School of Medicine


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  • Kimberly Sue Stone, MD

    Kimberly Sue Stone, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Surgery - General Surgery

    Bio Kimberly Stone, MD is a board certified General Surgeon who specializes in breast surgical oncology and melanoma surgery. She treats all conditions related to breast health including: breast cancer, high risk prevention and screening, benign breast disease, and conditions related to lactation.

    Dr. Stone completed a breast surgical oncology fellowship at UCSF, where she trained in all aspects of breast surgical oncology, and melanoma surgery. Dr Stone performs all types of breast surgery including total skin and nipple sparing mastectomy, wireless lumpectomy, benign breast disease excisions and axillary surgery. She works closely with plastic and reconstructive surgeons to offer women the best possible cosmetic options and results following treatment. Dr Stone performs melanoma surgery including wide local excision, sentinel lymph node biopsy, and lymph node dissections for melanoma.

    Dr. Stone strives to deliver compassionate, patient-centered surgical care that is expert and evidence-based while at the same time customized to the unique needs of each patient. She believes that patient empowerment and education are at the heart of an excellent care team.

  • Ga Young Suh

    Ga Young Suh

    Adjunct Professor, Surgery - Vascular Surgery

    Bio After completion of MS/PhD from Mechanical Engineering, I've been with Division of Vascular Surgery at Stanford since 2011. I am motivated to apply Engineering-based techniques to patient anatomy or medical device. Also, I am actively teaching and training undergrad students, medical school students and trainees.

  • Karl Sylvester

    Karl Sylvester

    Professor of Surgery (Pediatric Surgery) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests One of the current primary interests of the lab is to investigate the mechanisms by which hepatocellular injury and recovery is influenced and controlled by hepatocyte metabolism.

    A second focus of investigation is to identify molecular markers of human disease that provide diagnostic function, serve as targets for possible therapeutic manipulation, or provide insight into mechanisms of human disease. Specific diseases of interest include newborn sepsis and Necrotizing Enterocolitis (NEC).

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