School of Medicine


Showing 1-37 of 37 Results

  • Soichi Wakatsuki

    Soichi Wakatsuki

    Professor of Photon Science and of Structural Biology

    Bio Soichi Wakatsuki is a Professor of Photon Science at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory where he recently initiated the Biociences Division, and Professor of Structural Biology, Stanford School of Medicine. He received his B.S and M.S. degrees in Chemical Engineering from University of Tokyo, and his Ph.D. degree in Chemistry from Stanford University in 1991. After postdoctoral studies on time-resolved x-ray crystallography of enzyme reactions in Oxford (1990 to 1994), he moved to Grenoble, France in 1994 to work at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) where he led Joint Structural Biology Group to develop high-brilliance x-ray crystallography beamlines and instruments, as well as several structural biology projects on protein transport. In 2000, Soichi moved back to Japan to start a new Structural Biology Research Center at KEK (High Energy Accelerator Research Organization), Tsukuba, Japan, and later served as Director of Photon Factory (national synchrotron radiation facility) from 2006 to 2012. There he further developed x-ray beamlines and a large scale protein crystallization system, led initiatives to start three national projects on structural proteomics. Fascinated by new research opportunities in integrative bioimaging at Stanford and the world?s first hard x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) at SLAC, Soichi returned to Stanford in 2013. Soichi?s research interests include structural biology of post-translational modification and vesicle transport, structural biology of polyubiquitin recognition, synchrotron radiation and XFEL instrumentation, protein crystallography and small angle X-ray scattering, integrative multi-scale bioimaging.

  • Dennis Wall

    Dennis Wall

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Systems Medicine), of Biomedical Data Science and, by courtesy, of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Systems biology for design of clinical solutions that detect and treat disease

  • Brian A. Wandell

    Brian A. Wandell

    Isaac and Madeline Stein Family Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering, of Ophthalmology and at the Graduate School of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Models and measures of the human visual system. The brain pathways essential for reading development. Diffusion tensor imaging, functional magnetic resonance imaging and computational modeling of visual perception and brain processes.

  • C. Jason Wang, MD, PhD

    C. Jason Wang, MD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (General Pediatrics) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital and of Medicine (PCOR) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Health Services Research)

    Bio Dr. Wang is the Director of Center for Policy, Outcomes and Prevention. Prior to coming to Stanford in 2011, he was a faculty member at Boston University Schools of Medicine and Public Health. His other professional experiences include working as a management consultant with McKinsey and Company and serving as the project manager for Taiwan's National Health Insurance Reform Task-force. His current interests include: 1) developing tools for assessing and improving the value of healthcare; 2) facilitating the use of mobile technology in improving quality of care; 3) supporting competency-based medical education curriculum, and 4) engaging in healthcare reform.

  • Kevin Wang, MD, PhD

    Kevin Wang, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Dermatology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Wang lab takes an interdisciplinary approach to studying fundamental mechanisms controlling gene expression in mammalian cells, and how epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation, chromatin modifications, and RNA influence chromatin dynamics to affect gene regulation.

  • Marie Wang

    Marie Wang

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Evaluation and management of the febrile young infant and infections in hospitalized children (eg, UTIs, CNS infections, pneumonia); promotion of appropriate antibiotic use; implementation of clinical pathways.

  • Nancy  Wang

    Nancy Wang

    Professor of Emergency Medicine and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics (Hospital Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests - Disparities in Emergency Medical Services for children.
    - Efficacy of novel interventions for pediatric access to care.
    - Teaching and supporting community-initiated interventions and programs internationally.

  • Paul  J. Wang, MD

    Paul J. Wang, MD

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center and, by courtesy, of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Wang's research centers on the development of innovative approaches to the treatment of arrhythmias, including more effective catheter ablation techniques, more reliable implantable devices, and less invasive treatments. Dr. Wang's clinical research interests include atrial fibrillation, ventricular tachycardia, syncope, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Dr. Wang has active collaborations with Bioengineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Electrical Engineering Departments at Stanford.

  • ShanáX. Wang

    ShanáX. Wang

    Leland T. Edwards Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Electrical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Wang is the Director of Stanford Center for Magnetic Nanotechnology, and the Co-PI of the Stanford Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence. His research interests lie in nanotechnology and information storage, including magnetic/spintronic biochips, in vitro diagnostics, cell sorting, magnetic nanoparticles, nano-patterning, spin electronic materials and sensors, as well as magnetic integrated inductors and transformers.

  • Wang,Taia

    Wang,Taia

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Studies in our lab are aimed at defining mechanisms in human immunity and disease. We are particularly interested the hypothesis that IgG repertoire diversity is a central driver of heterogeneity in human immune functioning and susceptibility to infectious diseases. Our work is defining how diversity that exists in the IgG Fc domain repertoire among people, which we define by serum IgG subclass and Fc glycoform distributions, impacts immune processes such as vaccine responses and susceptibility to antibody-dependent enhancement of dengue disease (Wang TT, Cell. 2015 and Wang TT, Science. 2017). IgG subclass and Fc glycoform distributions are key regulators of immunity because these determine the structure of Fc domains within immune complexes that form during vaccination or infection. Fc structure, in turn, determines the affinity of immune complexes for various Fc receptors on effector cells. Thus, we are studying how the Fc domain repertoire of an individual impacts the quality of effector cell responses that can be recruited during immune activation and how selectivity of effector responses contributes to immunity and disease.

    We are particularly interested in training students and postdocs who will go on to be independent investigators in mechanistic studies relevant to human disease.


    Current clinical studies:
    Recruiting:

    An Open Label Study of IgG Fc Glycan Composition in Human Immunity
    Principal Investigator: Taia T. Wang, MD, PhD
    ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
    NCT01967238

  • Weinacht,Katja Gabriele

    Weinacht,Katja Gabriele

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Stem Cell Transplantation and Regenerative Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation
    DiGeorge Syndrome
    Genetic Immune Diseases
    Immune Dysregulation

  • Dana Weintraub

    Dana Weintraub

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - General Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Research interests include: 1) Childhood obesity, community-based interventions to increase physical activity 2) Impact of medical-legal collaboration on child and family health.

  • Irving Weissman

    Irving Weissman

    Director, Stanford Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Virginia & D.K. Ludwig Professor for Clinical Investigation in Cancer Research, Professor of Developmental Biology and, by courtesy, of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Stem cell and cancer stem cell biology; development of T and B lymphocytes; cell-surface receptors for oncornaviruses in leukemia. Hematopoietic stem cells; Lymphocyte homing, lymphoma invasiveness and metastasis.

  • Marius Wernig

    Marius Wernig

    Professor of Pathology and, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Epigenetic Reprogramming, Direct conversion of fibroblasts into neurons, Pluripotent Stem Cells, Neural Differentiation: implications in development and regenerative medicine

  • MatthewáWheeler

    MatthewáWheeler

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Translational research in rare and undiagnosed diseases. Basic and clinical research in cardiomyopathy genetics, mechanisms, screening, and treatment. Investigating novel agents for treatment of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and new mechanisms in heart failure. Cardiovascular screening and genetics in competitive athletes, disease gene discovery in cardiomyopathy and rare disease. Informatics approaches to rare disease and multiomics. Molecular transducers of physical activity bioinformatics.

  • Darrell Wilson

    Darrell Wilson

    Professor of Pediatrics (Endocrinology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interests cover a number of areas in Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes. I am PI of the Stanford Center for the NIH-funded Type-1 Diabetes TrialNet group. TrialNet conducts clinical trials directed at preventing or delaying the onset of Type 1 diabetes. I am an investigator in DirecNet, another NIH-funded study group, which is devoted to evaluating glucose sensors and the role of technology on the management of diabetes.

  • Helen Wilson

    Helen Wilson

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Wilson is a licensed clinical psychologist with expertise on the effects of trauma across the lifespan. She provides clinical services for children, adolescents, adults, and families affected by trauma and other forms of anxiety and stress. Dr. Wilson also leads an active research program focused on relationships between childhood trauma and health risk behavior in adolescence and adulthood. She is the Principal Investigator of GIRLTALK: We Talk, a longitudinal study funded by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) that examines links from childhood violence exposure to dating violence and sexual risk in young women from low-income communities in Chicago. Dr. Wilson has authored or co-authored thirty journal articles and book chapters related to these topics, and she regularly presents her work at local and national conferences. She is on the editorial board of the Journal of Youth and Adolescence.

  • Jeffrey J. Wine

    Jeffrey J. Wine

    Benjamin Scott Crocker Professor of Human Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The goal is to understand how a defective ion channel leads to the human genetic disease cystic fibrosis. Studies of ion channels and ion transport involved in gland fluid transport. Methods include SSCP mutation detection and DNA sequencing, protein analysis, patch-clamp recording, ion-selective microelectrodes, electrophysiological analyses of transmembrane ion flows, isotopic metho

  • Terry Winograd

    Terry Winograd

    Professor of Computer Science, Emeritus

    Bio Professor Winograd's focus is on human-computer interaction design and the design of technologies for development. He directs the teaching programs and HCI research in the Stanford Human-Computer Interaction Group, which recently celebrated it's 20th anniversary. He is also a founding faculty member of the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design at Stanford (the "d.school") and on the faculty of the Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law (CDDRL)

    Winograd was a founding member and past president of Computer Professionals for Social Responsibility. He is on a number of journal editorial boards, including Human Computer Interaction, ACM Transactions on Computer Human Interaction, and Informatica. He has advised a number of companies started by his students, including Google. In 2011 he received the ACM SIGCHI Lifetime Research Award.

  • Paul H. Wise, MD, MPH

    Paul H. Wise, MD, MPH

    Richard E. Behrman Professor in Child Health

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests He is a health policy and outcomes researcher whose work has focused on children's health; health-outcomes disparities by race, ethnicity and socioeconomic status; the interaction of genetics and the environment as these factors influence child and maternal health; and the impact of medical technology on disparities in health outcomes.

  • WingáHung Wong

    WingáHung Wong

    Stephen R. Pierce Family Goldman Sachs Professor in Science and Human Health and Professor of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Current interest centers on the application of statistics to biology and medicine. We are particularly interested in questions concerning gene regulation, genome interpretation and their applications to precision medicine.

  • Albert Y. Wu, MD, PhD, FACS

    Albert Y. Wu, MD, PhD, FACS

    Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My translational research focuses on using autologous stem cells to recreate a patient?s ocular tissues for potential transplantation. We are generating tissue from induced pluripotent stem cells to treat limbal stem cell deficiency in patients who are bilaterally blind. By applying my background in molecular and cellular biology, stem cell biology, oculoplastic surgery, I hope to make regenerative medicine a reality for those suffering from orbital and ocular disease.

  • Chien Ting Wu

    Chien Ting Wu

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Microbiology and Immunology

    Bio I started conducting research as a second-year student in college. I entered a biochemical lab to perform research and had my own project. My topic was Alzheimer's disease, and I focused on the relationship between aggregated amyloid-beta and reactive oxygen species levels in cells. I am very grateful for this particular research experience because it allowed me to realize that I am particularly interested in studying disease-associated proteins on a molecular level. Thus, these early research experiences have been invaluable in shaping my scientific interests and personality.

    I decided to pursue my graduate training straight out of college by obtaining my master?s degree. I then decided to join the Chen, I-T. Lab for my graduate research training, where I discovered that a novel recombinant protein, LZ8 cloned from Ganoderma, can inhibit the duplication of cancer cells in vitro and decrease the growth rate of tumors in vivo through regulating the p53/MDM2/mTOR signaling pathway. My findings were published in the journal Carcinogenesis. This was my first first-author paper. During this time, I learned how to become an independent scientist.

    After my master?s degree, I spent three years completing my military service as a research assistant in Academia Sinica. I worked under the supervision of Prof. Tang Tang. My research focused on the molecular mechanism of centriole duplication. In my research, I found that CEP120, a ciliopathy protein, is required to promote centriole elongation. Overexpression of CEP120 can induce overly long centrioles. This work was published in the Journal of Cell Biology. This was my second first-author paper. Because of these valuable lab experiences, I began to be fascinated by the centriole and cilium field.

    Afterwards, to better understand centriole- and cilia-related human hereditary diseases, I worked as a molecular diagnostician in a molecular diagnosis lab at Oregon Health Science University. I used next-generation sequencing (NGS) to identify gene mutations from ciliopathy patients. During this period, I learned how to run a complete molecular diagnosis, draw blood for running NGS, analyzing patient data, preparing patient reports and designing a novel disease panel to run NGS. This experience provided me with a new perspective and connected the things that I learned in the centriole and cilia field, from biochemistry to molecular biology to clinical diagnosis. Most importantly, this experience allowed me to realize that so many people suffer from ciliopathy disease. As a researcher, I hope to continue my research on the cilium field to help develop better clinical treatments for these patients.

    For this reason, I decided to join the Tang Tang Lab in Academia Sinica for my PhD training. The Tang Lab has a longstanding interest in understanding the mechanisms of centriole duplication and is at the forefront of research in the primary cilium field. In this period, I found that Myosin-Va, a motor protein, is required for preciliary vesicle trafficking during the early stage of ciliogenesis. This research was published in Nature Cell Biology.
    Thus, my experiences have allowed me to develop my scientific interests and to realize that I would one day like to run my own laboratory and research program focusing on cilium-related diseases.

  • Hsi-Yang Wu

    Hsi-Yang Wu

    Associate Professor of Urology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am interested in how the brain matures to control the bladder and external sphincter to achieve urinary continence. Using functional MRI of the brain, we are investigating if certain patterns of activity will predict which children will respond to therapy for incontinence.

  • Joseph  C. Wu

    Joseph C. Wu

    Director, Stanford Cardiovascular Institute, Simon H. Stertzer, MD, Professor and Professor of Radiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Drug discovery, drug screening, and disease modeling using biobank of cardiac iPSC lines.

  • Joy Wu

    Joy Wu

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My laboratory focuses on the pathways that regulate the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into the osteoblast and adipocyte lineages. We are also studying the role of osteoblasts in the hematopoietic and cancer niches in the bone marrow microenvironment.

  • Sean M. Wu

    Sean M. Wu

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My lab seeks to identify mechanisms regulating cardiac lineage commitment during embryonic development and the biology of cardiac progenitor cells in development and disease. We believe that by understanding the transcriptional and epigenetic basis of cardiomyocyte growth and differentiation, we can identify the most effective ways to repair diseased adult hearts. We employ mouse and human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells as well as rodents as our in vivo models for investigation.

  • Courtney Wusthoff, MD

    Courtney Wusthoff, MD

    Associate Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics (Neonatology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My projects focus on clinical research in newborns with, or at risk, for brain injury. I use EEG in at-risk neonates to better understand the underlying pathophysiology of risk factors that may lead to worse outcomes. I am particularly interested in neonatal seizures and how they may exacerbate perinatal brain injury with a goal to identify treatments that might protect the vulnerable brain. I am also interested in EEG in other pediatric populations, as well as medical ethics and global health.

  • TonyáWyss-Coray, PhD

    TonyáWyss-Coray, PhD

    D. H. Chen Professor II

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Use of genetic and molecular tools to dissect immune and inflammatory pathways in Alzheimer's and neurodegeneration.

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