School of Medicine


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  • Vali Barsan

    Vali Barsan

    Affiliate, Dean's Office Operations - Dean Other

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Adoptive T cell immunotherapy entails engineering immune cells to recognize cancer-specific antigens and target them for destruction. Barriers to efficacy can arise from both tumor antigen related as well as T cell related features. I am interested developing noninvasive molecular tools that enable us to understanding these relationships to improve the clinical application and development of cellular immunotherapeutics.

  • Patrick DeMoss

    Patrick DeMoss

    Affiliate, Dean's Office Operations - Dean Other

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I work in the Davis Lab trying to characterize the tumor microenvironment of Ewing Sarcoma, with an eventual goal to better understand immune interactions in hopes of improving immunotherapy for these tumors.

    I am also interested in the history of medicine, specifically viewing current diseases through a historical prism, such as reading original accounts of diseases, laboratory results, and study protocols. Medicine is naturally a historical discipline: as knowledge accumulates, so medicine as a field progresses. Furthermore, by studying medicine in a historical context, I believe it enriches our current practice by connecting us with our predecessor physicians.

  • Adrienne H. Long, MD, PhD

    Adrienne H. Long, MD, PhD

    Affiliate, Dean's Office Operations - Dean Other

    Bio Adrienne H. Long, MD, PhD is a fellow in the Division of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology at the Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford. Dr. Long attend Northwestern University, where she earned both her BS in biomedical engineering and her MD. Determined to help develop novel treatments for pediatric cancer patients, she took time during medical school to pursue a PhD at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), where she helped advance CAR T cell therapies with Dr. Crystal Mackall. Her influential thesis work was the first to identify T cell exhaustion as a critical factor limiting efficacy of CAR therapies (Long et al., Nature Medicine, 2015), and also identified novel methods to enhance CAR therapies for pediatric solid tumor patients (Long/Highfill et al., Cancer Immunology Research, 2016). Dr. Long went on to complete her pediatrics residency training at Boston Children?s Hospital, where she continued her research in cancer immunology with Dr. Nicholas Haining ? this time focusing on strategies to enhance antigen presentation to augment checkpoint blockade (Long et al. Keystone Symposium on Cancer Immunotherapy, 2019). She remains dedicated to a career as a physician-scientist focused on developing novel immunotherapies for children with cancer.

  • Raúl Montiel-Esparza

    Raúl Montiel-Esparza

    Affiliate, Dean's Office Operations - Dean Other

    Bio Raúl Montiel-Esparza grew up in central Mexico and graduated with honors from Tecnológico de Monterrey Escuela de Medicina. Raúl completed a postdoctoral research fellowship in cancer immunology at Johns Hopkins University and trained at University of Texas Southwestern medical center for his Pediatrics residency. He has presented his work on leukemia and myelodysplasia several times at national conferences and has several publications and co-authorships. His experiences as a clinician, scientist, and advocate have ultimately inspired him to explore adaptive T-cell therapies in GHVD and decreasing barriers to bone marrow transplant and improving donor availability in Latin America.

  • Agnes Reschke

    Agnes Reschke

    Affiliate, Dean's Office Operations - Dean Other

    Bio Agnes Reschke, MD is a clinical fellow in the Division of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology at the Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, Stanford University School of Medicine. She obtained her bachelor of science and honors from Villanova University and after her family moved to Kentucky, went on to medical school at University of Kentucky College of Medicine. She completed a pediatric residency at Connecticut Children's Medical Center and during that time, focused on a clinical research project evaluating a proposed association between domestic radon levels and the development of sarcoma. Dr. Reschke ultimately came to Lucile Packard Children's Hospital for her pediatric hematology/oncology fellowship and during that time, discovered the emerging field of onco-critical care. Her fellowship research is in the lab of Tim Cornell, chief of pediatric critical care at Stanford. She is working to apply a real-time assay to measure cytokines in subsets of pediatric oncology patients to guide immunomodulatory therapies. By gaining a better understanding of these patients? immune responses in real time, she believes that we will open the door for precision immunomodulatory therapy to treat critically ill patients, especially those experiencing sepsis or cytokine release syndrome. After completion of her hematology/oncology fellowship, Dr. Reschke will be pursuing a pediatric intensive care fellowship with the hope of becoming a leader and pioneer in onco-critical care.

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