Bio

Honors & Awards


  • The Walter V. and Idun Berry Postdoctoral Fellowship, Stanford University (2018)
  • Stanford School of Medicine Dean’s Postdoctoral Fellowship, Stanford University (2018)
  • Stanford ChEM-H Postdocs at the Interface Postdoctoral Fellowship, Stanford University (2017)
  • Lawrence S. Dillion Distinguished Graduate Student Award, Texas A&M University (2016)
  • The Allied Genetics Conference Travel Award, Genetics Society of America (2016)
  • Best Graduate Student Oral Presentation, Texas A&M University (2015)
  • Best Graduate Student Oral Presentation, Southern Plains Zebrafish Meeting (2012)

Professional Education


  • Bachelor of Science, Bogazici University (2010)
  • Doctor of Philosophy, Texas A&M University College Station (2017)

Research & Scholarship

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


I am very interested in discovering the signals that glial cells and neurons use to communicate with each other, and understanding how these signals regulate neural function and myelination in the nervous system.

Publications

All Publications


  • Spemann organizer gene Goosecoid promotes delamination of neuroblasts from the otic vesicle PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Kantarci, H., Gerberding, A., Riley, B. B. 2016; 113 (44): E6840–E6848

    Abstract

    Neurons of the Statoacoustic Ganglion (SAG), which innervate the inner ear, originate as neuroblasts in the floor of the otic vesicle and subsequently delaminate and migrate toward the hindbrain before completing differentiation. In all vertebrates, locally expressed Fgf initiates SAG development by inducing expression of Neurogenin1 (Ngn1) in the floor of the otic vesicle. However, not all Ngn1-positive cells undergo delamination, nor has the mechanism controlling SAG delamination been elucidated. Here we report that Goosecoid (Gsc), best known for regulating cellular dynamics in the Spemann organizer, regulates delamination of neuroblasts in the otic vesicle. In zebrafish, Fgf coregulates expression of Gsc and Ngn1 in partially overlapping domains, with delamination occurring primarily in the zone of overlap. Loss of Gsc severely inhibits delamination, whereas overexpression of Gsc greatly increases delamination. Comisexpression of Ngn1 and Gsc induces ectopic delamination of some cells from the medial wall of the otic vesicle but with a low incidence, suggesting the action of a local inhibitor. The medial marker Pax2a is required to restrict the domain of gsc expression, and misexpression of Pax2a is sufficient to block delamination and fully suppress the effects of Gsc The opposing activities of Gsc and Pax2a correlate with repression or up-regulation, respectively, of E-cadherin (cdh1). These data resolve a genetic mechanism controlling delamination of otic neuroblasts. The data also elucidate a developmental role for Gsc consistent with a general function in promoting epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT).

    View details for PubMedID 27791112

  • Tfap2a Promotes Specification and Maturation of Neurons in the Inner Ear through Modulation of Bmp, Fgf and Notch Signaling PLOS GENETICS Kantarci, H., Edlund, R. K., Groves, A. K., Riley, B. B. 2015; 11 (3): e1005037

    Abstract

    Neurons of the statoacoustic ganglion (SAG) transmit auditory and vestibular information from the inner ear to the hindbrain. SAG neuroblasts originate in the floor of the otic vesicle. New neuroblasts soon delaminate and migrate towards the hindbrain while continuing to proliferate, a phase known as transit amplification. SAG cells eventually come to rest between the ear and hindbrain before terminally differentiating. Regulation of these events is only partially understood. Fgf initiates neuroblast specification within the ear. Subsequently, Fgf secreted by mature SAG neurons exceeds a maximum threshold, serving to terminate specification and delay maturation of transit-amplifying cells. Notch signaling also limits SAG development, but how it is coordinated with Fgf is unknown. Here we show that transcription factor Tfap2a coordinates multiple signaling pathways to promote neurogenesis in the zebrafish inner ear. In both zebrafish and chick, Tfap2a is expressed in a ventrolateral domain of the otic vesicle that includes neurogenic precursors. Functional studies were conducted in zebrafish. Loss of Tfap2a elevated Fgf and Notch signaling, thereby inhibiting SAG specification and slowing maturation of transit-amplifying cells. Conversely, overexpression of Tfap2a inhibited Fgf and Notch signaling, leading to excess and accelerated SAG production. However, most SAG neurons produced by Tfap2a overexpression died soon after maturation. Directly blocking either Fgf or Notch caused less dramatic acceleration of SAG development without neuronal death, whereas blocking both pathways mimicked all observed effects of Tfap2a overexpression, including apoptosis of mature neurons. Analysis of genetic mosaics showed that Tfap2a acts non-autonomously to inhibit Fgf. This led to the discovery that Tfap2a activates expression of Bmp7a, which in turn inhibits both Fgf and Notch signaling. Blocking Bmp signaling reversed the effects of overexpressing Tfap2a. Together, these data support a model in which Tfap2a, acting through Bmp7a, modulates Fgf and Notch signaling to control the duration, amount and speed of SAG neural development.

    View details for PubMedID 25781991

  • Foxi transcription factors promote pharyngeal arch development by regulating formation of FGF signaling centers DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY Edlund, R. K., Ohyama, T., Kantarci, H., Riley, B. B., Groves, A. K. 2014; 390 (1): 1–13

    Abstract

    The bones of the vertebrate face develop from transient embryonic branchial arches that are populated by cranial neural crest cells. We have characterized a mouse mutant for the Forkhead family transcription factor Foxi3, which is expressed in branchial ectoderm and endoderm. Foxi3 mutant mice are not viable and display severe branchial arch-derived facial skeleton defects, including absence of all but the most distal tip of the mandible and complete absence of the inner, middle and external ear structures. Although cranial neural crest cells of Foxi3 mutants are able to migrate, populate the branchial arches, and display some elements of correct proximo-distal patterning, they succumb to apoptosis from embryonic day 9.75 onwards. We show this cell death correlates with a delay in expression of Fgf8 in branchial arch ectoderm and a failure of neural crest cells in the arches to express FGF-responsive genes. Zebrafish foxi1 is also expressed in branchial arch ectoderm and endoderm, and morpholino knock-down of foxi1 also causes apoptosis of neural crest in the branchial arches. We show that heat shock induction of fgf3 in zebrafish arch tissue can rescue cell death in foxi1 morphants. Our results suggest that Foxi3 may play a role in the establishment of signaling centers in the branchial arches that are required for neural crest survival, patterning and the subsequent development of branchial arch derivatives.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.ydbio.2014.03.004

    View details for Web of Science ID 000334568200001

    View details for PubMedID 24650709

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC4013273

  • A Spatial and Temporal Gradient of Fgf Differentially Regulates Distinct Stages of Neural Development in the Zebrafish Inner Ear PLOS GENETICS Vemaraju, S., Kantarci, H., Padanad, M. S., Riley, B. B. 2012; 8 (11): e1003068

    Abstract

    Neuroblasts of the statoacoustic ganglion (SAG) initially form in the floor of the otic vesicle during a relatively brief developmental window. They soon delaminate and undergo a protracted phase of proliferation and migration (transit-amplification). Neuroblasts eventually differentiate and extend processes bi-directionally to synapse with hair cells in the inner ear and various targets in the hindbrain. Our studies in zebrafish have shown that Fgf signaling controls multiple phases of this complex developmental process. Moderate levels of Fgf in a gradient emanating from the nascent utricular macula specify SAG neuroblasts in laterally adjacent otic epithelium. At a later stage, differentiating SAG neurons express Fgf5, which serves two functions: First, as SAG neurons accumulate, increasing levels of Fgf exceed an upper threshold that terminates the initial phase of neuroblast specification. Second, elevated Fgf delays differentiation of transit-amplifying cells, balancing the rate of progenitor renewal with neuronal differentiation. Laser-ablation of mature SAG neurons abolishes feedback-inhibition and causes precocious neuronal differentiation. Similar effects are obtained by Fgf5-knockdown or global impairment of Fgf signaling, whereas Fgf misexpression has the opposite effect. Thus Fgf signaling renders SAG development self-regulating, ensuring steady production of an appropriate number of neurons as the larva grows.

    View details for DOI 10.1371/journal.pgen.1003068

    View details for Web of Science ID 000311891600052

    View details for PubMedID 23166517

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC3499369