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  • David E. Oji

    David E. Oji

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Orthopaedic Surgery

    Bio Dr. David Oji is a board certified and fellowship trained orthopaedic surgeon specializing in the operative and non-operative treatment of all aspects of foot and ankle disorders. After finishing his orthopaedic surgery residency at The Johns Hopkins Hospital, he did his fellowship at Union Memorial Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland under the leadership of Dr. Lew Schon, the former president of the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society. There he underwent advanced training in the forefront of foot and ankle surgery including total ankle replacements, use of stem cells to promote healing of acute and chronic conditions, non-fusion techniques of great toe arthritis, and complex ankle and foot reconstruction.

    During his training, he assisted in treating the Baltimore Orioles and amateur ballet dancers. Dr. Oji also took part in conducting advanced biomechanical and clinical research and has written chapters in textbooks with topics ranging from arthroscopic treatment of talar cartilage defects to the diabetic foot.

    After fellowship, he was in private practice working closely with the community as the team physicians for many of the local high school sports teams.

    In June of 2017, Dr. Oji joined the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Stanford University School of Medicine as a Clinical Assistant Professor. In addition to his usual clinical and educational responsibilities, he is also one of the team physicians for Stanford University Athletic programs.

    Since starting at Stanford, he has been on the forefront of ankle and foot surgery. He has performed the first out patient total ankle replacement and the first total talar replacement at Stanford. He is an advocate of minimally invasive ankle and foot surgery performing one of the first MIS (minimally invasive surgery) bunion surgeries in the Bay Area. Whenever possible, the smallest incision and the least invasive approach will be done to allow the patient to heal faster including tendosopy, small joint arthroscopy, endoscopic Haglund's resection, minimally invasive osteotomy, and minimally invasive great toe cheilectomy.

    He has a special focus in the treatment of ankle and foot orthopaedic sports injuries such as chronic ankle instability, cartilage injuries, Achilles injuries, using surgery only as a last resort to return the patient to peak athletic form.

    In addition, he has extensive experience in complex ankle and foot reconstruction such as ankle replacements, flatfeet reconstruction, fusions of the foot and hindfoot, and Charcot foot/ankle reconstruction.

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