School of Medicine


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  • Nick Hakes

    Nick Hakes

    Stanford Student Employee, School of Medicine - Biomedical Ethics

    Bio My professional goal is to be a trauma surgeon in the military because I want to serve my country while saving the lives of American heroes wounded in the fight for freedom.

    Trauma is my passion. Whether I am in the ambulance, helicopter, trauma bay, operating room, or intensive care unit, I am fascinated by emergency medicine and critical care, especially trauma and burns.

    I am constantly seeking opportunities to work, volunteer, shadow, and research. Please feel free to contact me at 330-990-8599 or hakesn@stanford.edu to assist me in my endeavors or simply talk shop.

    When not in scrubs, I enjoy spontaneous adventures, skydiving, water skiing, running, playing soccer, farming sweet corn, hunting, fishing, line dancing, attending the rodeo, and listening to country music.

  • Meghan Halley

    Meghan Halley

    Research Scholar, School of Medicine - Biomedical Ethics

    Bio I am a medical anthropologist with a background in public health and a passion for research that engages the voices of patients and families in improving population health and healthcare delivery. I am a proud Midwesterner, with a B.A. in anthropology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and a PhD and MPH from Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio. My broad research interests include the psychosocial dimensions of health and illness, the well-being of children and families, and medical decision-making, particularly in the context of complex illness. I also am a perpetual student of the art of grant writing, and I love supporting scientists in developing this critical skill. At the Center for Biomedical Ethics, my research examines the ethical and economic implications of genome sequencing for diagnosis of children with rare diseases and their families. My work examines the ethical implications of varying approaches to economic evaluation and their relation to reimbursement and equitable access to new genomic technologies. I am also interested in the development of new tools for measurement of the costs and benefits of new genomic technologies that reflect patient values.

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