Bio

Bio


Dr. Nelligan is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Medicine, Division of Primary Care and Population Health. He is a family medicine physician with a passion for medical education, high quality primary care, and primary care research. He completed medical school at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill and residency at University of California San Francisco in Family and Community Medicine. Dr. Nelligan completed the Rathmann Family Medical Education Fellowship at Stanford and is an associate in the Stanford School of Medicine Educators for Care program. He is a champion for innovations in medical education, interdisciplinary education, and team based care. He is the Associate Medical Director of the Stanford MSPA program and course director in the Stanford Health Innovations and Experiential Learning Directive. He has long standing academic interests in community medicine, global health, working with underserved populations, and medical education.

Dr. Nelligan practices the full spectrum of primary care, from pediatrics to geriatrics. He is a specialist in primary care procedures including a wide variety of dermatologic, musculoskeletal, and gynecologic procedures. Dr. Nelligan is fluent in medical Spanish and strives to provide culturally and structurally competent care. LGBTQQI friendly.

Clinical Focus


  • Family Medicine
  • Global Health
  • Medical Education
  • Network, Community Health

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Associate Medical Director, Stanford University Masters in Physician Assistant Studies (2016 - Present)
  • Course Director, Stanford Healthcare Innovations and Experiential Learning Directive (2016 - Present)
  • Associate, Educators-4-CARE (E4C) (2015 - Present)
  • Co-Director, SFM Procedure Service (2015 - 2017)
  • Rathmann Fellow, Rathmann Family Medical Education Fellowship (2015 - 2016)
  • Co-Director, Longitudinal Community Health Advocacy Medical Partnership (L-CHAMP) (2014 - 2016)

Honors & Awards


  • James Bell Bullitt Award, UNC Chapel Hill School of Medicine (5/2010)
  • Primary Care Award, North Carolina Area Health Education Centers (AHEC) (5/2005)
  • Eugene S. Mayer Community Service Honor Society, UNC Chapel Hill School of Medicine (3/2007)
  • John B. Graham Research Society, UNC Chapel Hill (3/2007)

Boards, Advisory Committees, Professional Organizations


  • Advisory Board Member, The Albert Schweitzer Fellowship, San Francisco Bay Area (2013 - Present)
  • Member, American Academy of Family Physicians (2010 - Present)

Professional Education


  • Residency:UCSF Family Practice Residency (2013) CA
  • MPH, University of North Carolina Gillings School of Global Public Health, Public Health (2008)
  • Medical Education:University of North Carolina Chapel Hill (2010) NC
  • Board Certification: Family Medicine, American Board of Family Medicine (2013)

Community and International Work


  • UCSF Global Health Scholar, Nairobi, Kenya

    Topic

    CAP Survey of COPC in Kenya

    Ongoing Project

    No

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

  • CDC Hubert Fellowship

    Topic

    H1N1 Influenza Pandemic

    Partnering Organization(s)

    Center of Disease Control

    Populations Served

    Kenyan Health Workers

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    No

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

  • Lawrence Zollicoffer Community Health Fellowship

    Topic

    HIV outreach and education

    Partnering Organization(s)

    Health Department; Strength Through Youth Livin’ Empowered Program

    Populations Served

    Recently immigrated Latino men

    Location

    US

    Ongoing Project

    No

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

Publications

All Publications


  • Impact of Scribes on Physician Satisfaction, Patient Satisfaction, and Charting Efficiency: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Annals of family medicine Gidwani, R., Nguyen, C., Kofoed, A., Carragee, C., Rydel, T., Nelligan, I., Sattler, A., Mahoney, M., Lin, S. 2017; 15 (5): 427–33

    Abstract

    Scribes are increasingly being used in clinical practice despite a lack of high-quality evidence regarding their effects. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of medical scribes on physician satisfaction, patient satisfaction, and charting efficiency.We conducted a randomized controlled trial in which physicians in an academic family medicine clinic were randomized to 1 week with a scribe then 1 week without a scribe for the course of 1 year. Scribes drafted all relevant documentation, which was reviewed by the physician before attestation and signing. In encounters without a scribe, the physician performed all charting duties. Our outcomes were physician satisfaction, measured by a 5-item instrument that included physicians' perceptions of chart quality and chart accuracy; patient satisfaction, measured by a 6-item instrument; and charting efficiency, measured by time to chart close.Scribes improved all aspects of physician satisfaction, including overall satisfaction with clinic (OR = 10.75), having enough face time with patients (OR = 3.71), time spent charting (OR = 86.09), chart quality (OR = 7.25), and chart accuracy (OR = 4.61) (all P values <.001). Scribes had no effect on patient satisfaction. Scribes increased the proportion of charts that were closed within 48 hours (OR =1.18, P =.028).To our knowledge, we have conducted the first randomized controlled trial of scribes. We found that scribes produced significant improvements in overall physician satisfaction, satisfaction with chart quality and accuracy, and charting efficiency without detracting from patient satisfaction. Scribes appear to be a promising strategy to improve health care efficiency and reduce physician burnout.

    View details for DOI 10.1370/afm.2122

    View details for PubMedID 28893812

  • An assessment of implementation of CommunityOriented Primary Care in Kenyan family medicine postgraduate medical education programmes. African journal of primary health care & family medicine Nelligan, I. J., Shabani, J., Taché, S., Mohamoud, G., Mahoney, M. 2016; 8 (1): e1-e4

    Abstract

    Family medicine postgraduate programmes in Kenya are examining the benefits of Community-Oriented Primary Care (COPC) curriculum, as a method to train residents in population-based approaches to health care delivery. Whilst COPC is an established part of family medicine training in the United States, little is known about its application in Kenya. We sought to conduct a qualitative study to explore the development and implementation of COPC curriculum in the first two family medicine postgraduate programmes in Kenya.Semi-structured interviews of COPC educators, practitioners, and academic stakeholders and focus groups of postgraduate students were conducted with COPC educators, practitioners and academic stakeholders in two family medicine postgraduate programmes in Kenya. Discussions were transcribed, inductively coded and thematically analysed.Two focus groups with eight family medicine postgraduate students and interviews with five faculty members at two universities were conducted. Two broad themes emerged from the analysis: expected learning outcomes and important community-based enablers. Three learning outcomes were (1) making a community diagnosis, (2) understanding social determinants of health and (3) training in participatory research. Three community-based enablers for sustainability of COPC were (1) partnerships with community health workers, (2) community empowerment and engagement and (3) institutional financial support.Our findings illustrate the expected learning outcomes and important communitybased enablers associated with the successful implementation of COPC projects in Kenya and will help to inform future curriculum development in Kenya.

    View details for DOI 10.4102/phcfm.v8i1.1064

    View details for PubMedID 28155322

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC5153406

  • Creating the medical school of the future through incremental curricular transformation: the Stanford Healthcare Innovations and Experiential Learning Directive (SHIELD). Education for primary care : an official publication of the Association of Course Organisers, National Association of GP Tutors, World Organisation of Family Doctors Lin, S., Osborn, K., Sattler, A., Nelligan, I., Svec, D., Aaronson, A., Schillinger, E. 2016: 1-5

    View details for PubMedID 27892817

  • Are Kenyan healthcare workers willing to receive the pandemic influenza vaccine? Results from a cross-sectional survey of healthcare workers in Kenya about knowledge, attitudes and practices concerning infection with and vaccination against 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1), 2010 VACCINE Oria, P. A., Matini, W., Nelligan, I., Emukule, G., Scherzer, M., Oyier, B., Ochieng, H. N., Hooper, L., Kanyuga, A., Muthoka, P., Morales, K. F., Nzioka, C., Breiman, R. F., Katz, M. A. 2011; 29 (19): 3617-3622

    Abstract

    Over 1200 cases of 2009 pandemic influenza A H1N1 (pH1N1) have been identified in Kenya since the first case in June 2009. In April 2010 the Kenyan government launched a program to immunize high-risk groups and healthcare workers (HCWs) with pH1N1 vaccines donated by the World Health Organization. To characterize HCWs' knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding pH1N1 vaccination, we conducted a quantitative and qualitative survey in 20 healthcare facilities across Kenya between January 11 and 26, 2010. Of 659 HCWs interviewed, 55% thought there was a vaccine against pH1N1, and 89% indicated that they would receive pH1N1 vaccine if it became available. In focus group discussions, many HCWs said that pH1N1 virus infection did not cause severe disease in Kenyans and questioned the need for vaccination. However, most were willing to accept vaccination if they had adequate information on safety and efficacy. In order for the influenza vaccination campaign to be successful, HCWs must understand that pH1N1 can cause severe disease in Kenyans, that pH1N1 vaccination can prevent HCWs from transmitting influenza to their patients, and that the vaccine has been widely used globally with few recognized adverse events.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.vaccine.2011.01.063

    View details for Web of Science ID 000291072400014

    View details for PubMedID 21296117