School of Medicine


Showing 1-100 of 490 Results

  • Oscar J. Abilez

    Oscar J. Abilez

    Instructor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Bioengineering, biophysical control of cardiovascular development, pluripotent stem cell biology, optogenetics, electrophysiology, cell mechanics, directed cellular evolution, multiscale engineering, microfluidics, computational biology

  • Steven R. Alexander, MD

    Steven R. Alexander, MD

    Professor of Pediatrics (Nephrology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dialysis, kidney transplantation, continuous renal replacement therapy in pediatric patients; chronic kidney disease in pediatric patients.

  • Ash A. Alizadeh, MD/PhD

    Ash A. Alizadeh, MD/PhD

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research is focused on attaining a better understanding of the initiation, maintenance, and progression of tumors, and their response to current therapies toward improving future treatment strategies. In this effort, I employ tools from functional genomics, computational biology, molecular genetics, and mouse models.

    Clinically, I specialize in the care of patients with lymphomas, working on translating our findings in prospective cancer clinical trials.

  • Russ B. Altman

    Russ B. Altman

    Kenneth Fong Professor and Professor of Bioengineering, of Genetics, of Medicine (General Medical Discipline), of Biomedical Data Science and, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I refer you to my web page for detailed list of interests, projects and publications. In addition to pressing the link here, you can search "Russ Altman" on http://www.google.com/

  • Cristina M. Alvira

    Cristina M. Alvira

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Critical Care)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The overall objective of the Alvira Laboratory is to elucidate the mechanisms that promote postnatal lung development and repair, by focusing on three main scientific goals: (i) identification of the signaling pathways that direct the transition between the saccular and alveolar stages of lung development; (ii) exploration of the interplay between postnatal vascular and alveolar development; and (iii) determination of developmentally regulated pathways that mediate lung repair after injury.

  • Manuel R. Amieva

    Manuel R. Amieva

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Infectious Diseases) and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My laboratory studies the strategies pathogens utilize to colonize and subvert the epithelial barrier. We have focused on the epithelial junctions as a target for bacterial pathogens, since the cell-cell junctions serve as both a barrier to infection and also a major control site for epithelial function. In particular, we are interested in how the gastric pathogen Helicobater pylori may cause cancer by interfering with cell signaling at the epithelial junctions. We are also studying how various bacteria cross and invade the epithelium. For example, we recently found that Listeria monocytogenes targets a specialized subset of cell-cell junctions at the tip of the intestinal villi to find its receptor for invasion. We are interested in determining whether this mode of gastrointestinal invasion of the epithelium is also used by other gastrointestinal pathogens.

  • Kanwaljeet Anand

    Kanwaljeet Anand

    Professor of Pediatrics (Pediatric Critical Care) and of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Anand is a translational clinical researcher who pioneered research on the endocrine-metabolic stress responses of infants undergoing surgery and developed the first-ever scientific rationale for pain perception in early life. This provided a framework for newer methods of pain assessment, numerous clinical trials of analgesia/anesthesia in newborns, infants and older children. His research focus over the past 30+ years has contributed fundamental knowledge about pediatric pain/stress, long-term effects of pain in early life, management of pain, mechanisms for opioid tolerance and withdrawal. Current projects in his laboratory are focused on developing biomarkers for repetitive pain/stress in critically ill children and the mechanisms underlying sedative/anesthetic neurotoxicity in the immature brain. He designed and directed many randomized clinical trials (RCT), including the largest-ever pediatric analgesia trial studying morphine therapy in ventilated preterm neonates. He has extensive experience in clinical and translational research from participating in collaborative networks funded by NIMH, NINDS, or NICHD, a track-record of excellent collaboration across multiple disciplines, while achieving success with large research teams like the Collaborative Pediatric Critical Care Research Network (CPCCRN). He played a leadership roles in CANDLE (Condition Affecting Neuro-Development & Learning in Early infancy) and other activities of the Urban Child Institute and UT Neuroscience Institute. More recently, he led the NeoOpioid Consortium funded by the European Commission, which collected data from 243 NICUs in 18 European countries.

  • Jason Andrews

    Jason Andrews

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory aims to develop and test innovative approaches to the diagnosis, treatment and control of infectious diseases in resource-limited settings. We draw upon multiple fields including mathematical modeling, microbial genetics, field epidemiology, statistical inference and biodesign to work on challenging problems in infectious diseases, with an emphasis on tuberculosis and tropical diseases.

  • Justin P. Annes M.D., Ph.D.

    Justin P. Annes M.D., Ph.D.

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The ANNES LABORATORY of Molecular Endocrinology: Leveraging Chemical Biology to Treat Endocrine Disorders

    DIABETES
    The prevalence of diabetes is increasing at a staggering rate. By the year 2050 an astounding 25% of Americans will be diabetic. The goal of my research is to uncover therapeutic strategies to stymie the ensuing diabetes epidemic. To achieve this goal we have developed a variety of innovate experimental approaches to uncover novel approaches to curing diabetes.

    (1) Beta-Cell Regeneration: Diabetes results from either an absolute or relative deficiency in insulin production. Our therapeutic strategy is to stimulate the regeneration of insulin-producing beta-cells to enhance an individual?s insulin secretion capacity. We have developed a unique high-throughput chemical screening platform which we use to identify small molecules that promote beta-cell growth. This work has led to the identification of key molecular pathways (therapeutic targets) and candidate drugs that promote the growth and regeneration of islet beta-cells. Our goal is to utilize these discoveries to treat and prevent diabetes.

    (2) The Metabolic Syndrome: A major cause of the diabetes epidemic is the rise in obesity which leads to a cluster of diabetes- and cardiovascular disease-related metabolic abnormalities that shorten life expectancy. These physiologic aberrations are collectively termed the Metabolic Syndrome (MS). My laboratory has developed an original in vivo screening platform t to identify novel hormones that influence the behaviors (excess caloric consumption, deficient exercise and disrupted sleep-wake cycles) and the metabolic abnormalities caused by obesity. We aim to manipulate these hormone levels to prevent the development and detrimental consequences of the MS.

    HEREDIATY PARAGAGLIOMA SYNDROME
    The Hereditary Paraganglioma Syndrome (hPGL) is a rare genetic cancer syndrome that is most commonly caused by a defect in mitochondrial metabolism. Our goal is to understand how altered cellular metabolism leads to the development of cancer. Although hPGL is uncommon, it serves as an excellent model for the abnormal metabolic behavior displayed by nearly all cancers. Our goal is to develop novel therapeutic strategies that target the abnormal behavior of cancer cells. In the laboratory we have developed hPGL mouse models and use high throughput chemical screening to identify the therapeutic susceptibilities that result from the abnormal metabolic behavior of cancer cells.

    As a physician scientist trained in clinical genetics I have developed expertise in hereditary endocrine disorders and devoted my efforts to treating families affected by the hPGL syndrome. By leveraging our laboratory expertise in the hPGL syndrome, our care for individuals who have inherited the hPGL syndrome is at the forefront of medicine. Our goal is to translate our laboratory discoveries to the treatment of affected families.

  • Ronald L. Ariagno

    Ronald L. Ariagno

    Professor (Clinical) of Pediatrics, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Developmental Physiology and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Research Laboratory closed in 2008.

    Current effort, as Chair of Task Force and neonatal consult at the FDA, is to establish through consensus a culture of investigation and collaboration for all clinical neonatology practices: academic, corporate and community based to maximize the opportunity to participate in research effort needed for the regulatory approval of neonatal therapeutics to improve the outcome of critically ill infants.

  • Steven Artandi

    Steven Artandi

    Jerome and Daisy Low Gilbert Professor and Professor of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Telomeres are nucleoprotein complexes that protect chromosome ends and shorten with cell division and aging. We are interested in how telomere shortening influences cancer, stem cell function, aging and human disease. Telomerase is a reverse transcriptase that synthesizes telomere repeats and is expressed in stem cells and in cancer. We have found that telomerase also regulates stem cells and we are pursuing the function of telomerase through diverse genetic and biochemical approaches.

  • Ann M. Arvin

    Ann M. Arvin

    Vice Provost and Dean of Research, Lucile Salter Packard Professor of Pediatrics and Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory investigates the pathogenesis of varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection, focusing on the functional roles of particular viral gene products in pathogenesis and virus-cell interactions in differentiated human cells in humans and in Scid-hu mouse models of VZV cell tropisms in vivo, and the immunobiology of VZV infections.

  • Euan A. Ashley

    Euan A. Ashley

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular) and, by courtesy, of Pathology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Ashley lab is focused on precision medicine. We develop methods for the interpretation of whole genome sequencing data to improve diagnosis of genetic disease and to personalize the practice of medicine. We also use network approaches to characterize biology. The wet bench is where we take advantage of cell systems, transgenic models and microsurgical models of disease to prove causality of our favorite targets.

  • Tim L. Assimes, MD PhD

    Tim L. Assimes, MD PhD

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Genetic Epidemiology, Genetic Determinants of Complex Traits related to Cardiovasular Medicine, Coronary Artery Disease related pathway analyses and integrative genomics, Mendelian randomization studies, risk prediction for major adverse cardiovascular events, cardiovascular medicine related pharmacogenomics, ethnic differences in the determinants of Insulin Mediated Glucose Uptake, pharmacoepidemiology of cardiovascular drugs & outcomes

  • Laura Attardi

    Laura Attardi

    Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation and Cancer Biology) and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research is aimed at defining the pathways of p53-mediated apoptosis and tumor suppression, using a combination of biochemical, cell biological, and mouse genetic approaches. Our strategy is to start by generating hypotheses about p53 mechanisms of action using primary mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs), and then to test them using gene targeting technology in the mouse.

  • Jeffrey Axelrod

    Jeffrey Axelrod

    Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Genetic and cell biological analyses of signals controlling cell polarity and morphogenesis. Frizzled signaling and cytoskeletal organization.

  • Rosa Bacchetta

    Rosa Bacchetta

    Associate Professor (Research) of Pediatrics (Stem Cell Transplantation)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests In the coming years, I plan to further determine the genetic and immunological basis of diseases with autoimmunity or immune dysregulation in children. I believe that much can still be learned from the in depth mechanistic studies of pediatric autoimmune diseases. Genomic analysis of the patients' samples has become possible which may provide a rapid indication of altered target molecules. I plan to implement robust functional studies to define the consequences of these genetic abnormalities and bridge them to the patient's clinical phenotype.

    Understanding functional consequences of gene mutations in single case/family first and then validating the molecular and cellular defects in other patients with similar phenotypes, will anticipate and complement cellular and gene therapy strategies.

    For further information please visit the Bacchetta Lab website:
    http://med.stanford.edu/bacchettalab.html

  • Laura K. Bachrach

    Laura K. Bachrach

    Professor of Pediatrics (Endocrinology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Prevention of osteoporosis begins in childhood and adolescence by measures that maximize acquistion of bone mineral during the critical adolescent years. Body mass, calcium nutriture, physical activity, growth and sex steroid hormones, and genetic factors are all thought to be important determinants of bone mass although the relative contribution of each remains controversial.

  • Julie Baker

    Julie Baker

    Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory is focused on identifying proteins based upon their ability to alter a variety of cell fate decisions - including mesodermal, endodermal, neural, endothelial, and somitic - within the vertebrate embryo.

  • Valerie L. Baker, MD

    Valerie L. Baker, MD

    Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests primary ovarian insufficiency, premature ovarian failure, infertilty, assisted reproductive technology, ovulation induction, hormone therapy

  • Maria Barna

    Maria Barna

    Assistant Professor of Genetics and of Developmental Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our lab studies how intricate control of gene expression and cell signaling is regulated on a minute-by-minute basis to give rise to the remarkable diversity of cell types and tissue morphology that form the living blueprints of developing organisms. Work in the Barna lab is presently split into two main research efforts. The first is investigating ribosome-mediated control of gene expression genome-wide in space and time during cellular differentiation and organismal development. This research is opening a new field of study in which we apply sophisticated mass spectrometry, computational biology, genomics, and developmental genetics, to characterize a ribosome code to gene expression. Our research has shown that not all of the millions of ribosomes within a cell are the same and that ribosome heterogeneity can diversify how genomes are translated into proteomes. In particular, we seek to address whether fundamental aspects of gene regulation are controlled by ribosomes harboring a unique activity or composition that are tuned to translating specific transcripts by virtue of RNA regulatory elements embedded within their 5?UTRs. The second research effort is centered on employing state-of-the-art live cell imaging to visualize cell signaling and cellular control of organogenesis. This research has led to the realization of a novel means of cell-cell communication dependent on a dense network of actin-based cellular extension within developing organs that interconnect and facilitate the precise transmission of molecular information between cells. We apply and create bioengineering tools to manipulate such cellular interactions and signaling in-vivo.

  • Patrick Barnes

    Patrick Barnes

    Professor of Radiology (Pediatric Radiology) at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Advanced imaging, including magnetic resonance imaging, of injury to the developing central nervous system; including fetal, neonatal, infant and young child; and, including nonaccidental injury (e.g. child abuse).

  • Richard Barth

    Richard Barth

    Professor of Radiology (Pediatric Radiology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Sonographic diagnosis of fetal anomalies.
    Focus interest in the diagnosis and conservative (non-surgical and minimal radiation) management of congenital broncho pulmonary malformations.
    Imaging of appendicitis in children.
    Sonography of the pediatric testis.

  • Dorsey Bass

    Dorsey Bass

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Gastroenterology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory is interested in the pathophysiology, immunology, and epidemiology of viral gastroenteritis.

  • Sanjay Basu

    Sanjay Basu

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Primary Care and Outcomes Research) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests mathematical models
    operations research
    primary care
    public health
    econometrics
    global health
    social determinants of health
    health policy
    health disparities

  • Fiona Baumer

    Fiona Baumer

    Instructor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am researching the neurobiology underlying cognitive problems in pediatric epilepsy. I am using transcranial magnetic stimulation paired with EMG and EEG to study cortical excitability and plasticity in children with benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS or Rolandic Epilepsy). I am investigating whether changes in plasticity affect a child's ability to learn.

  • Barry R. Behr, PhD, HCLD

    Barry R. Behr, PhD, HCLD

    Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Development of improved embryo culture conditions in vitro. Blastocyst cultures. Embryo metabolism in vitro. Embryo maternal dialogue. Clinical application and integration of extended embryo culture systems. Monozygotic twinning. Prevention of multiple pregnancy. Sperm motility enhancers. Fluorescent and non-fluorescent markers of sperm morphology and viablility. Oocyte cryopreservation. Fertility preservation. Improving IVF outcome.

  • Gill Bejerano

    Gill Bejerano

    Associate Professor of Developmental Biology, of Computer Science and of Pediatrics (Genetics)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Bejerano, co-discoverer of ultraconserved elements, studies the Human Genome. His research focuses on genome sequence and function in both humans and related primate, mammalian and vertebrate species. He is deeply interested in mapping both coding and non-coding genome sequence variation to phenotype differences, and in extracting specific genetic insights from high throughput sequencing measurements, in the contexts of development and developmental abnormalities.

  • Eran Bendavid

    Eran Bendavid

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Effect of global health policies on health of individuals in developing countries, global health, HIV and TB.

  • William Benitz

    William Benitz

    Philip Sunshine, M.D., Professor in Neonatology and Professor, by courtesy, of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Neonatology, patent ductus arteriosus, pulmonary hypertension of the newborn, infant ventilation, neonatal clinical protocols/clinical pathways.

  • David Bergman

    David Bergman

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (General Pediatrics) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research has involved the use of new technologies to create different types of patient-doctor transactions. I am also interested in how these new transactions impact clinical care processes. Current work includes the evaluation of a patient portal for children with cystic fibrosis, the use of telemedicine to bring asthma experts into the schools and the attitudes of teens and parents about the use of a secure patient portal for teens.

  • Michele Berk

    Michele Berk

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavior Sciences (Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Child Development) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The focus of my research is on adolescent suicidal and self-harm behavior. I am currently one of four Principal Investigators of a multisite NIMH-sponsored RCT of DBT for adolescents at high risk for suicide (NCT01528020: Collaborative Adolescent Research on Emotions and Suicide [CARES], PI: Linehan, McCauley, Berk, & Asarnow) aimed at evaluating the efficacy of DBT with adolescents compared to a combined individual and group supportive therapy control condition (IGST).

  • Daniel Bernstein

    Daniel Bernstein

    Alfred Woodley Salter and Mabel Smith Salter Endowed Professor in Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests 1. Role of the G protein coupled receptors in regulating mitochondrial structure and function.
    2. Differences between R and L ventricular responses to stress, including gene expression and miR regulation.
    3. Using iPSC-derived myocytes to understand heart failure and congenital heart disease.
    4. Tools for evaluation of cardiac physiology in transgenic mice and isolated cardiomyocytes.
    5. Anti-body mediated rejection.
    6. Biomarkers for post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder.

  • Jon Bernstein

    Jon Bernstein

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Genetics) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital and, by courtesy, of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My interests include the genetics of autism and other developmental disorders. In collaboration with colleagues at Stanford, I am working to develop induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) models of genetic disorders associated with developmental disability. I am also engaged in the application of new technologies (Whole genome sequencing, Multi-omics profiling) for the diagnosis of developmental disorders.

  • Edward Bertaccini

    Edward Bertaccini

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests molecular modeling of anesthetic-protein interactions, molecular modeling of the ligand-gated ion channels

  • Alice Bertaina

    Alice Bertaina

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Stem Cell Transplantation) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Bertaina is a highly experienced clinician and will play a key role in supporting Section Chief Dr. Rajni Agarwal and Clinical Staff in the Stem Cell Transplant Unit at Lucile Packard Children?s Hospital. She will also continue her research on immune recovery and miRNA, understanding the mechanisms underlying immune reconstitution, Graft-versus-Host Disease (GvHD), and leukemia relapse after allogeneic HSCT in pediatric patients affected by hematological malignant and non-malignant disorders.

  • Carolyn Bertozzi

    Carolyn Bertozzi

    Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences and Professor, by courtesy, of Radiology and of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Bio Professor Carolyn Bertozzi's research interests span the disciplines of chemistry and biology with an emphasis on studies of cell surface sugars important to human health and disease. Her research group profiles changes in cell surface glycosylation associated with cancer, inflammation and bacterial infection, and uses this information to develop new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, most recently in the area of immuno-oncology.

    Dr. Bertozzi completed her undergraduate degree in Chemistry at Harvard University and her Ph.D. at UC Berkeley, focusing on the chemical synthesis of oligosaccharide analogs. During postdoctoral work at UC San Francisco, she studied the activity of endothelial oligosaccharides in promoting cell adhesion at sites of inflammation. She joined the UC Berkeley faculty in 1996. A Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator since 2000, she came to Stanford University in June 2015, among the first faculty to join the interdisciplinary institute ChEM-H (Chemistry, Engineering & Medicine for Human Health). Named a MacArthur Fellow in 1999, Dr. Bertozzi has received many awards for her dedication to chemistry, and to training a new generation of scientists fluent in both chemistry and biology. She has been elected to the Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences, and American Academy of Arts and Sciences; and received the Lemelson-MIT Prize, the Heinrich Wieland Prize, and the ACS Award in Pure Chemistry, among many others. Her efforts in undergraduate education have earned the UC Berkeley Distinguished Teaching Award and the Donald Sterling Noyce Prize for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching.

    Today, the Bertozzi Group at Stanford studies the glycobiology underlying diseases such as cancer, inflammatory disorders such as arthritis, and infectious diseases such as tuberculosis. The work has advanced understanding of cell surface oligosaccharides involved in cell recognition and inter-cellular communication.

    Dr. Bertozzi's lab also develops new methods to perform controlled chemical reactions within living systems. The group has developed new tools for studying glycans in living systems, and more recently nanotechnologies for probing biological systems. Such "bioorthoganol" chemistries enable manipulation of biomolecules in their living environment.

    Several of the technologies developed in the Bertozzi lab have been adapted for commercial use. Actively engaged with several biotechnology start-ups, Dr. Bertozzi founded Redwood Bioscience of Emeryville, California, and has served on the research advisory board of GlaxoSmithKline.

  • Vivek Bhalla, MD, FASN, FAHA

    Vivek Bhalla, MD, FASN, FAHA

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Nephrology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Bhalla's two primary research interests are in the interaction of the kidney in diabetes and hypertension. We use molecular, biochemical, and transgenic approaches to study mechanisms of physiologic and aberrant ion handling and its consequences for hypertension in obesity and insulin resistance. We also study mechanisms of susceptibility to diabetic kidney disease including the role of the endothelium to regulate inflammation and kidney injury.

  • Ami Bhatt

    Ami Bhatt

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Hematology) and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Bhatt lab is exploring how the microbiota is intertwined with states of health and disease. We apply the most modern genetic tools in an effort to deconvolute the mechanism of human diseases.

  • Nidhi Bhutani

    Nidhi Bhutani

    Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The long-term goal of our research is to understand the fundamental mechanisms that govern and reprogram cellular fate during development, regeneration and disease.

  • Vinod (Vinny) K. Bhutani

    Vinod (Vinny) K. Bhutani

    Professor of Pediatrics (Neonatology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Neonatology; newborn jaundice, bilirubin biology and kernicterus prevention; pulmonary physiology, pulmonary functions and neonatal ventilation.

  • Katherine Bianco, MD, FACOG;FACMG

    Katherine Bianco, MD, FACOG;FACMG

    Clinical Associate Professor, Obstetrics & Gynecology - Maternal Fetal Medicine

    Bio My clinical interest in pregnancies complicated with birth defects has led my underlying research interests in genomic abnormalities in the human trophoblast carrying to faulty placentation. The latter began with initial work during K12 and KO8 funding. I took a great interest in the human placenta as it carries potential advantages over other tissues sources: first, this highly metabolically active organ is the potential source of many transcripts. Second, the placenta forms at a very early stage of embryonic development, potentially allowing detection of primary alterations as compared to secondary changes that may mask the underlying causal phenomena. Finally, studying early placentation may provide targets for development of novel molecular approaches, such as up-regulate or down-regulate genes, the protein products of which could potentially serve as molecular surrogates for diagnosis and treatment of pregnancy complication such as miscarriages, pre-eclampsia, pregnancy induced hypertension and intrauterine growth retardation. This work has led to the first Trisomy 21, Trisomy 18, trisomy 13 cell lines established from human placentas making it possible to apply gene editing in the early stages of human trophoblast development.

    As my primary clinical responsibility involves treating patients needing medical care and support through their high risk pregnancies, I am interested in factors that may impact outcomes, such as prenatal screening and diagnosis, maternal heart conditions, labor and delivery management, and safety approaches for the second stage of labor. In investigating length of labor and approaches to shorten the second stage, I have found methods of improving perinatal outcomes in diverse maternal populations.

    With regards to my interest in fetal medicine, I have worked in collaboration with other specialists such as radiologists and pediatric cardiologists utilizing imagining studies to assess and determine successful perinatal care and fetal survival.

  • Rebecca Blankenburg, MD, MPH

    Rebecca Blankenburg, MD, MPH

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am interested in graduate medical education -- particularly in understanding how learners learn in the clinical environment, and how learners can optimally communicate with patients and families, to improve patient understanding, patient satisfaction, and patient safety. My current studies include: (1) Coaching Initiative; (2) Improving Family-Centered Rounds to Improve Safety and Communication, (3) Shared Decision-Making, and (4) Scholarly Concentrations.

  • Helen M. Blau

    Helen M. Blau

    The Donald E. and Delia B. Baxter Foundation Professor and Director, Baxter Laboratory for Stem Cell Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Prof. Helen Blau's research area is regenerative medicine with a focus on stem cells. Her research on nuclear reprogramming and demonstrating the plasticity of cell fate using cell fusion is well known and her laboratory has also pioneered the design of biomaterials to mimic the in vivo microenvironment and direct stem cell fate. Current findings are leading to more efficient iPS generation, cell based therapies by dedifferentiation a la newts, and discovery of novel molecules and therapies.

  • Catherine Blish

    Catherine Blish

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The major goal of our research is to gain insight into the prevention and control of HIV and other viral pathogens by studying the interplay between the virus and the host immune response. We investigate the role of various arms of the immune response, but with a particular focus on NK cells. We hope to gain additional insights into control of infectious diseases by studying how pregnancy modulates immune responses.

  • Yair Blumenfeld

    Yair Blumenfeld

    Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Maternal Fetal Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests prenatal diagnosis, genetics, clinical obstetrics

  • Paul D. Blumenthal, MD, MPH

    Paul D. Blumenthal, MD, MPH

    Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Gynecology-Family Planning) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Improving Access to Family Planning Services in Low Resource Settings:

    Through a collaboration with Population Services International, the Stanford Program for International Reproductive Education and Services (SPIRES) provides technical direction in a program designed to improve access to and uptake of family planning, particularly Long Acting Reversible Contraception (LARC) such as IUDs and implants, in 14 developing countries globally. The first year saw insertion of over 280,000 IUDs.

  • Cara Bohon

    Cara Bohon

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Development) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interests have focused on the neural bases of eating disorders and obesity. I am particularly interested in the way emotion and reward is processed in the brain and how that may contribute to eating behavior and food restriction. I hope to eventually translate biological research findings into treatments.

  • Paul Bollyky

    Paul Bollyky

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our lab studies how immune responses are regulated within chronically inflamed or infected tissues. In particular, we study how the extracellular matrix influences local immunity and why these responses are dysregulated in autoimmune diseases, poorly healing wounds, and chronic infections.
    We welcome research students with interests in immunology, structural biology, and microbiology.

  • C. Andrew Bonham

    C. Andrew Bonham

    Associate Professor of Surgery (Abdominal Transplantation) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Tolerance induction in liver transplantation.
    Hepatocyte transplantation.

  • John  Boothroyd

    John Boothroyd

    Burt and Marion Avery Professor of Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We are intereseted in the interaction between the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii and its mammalian host. We use a combination of molecular and genetic tools to understand how this obligate intracellular parasite can invade almost any cell it encounters, how it co-opts a host cell once inside and how it evades the immune response to produce a life-long, persistent infection.

  • Audrey (Ellerbee) Bowden

    Audrey (Ellerbee) Bowden

    Associate Professor, Electrical Engineering

    Bio Our lab seeks to develop and deploy novel tools for optical imaging and sensing at the microscale and nanoscale. Our work finds applications both in the clinic and for basic science research; we also have particular interest in the development of low-cost, portable technologies suited for use in poorly resourced environments.

  • Scott Boyd, MD PhD

    Scott Boyd, MD PhD

    Associate Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our goal is to understand the lymphocyte genotype-phenotype relationships in healthy human immunity and in immunological diseases. We apply new technologies and data analysis approaches to this challenge, particularly high-throughput DNA sequencing and single-cell monoclonal antibody generation, in parallel with other functional assays.

  • James D. Brooks

    James D. Brooks

    Keith and Jan Hurlbut Professor in the Stanford University School of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We use genomic approaches to identify disease biomarkers. We are most interested in translating biomarkers into clinical practice in urological diseases with a particular focus in cancer.

  • Jennifer Bruno

    Jennifer Bruno

    Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Bruno is a translational researcher at the interface of developmental cognitive neuropsychology and neurobiology. Her research is aimed at understanding the neural basis of intellectual and developmental disorders with goals of improving early diagnosis using biomarkers and designing and testing targeted interventions. Current research projects include longitudinal investigations of neurobiological and behavioral outcomes in Fragile X Syndrome and autism spectrum disorders. Dr. Bruno is also developing adaptable non-constraining functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) paradigms to assess the neural circuitry underlying cognition in healthy typically developing individuals and in individuals with neurodevelopmental disorders. Working towards the goal of informing the design of targeted treatments while providing important outcome and progress metrics, Dr. Bruno's research includes infant developmental studies to uncover early, objective biomarkers and epidemiological studies to investigate brain functioning correlates in populations.

  • Bruce Buckingham

    Bruce Buckingham

    Professor of Pediatrics (Endocrinology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My major interest is in type 1 diabetes mellitus, continuous glucose sensor, and the development of an artificial pancreas. Other research interests include using continuous glucose monitoring and algorithms to control blood glucose levels in intensive care units.

  • Carlos Bustamante

    Carlos Bustamante

    Professor of Biomedical Data Science, of Genetics and, by courtesy, of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research focuses on analyzing genome wide patterns of variation within and between species to address fundamental questions in biology, anthropology, and medicine. My group works on a variety of organisms and model systems ranging from humans and other primates to domesticated plant and animals. Much of our research is at the interface of computational biology, mathematical genetics, and evolutionary genomics.

  • Alexander Butwick

    Alexander Butwick

    Associate Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine (OB) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests As an NIH-funded clinician investigator, I am currently performing outcomes-based research in obstetrics investigating strategies to better prevent and treat patients with postpartum hemorrhage, a leading cause of maternal morbidity and mortality. I also have research interests in the use of point-of-care devices for investigating key changes in the maternal hematologic and hemostatic profiles that occur during the peripartum and postpartum periods.

  • Michele Calos

    Michele Calos

    Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My lab is developing innovative gene and stem cell therapies for genetic diseases, with a focus on gene therapy and regenerative medicine.

    We have created novel methods for inserting therapeutic genes into the chromosomes at specific places by using homologous recombination and recombinase enzymes.

    We are working on 3 forms of muscular dystrophy.

    We created induced pluripotent stem cells from patient fibroblasts, added therapeutic genes, differentiated, and engrafted the cells.

  • David Camarillo

    David Camarillo

    Assistant Professor of Bioengineering and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery and of Mechanical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Camarillo Lab is currently instrumenting Stanford athletes with inertial sensors to investigate the mechanism of concussion. Additionally, the lab is researching cell mechanics for regenerative medicine. We are developing a quantitative, noninvasive and early measure of viability in order to allow clinicians to transfer the single most viable embryo. Other research area is in medical instrumentation as it pertains to robotic catheterization for curing cardiac arrhythmia.

  • Jan Carette

    Jan Carette

    Assistant Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research focuses on the identification of host genes that play critical roles in the pathogenesis of infectious agents including viruses. We use haploid genetic screens in human cells as an efficient approach to perform loss-of-function studies. Besides obtaining fundamental insights on how viruses hijack cellular processes and on host defense mechanisms, it may also facilitate the development of new therapeutic strategies.

  • Suzan Carmichael

    Suzan Carmichael

    Professor (Research) of Pediatrics (Neonatology) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research focuses on epidemiologic studies related to maternal and child health. Current projects address congenital anomalies of craniofacial, urogenital, musculoskeletal and central nervous system structures and how they relate to genetics, nutrition, stress, and environmental contaminants. Physiologic pathways encompassed by these studies include one-carbon metabolism, oxidative stress, HPA axis activation, and sex steroid metabolism. In particular, we are interested in discovering how environmental factors and genetic susceptibility may interact to affect these pathways and impact risks of these outcomes. Other active projects include investigations into the etiology of preterm delivery and stillbirth, and factors affecting the care and outcomes of infants with birth defects.

  • Victor G. Carrion

    Victor G. Carrion

    John A. Turner Endowed Professor for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Examines the interplay between brain development and stress vulnerability via a multi-method approach that includes psychophysiology, neuroimaging, neuroendocrinology and phenomenology. Treatment development that focuses on individual and community-based interventions for stress related conditions in children and adolescents that experience traumatic stress.

  • Brendan Carvalho

    Brendan Carvalho

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine (Adult MSD) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My main research interest is in clinical and translational research related to cesarean delivery and labor analgesia as well as maternal-fetal pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics drug modeling.

  • Lisa J. Chamberlain

    Lisa J. Chamberlain

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (General Pediatrics) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Child Health disparities - Projects focus on elucidating the non-clinical factors that impact access to appropriate care for children with chronic illness.

    Health Policy - Projects explore the intersection of medicine as a profession and formation of child health policy.

  • Anne Lynn S. Chang, MD

    Anne Lynn S. Chang, MD

    Associate Professor of Dermatology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I have two main research interests:
    1) to better understand and treat patients with aggressive basal cell carcinomas
    2) to better understand the genetic and epigenetic mechanisms of healthy human skin aging and to translate these insights into better care of skin diseases enriched in older patients particularly skin cancer and rosacea

  • Howard Y. Chang, MD PhD

    Howard Y. Chang, MD PhD

    Virginia and D. K. Ludwig Professor of Cancer Genomics and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research is focused on how the activities of hundreds or even thousands of genes (gene parties) are coordinated to achieve biological meaning. We have pioneered methods to predict, dissect, and control large-scale gene regulatory programs; these methods have provided insights into human development, cancer, and aging.

  • Stephanie D. Chao, MD

    Stephanie D. Chao, MD

    Assistant Professor of Surgery (Pediatric Surgery) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Chao's research focuses on preventing surgical diseases minimizing the impact of surgery. She works with the Asian Liver Center towards the global eradication of hepatitis B, the leading cause of liver cancer and liver disease globally. Dr. Chao helped launch the Jade Ribbon Campaign in 2001 to improve public and physician awareness about hepatitis B. Dr. Chao also serves as the Trauma Medical Director of LPCH and is interested in preventing pediatric traumatic injuries.

  • Bertha Chen, MD

    Bertha Chen, MD

    Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Gynecology - Urogynecology) and, by courtesy, of Urology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Chen?s research examines the molecular causes of urinary incontinence and pelvic floor dysfunction. Recognizing that urinary incontinence linked to demise of smooth muscle sphincter function, she is investigating the potential use of stem cell regeneration to restore muscle capacity.

  • James K. Chen

    James K. Chen

    Professor of Chemical and Systems Biology and of Developmental Biology and, by courtesy, of Chemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory combines synthetic chemistry and developmental biology to investigate the molecular events that regulate embryonic patterning, tissue regeneration, and tumorigenesis. We are currently using genetic and small-molecule approaches to study the molecular mechanisms of Hedgehog signaling, and we are developing chemical technologies to perturb and observe the genetic programs that underlie vertebrate development.

  • Lu Chen

    Lu Chen

    Professor of Neurosurgery and of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests What distinguishes us humans from other animals is our ability to undergo complex behavior. The synapses are the structural connection between neurons that mediates the communication between neurons, which underlies our various cognitive function. My research program aims to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie synapse function during behavior in the developing and mature brain, and how synapse function is altered during mental retardation.

  • Alan G. Cheng

    Alan G. Cheng

    Associate Professor of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery (Pediatrics) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Active Wnt signaling maintains somatic stem cells in many organ systems. Using Wnt target genes as markers, we have characterized distinct cell populations with stem cell behavior in the inner ear, an organ thought to be terminally differentiated. Ongoing work focuses on delineating the developing significance of these putative stem/progenitor cells and their behavior after damage.

  • Thomas L. Cherpes

    Thomas L. Cherpes

    Assistant Professor of Comparative Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Conducts basic, translational, and clinical research exploring host defense against cancer and microbial pathogens. Specific focus on: 1) effects of exogenous sex steroids on basic mechanisms of anti-virus host defense; 2) role of Type 2 immunity as defense against Chlamydia trachomatis infection; and 3) developing cellular immunotherapies to combat infectious disease and cancer

  • Joseph Cheung, MD, MS

    Joseph Cheung, MD, MS

    Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine

    Bio Dr. Cheung received his Bachelor of Science (honors) in Biochemistry from the University of British Columbia. He then worked in Dr. Stephen Scherer?s laboratory at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto and was part of a team that completed the DNA sequence map and gene annotation of the human chromosome 7. He completed his medical degree and a Master of Science in Neuroscience at the Larner College of Medicine at the University of Vermont. Dr. Cheung performed his medical internship and residency training in neurology at Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine/Barnes-Jewish Hospital. During residency, received the inaugural Abdullah M. Nassief Award for his dedication in teaching, compassion and clinical service. He then completed a clinical fellowship in sleep medicine at Stanford University in 2014-2015. Dr. Cheung completed an NIH T32 postdoctoral research fellowship in 2015-2017 (adviser Dr. Emmanuel Mignot). He specializes in the treatment of sleep disorders, particularly in hypersomnia disorders where he founded and directs the Stanford Hypersomnia Clinic. He is a principal investigator of an NIH K23 award with a research focus on elucidating the neurobiological and genetic basis of hypersomnia disorders. Dr. Cheung is also investigating applications of wearable and other digital technologies to the study of sleep. He is particularly committed to teaching trainees and is actively involved in the Stanford sleep medicine fellowship.

  • Valerie Chock

    Valerie Chock

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Neonatology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Neurological monitoring in critically ill infants. Altered hemodynamics in neonates, especially in relation to prematurity, congenital heart disease, and central nervous system injury. Determination of the hemodynamic significance and effects of a patent ductus arteriosus in the preterm infant. Utilizing NIRS (near-infrared spectroscopy) and other technologies for improved monitoring in the NICU.

  • Gilbert Chu

    Gilbert Chu

    Professor of Medicine (Oncology) and of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory seeks to understand how cells repair DNA damage. We currently focus on how non-homologous end joining proteins assemble on DNA ends to juxtapose them for repair of DNA double-strand breaks.

    We are collaborating in the development of a point-of-care device to measure ammonia from a drop of blood. The device will facilitate diagnosis and management of urea cycle defects, liver disease, and chemobrain due to elevated ammonia.

  • Michael Cleary

    Michael Cleary

    Lindhard Family Professor in Pediatric Cancer Biology and Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The role of oncoproteins in cancer and development; molecular and cellular biology of hematologic malignancies; targeted molecular therapies of cancer.

  • Jennifer R. Cochran

    Jennifer R. Cochran

    Shriram Chair of Bioengineering, Associate Professor of Bioengineering and, by courtesy, of Chemical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Molecular Engineering, Protein Biochemistry, Biotechnology, Cell and Tissue Engineering, Molecular Imaging, Chemical Biology

  • Harvey Cohen

    Harvey Cohen

    Deborah E. Addicott - John A. Kriewall and Elizabeth A. Haehl Family Professor in Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interests extend from hypothesis-driven studies in biochemistry and cell biology to discovery-driven interests in proteomics and systems biology to clinical treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia of children, and pediatric palliative care.

  • Carol Conrad

    Carol Conrad

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Pulmonary Medicine) at Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am interested in studying the effects of inflammation in the lung, in particular, how N-acetylcysteine may affect and decrease that in CF patients. I am the PI of a multi-center study researching this question. Additionally, in a separate study involving children who have received lung transplants, I am a participating site in an NIH-sponsored observational and mechanistic multi-center study that will examine the role of viral infections in causing chronic graft rejection.

  • Christopher H. Contag

    Christopher H. Contag

    Professor of Pediatrics (Neonatology), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We develop and use the tools of molecular imaging to understand oncogenesis, reveal patterns of cell migration in immunosurveillance, monitor gene expression, visualize stem cell biology, and assess the distribution of pathogens in living animal models of human biology and disease. Biology doesn't occur in "a vacuum" or on coated plates--it occurs in the living body and that's were we look for biological patterns and responses to insult.

  • John P. Cooke, MD, PhD

    John P. Cooke, MD, PhD

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our translational research program in vascular regeneration is focused on generating and characterizing vascular cells from human induced pluripotential stem cells. We are also studying the therapeutic application of these cells in murine models of peripheral arterial disease. In these studies we leverage our longstanding interest in endothelial signaling, eg by nitric oxide synthase (NOS) as well as by nicotinic cholinergic receptors (nAChR).

  • David N. Cornfield

    David N. Cornfield

    Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor in Pediatric Pulmonary Medicine and Professor, by courtesy, of Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Over the past 20 years, the Cornfield Laboratory has focused upon basic, translational and clinical research, with a primary focus on lung biology. As an active clinician-scientist, delivering care to acutely and chronically ill infants and children, our lab focuses on significant clinical challenges and tried to use science to craft novel solutions to difficult clinical problems.

  • Helio Costa

    Helio Costa

    Instructor, Pathology

    Bio Helio Costa, PhD, is a geneticist with expertise in genomics, molecular biology, oncology, and bioinformatics. He is currently an Instructor within the Departments of Pathology and Biomedical Data Science at Stanford Medical School. Dr. Costa's research utilizes next-generation sequencing to develop new genome and transcriptome profiling methods with the goal of translating these tools to clinical diagnostic tests for implementation at Stanford Health Care. He is also an Attending Geneticist, and Assistant Lab Director of the Molecular Genetic Pathology Laboratory for Stanford Health Care. Dr. Costa received his BS in Genetics from University of California, Davis, his PhD in Genetics from Stanford University School of Medicine, and his ABMGG Clinical Molecular Genetics and Genomics fellowship training from Stanford University School of Medicine.

  • Tina Cowan

    Tina Cowan

    Professor of Pathology (Clinical) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests screening and diagnosis of patients with inborn errors of metabolism, including newborn screening, development of new testing methods and genotype/phenotype correlations.

  • Kenneth L. Cox

    Kenneth L. Cox

    Professor of Pediatrics (Gastroenterology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Gastroenterology, biliary motility, hormonal regulation, embryology, gastrointestinal tract, clinical management of pediatric liver transplant recipients.

Footer Links:

Stanford Medicine Resources: