Bio

Bio


Dr. Shan specializes in providing blood transfusion treatment to patients with diverse medical problems. She has been practicing transfusion medicine for over twenty years. Dr. Shan currently serves as the Medical Director of Transfusion Service at Stanford Medical Center. Dr. Shan has also been leading research programs in the fields of transfusion safety, blood availability and optimazing clinical blood transfusion practice.

Clinical Focus


  • Transfusion Medicine
  • Clinical Pathology

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Medical Director, Transfusion Medicine Service, Stanford Health Center (2015 - Present)
  • Associate Medical Director, Stanford Blood Center (2015 - Present)

Boards, Advisory Committees, Professional Organizations


  • Editorial board member, "Transfusion Medicine Review" (2017 - Present)
  • Editorial board member, "Transfusion" (2017 - Present)
  • Chair, NHLBI's REDS-III International Steering Committee (2016 - Present)
  • Member, AABB Transfusion Transmitted Disease Committee (2013 - 2017)
  • Member, NHLBI's REDS-III International Steering Committee (2008 - 2016)
  • Editorial board member, "Chinese Journal of Blood Transfusion" (2007 - Present)
  • Member, College of American Pathologists's Transfusion Medicine Resource Committee (2005 - 2007)
  • Member, International Society of Blood Transfusion (ISBT) (2004 - Present)
  • Member, AABB (1994 - Present)
  • Member, College of American Pathologists (1994 - Present)

Professional Education


  • Board Certification: Blood Banking/Transfusion Medicine, American Board of Pathology (2000)
  • Medical Education:Beijing Medical University (1983) China
  • PhD, University of Pennsylvania, Immunology (1991)
  • Residency:Hospital of Univ of Pennsylvania (1996) PA
  • Board Certification: Clinical Pathology, American Board of Pathology (1996)
  • Fellowship:Hospital of Univ of Pennsylvania GME Verifications (1997) PA

Community and International Work


  • NHLBI Recipient Epidemiology and Donor Evaluation Study-III (REDS-III) International program

    Topic

    Transfusion Medicine

    Partnering Organization(s)

    Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

  • NIH Fogarty International Blood Safety Program

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    No

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

Teaching

2017-18 Courses


Graduate and Fellowship Programs


  • Transfusion Medicine (Fellowship Program)

Publications

All Publications


  • A 30-year systematic review and meta-analysis of hepatitis B virus among blood donors in mainland China: revealing increase of new threats. Transfusion Gao, Z., Zhang, Y., Shan, H., Shi, L., Liu, J., Xu, M., Zeng, P., Liu, Y., He, M. 2017

    Abstract

    Although screening strategies have been routinely implemented in blood centers, the residual risk of transfusion-transmitted hepatitis B virus (HBV) still poses a public health concern in China. The aim of this study is to investigate the HBV blood screening reactive rate and to illustrate the demographics of the corresponding blood donors with revealing of heterogeneity between previous studies and discovering potentially negligent threats.Literature reporting the HBV screening reactive rate in Chinese blood donors was identified by systematic searching of four electronic databases. We followed the Preferred Reporting of Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines, and data manipulation and statistical analyses were performed by Stata 12.0.Our results showed that the pooled postdonation screening reactive rate was 1.32% (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.28%-1.36%) with a significant variation from 3.93% (95% CI, 3.45%-4.40%) before 1998 to 1.22% (95% CI, 1.18%-1.27%) after 1998 when the Blood Donation Law was implemented. Importantly, the HBV screening reactive rates were significantly higher among replacement and planned donors than among individual voluntary donors.Our results indicated blood centers in China should recruit more individual and group voluntary donors and convert more eligible first-time donors into repeat donors to reduce the risk of transfusion-transmitted HBV.

    View details for DOI 10.1111/trf.14162

    View details for PubMedID 28543021

  • The association of elevated alanine aminotransferase levels with hepatitis E virus infections among blood donors in China. Transfusion Wang, M., He, M., Wu, B., Ke, L., Han, T., Wang, J., Shan, H., Ness, P., Guo, N., Liu, Y., Nelson, K. E. 2017; 57 (2): 273-279

    Abstract

    Transfusion transmission of hepatitis E virus (HEV) is an emerging health risk, yet blood donors are rarely screened for this pathogen. Many blood centers instituted screening of blood donors for elevated levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels to prevent hepatitis C virus, which has continued in China. We evaluated whether elevated ALT levels were associated with HEV among blood donors in China.Blood samples were collected from 9069 qualified volunteer blood donors from four blood centers in China. A total of 5023 had elevated ALT levels, that is, more than 40 IU/L, and 4046 samples had normal ALT. We tested all the 9069 samples for anti-HEV immunoglobulin (Ig)M, anti-HEV IgG, and HEV antigen. Those who were positive for anti-HEV IgM or HEV antigen were tested individually for HEV RNA by polymerase chain reaction.The prevalence of anti-HEV IgG in donors with elevated ALT levels (33.3%) was higher than those with normal ALT (24.9%; p < 0.01). The prevalence of anti-HEV IgM was similar in donations with increased ALT (1.41%) and normal ALT (1.46%). More ALT-elevated donations were HEV antigen positive, 62 of 5023 (1.23%), than were ALT-normal donations, seven of 4046 (0.17%; p < 0.01). Six donors with elevated ALT levels and acute HEV infection markers (anti-HEV IgM or HEV antigen) were HEV RNA positive.Markers of active infection including HEV antigen and HEV RNA are significantly more common among donors with elevated ALT levels in China. These data support the fact that ALT testing of donors to HEV antigen or HEV RNA would have greater specificity and exclude fewer acceptable donors.

    View details for DOI 10.1111/trf.13991

    View details for PubMedID 28194856

  • Patient Blood Management: An International Perspective ANESTHESIA AND ANALGESIA Eichbaum, Q., Murphy, M., Liu, Y., Kajja, I., Hajjar, L. A., Sibinga, C. T., Shan, H. 2016; 123 (6): 1574-1581