heart Health Program and Stanford Cancer Institutes Cancer Prevention and Control Program.
    Dr. Stefanick obtained her B.A. in biology from the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (1974), then pursued her interest in hormone and sex difference research at the Oregon Regional Primate Research Center, after which she obtained her PhD in Physiology at Stanford University, focusing on reproductive physiology and neuroendocrinology with exercise physiology as a secondary focus. Her commitment to human research directed her to a post-doctoral fellowship in Cardiovascular Disease Prevention at SPRC, which has been her academic home for nearly 30 years.

  • Eric Sun

    Eric Sun

    Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine (Adult-MSD) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Health Services Research) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research examines questions of health economics and health policy, with a focus on economics and policy in the perioperative setting. Current research topics include the economics of treatments for chronic pain, as well as how physician practice organization affects outcomes and costs.

  • Holly Tabor

    Holly Tabor

    Associate Professor of Medicine (General Medical Disciplines) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research focuses on ethical issues in genetics and genomics, specifically return of results and translation for exome and whole genome sequencing and translation of genomic sequencing into the clinical setting. I also conduct research on ethical issues in clinical care and research for patients and families with autism and other developmental and cognitive disabilities.

  • (Nicholas) Kenji Taylor

    (Nicholas) Kenji Taylor

    Instructor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Bio Dr. Taylor was born and raised in rural Kansas and Pennsylvania, the youngest of four children. He headed to the big city of Providence, RI to study Neuroscience, East Asian Studies and Entrepreneurship at Brown University. Following graduation, his short-lived career in finance took him to Los Angeles, London and Tokyo, before he decided medicine was how he could directly help others who needed it the most. He attended the University of Pennsylvania where he developed a passion for health disparities, social justice and community medicine in West Philadelphia. As a medical student, he founded the nationally-recognized Cut Hypertension Program (www.cuthypertension.org), a blood pressure screening, education and referral program partnered with African American barbershops. He completed residency and chief residency at UCSF prior to joining the Stanford faculty and Stanford-Intermountain Fellowship in Population Health, Delivery Science, and Primary Care.

    Dr. Taylor is a family physician, researcher, implementer, activist and educator. He is excited about the potential for innovative care models, financing and technology to improve the health of underserved populations. He is also interested in HIV primary care, mentoring black men of color in medicine and medical education in community clinics. In addition to his primary care practice at Stanford Family Medicine, Dr. Taylor provides HIV, MAT and Hep C treatment at the Roots Community Health Center in East Oakland where he also leads the community health navigator program for complex care patients.

    For fulfillment outside of medicine, he loves being a new dad, plays the violin, travels, spends time outdoors and enjoys cooking with friends and family.

    For more information on The Cut Hypertension Program, please visit www.cuthypertension.org; IG - @cuthypertensionprogram; FB ? The Cut Hypertension Program

  • Christophe Toukam Tchakoute

    Christophe Toukam Tchakoute

    Ph.D. Student in Epidemiology and Clinical Research, admitted Autumn 2016

    Bio I am a PhD candidate with interests in HIV/AIDS and causal inference. I am interested in novel statistical techniques aiming to improve transportability of average treatment effects across different populations/environments.

  • Stacie Vilendrer

    Stacie Vilendrer

    Clinical Instructor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Bio Experienced physician with a focus on healthcare delivery innovation. Strong clinical experience in internal medicine, pediatrics, obstetrics, geriatrics, and focused training in integrative/functional medicine & global health. Broad business experience in health technology, medical devices & entrepreneurship. MD from Stanford School of Medicine with concentration in Health Policy and Bioinformatics. MBA from Stanford Graduate School of Business with Certificate in Public Management & Social Innovation.

  • C. Jason Wang, MD, PhD

    C. Jason Wang, MD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (General Pediatrics) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital and of Medicine (PCOR) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Health Services Research)

    Bio Dr. Wang is the Director of Center for Policy, Outcomes and Prevention. Prior to coming to Stanford in 2011, he was a faculty member at Boston University Schools of Medicine and Public Health. His other professional experiences include working as a management consultant with McKinsey and Company and serving as the project manager for Taiwan's National Health Insurance Reform Task-force. His current interests include: 1) developing tools for assessing and improving the value of healthcare; 2) facilitating the use of mobile technology in improving quality of care; 3) supporting competency-based medical education curriculum, and 4) engaging in healthcare reform.

  • Dee W. West

    Dee W. West

    Professor of Health Research and Policy, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests - Cancer etiology (diet, familial, genetic), especially breast, prostate and colon cancer
    - Cancer surveillance (Cancer registration, cancer patterns)
    - Cancer outcomes (Survival, quality of life, quality of care)

  • Alice S Whittemore

    Alice S Whittemore

    Professor of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology) and of Biomedical Data Science, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Cancers of the prostate, breast and ovary account for a major proportion of new cancer cases and cancer deaths in the U.S. each year. Our recent research focus has been on developing improved statistical methods for the design and conduct of studies involving hereditary predisposition and modifiable lifestyle characteristics in the etiologies of site-specific cancers.

  • Erik Wiesehan

    Erik Wiesehan

    Ph.D. Student in Health Policy, admitted Autumn 2019

    Bio Erik is a PhD student in the Department of Health Research and Policy at Stanford University. Since 2006, he has been serving in the United States Army as a commissioned medical services officer, working predominately within its own system for health in the areas of operations, finance, and analytics. His most recently completed assignment was as the Chief Financial Officer for the Fort Knox, KY Medical Activity. His research interests reside in applying economic evaluations, simulations, and modeling to examine the costs and outcomes to the practices, policies, and overall design in health care affecting Maternal and Child Health.

  • Biyao Zou

    Biyao Zou

    Ph.D. Student in Epidemiology and Clinical Research, admitted Autumn 2018

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research has been focusing on the disease and economic burden and risk factors of liver disease in the United States and Asia. Currently, I work on identifying causal risk factors for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and the causal role of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in various diseases including cardiovascular disease and cancer using a genetic epidemiology approach.

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