School of Medicine


Showing 2,261-2,270 of 3,741 Results

  • Lynn Million

    Lynn Million

    Clinical Associate Professor, Radiation Oncology - Radiation Therapy

    Bio Lynn Million specializes in the treatment of cancer. She has practiced Radiation Oncology for more than 30 years. Dr. Million has a special interest in the treatment of sarcoma?s of soft tissue, bone and cartilage in children, young adolescents and adults.

  • Aaron D. Milstein

    Aaron D. Milstein

    Instructor, Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Aaron Milstein studies how dynamic synapses, neuronal cellular diversity, network connectivity, and plasticity mediate learning and memory. He trained with Roger Nicoll, Jeff Magee, and Sandro Romani, employing electrophysiology, optogenetics, pharmacology, and computational modeling to investigate information processing in neuronal circuits. Currently Aaron uses modern parallel computing methods to simulate spatial memory encoding in the hippocampus and its disfunction in epilepsy.

  • Arnold Milstein

    Arnold Milstein

    Professor of Medicine (General Medical Discipline)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Design and national demonstration of innovations in care delivery that provide more with less. Informed by research on AI-assisted clinical workflow, positive value outlier analysis and triggers of loss aversion bias among patients and clinicians.

    Research on creation of a national index of health system productivity gain.

  • Robert Mindelzun

    Robert Mindelzun

    Professor of Radiology at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Abdominal imaging,
    Anatomy.
    Mesenteries, peritoneum, omentum, pancreatic anatomy and embryology.
    Third World diseases.
    Abdominal trauma.

  • Adam S Miner Psy.D.

    Adam S Miner Psy.D.

    Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Miner is an AI psychologist, who uses experimental and observational studies to improve the ability to conversational artificial intelligence (AI) to recognize and respond to health issues. He completed a postdoctoral fellowship at Stanford's Clinical Excellence Research Center (CERC) before joining the Department of Psychiatry as an Instructor and being awarded a Mentored Career Development Award (KL2) through Spectrum and the NIH.

  • Lloyd B. Minor, MD

    Lloyd B. Minor, MD

    The Carl and Elizabeth Naumann Professorship for the Dean of the School of Medicine, Professor of Otolaryngology?Head & Neck Surgery and, by courtesy, of Neurobiology and Bioengineering

    Bio Lloyd B. Minor, MD, is a scientist, surgeon, and academic leader. He is the Carl and Elizabeth Naumann Dean of the Stanford University School of Medicine, a position he has held since December 2012.

    As dean, Dr. Minor plays an integral role in setting strategy for the clinical enterprise of Stanford Medicine, an academic medical center that includes the Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford Health Care, and Stanford Children?s Health and Lucile Packard Children?s Hospital Stanford. He also oversees the quality of Stanford Medicine?s physician practices and growing clinical networks.

    With Dr. Minor?s leadership, Stanford Medicine has established a strategic vision to lead the biomedical revolution in Precision Health. The next generation of health care, Precision Health is focused on keeping people healthy and providing care that is tailored to individual variations. It?s predictive, proactive, preemptive, personalized, and patient-centered.

    An advocate for innovation, Dr. Minor has provided significant support for fundamental science and for clinical and translational research at Stanford. Through bold initiatives in medical education and increased support for PhD students, Dr. Minor is committed to inspiring and training future leaders.

    Among other accomplishments Dr. Minor has led the development and implementation of an innovative model for cancer research and patient care delivery at Stanford Medicine and has launched an initiative in biomedical data science to harness the power of big data and create a learning health care system. Committed to diversity, he has increased student financial aid and expanded faculty leadership opportunities.

    Before coming to Stanford, Dr. Minor was provost and senior vice president for academic affairs of The Johns Hopkins University. During his time as provost, Dr. Minor launched many university-wide initiatives such as the Gateway Sciences Initiative to support pedagogical innovation, and the Doctor of Philosophy Board to promote excellence in PhD education. He worked with others around the university and health system to coordinate the Individualized Health Initiative, which aimed to use genetic information to transform health care.

    Prior to his appointment as provost in 2009, Dr. Minor served as the Andelot Professor and director (chair) of the Department of Otolaryngology?Head and Neck Surgery in the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and otolaryngologist-in-chief of The Johns Hopkins Hospital. During his six-year tenure, he expanded annual research funding by more than half and increased clinical activity by more than 30 percent, while strengthening teaching efforts and student training.

    With more than 140 published articles and chapters, Dr. Minor is an expert in balance and inner ear disorders. Through neurophysiological investigations of eye movements and neuronal pathways, his work has identified adaptive mechanisms responsible for compensation to vestibular injury in a model system for studies of motor learning (the vestibulo-ocular reflex). The synergies between this basic research and clinical studies have led to improved methods for the diagnosis and treatment of balance disorders. In recognition of his work in refining a treatment for Ménière?s disease, Dr. Minor received the Prosper Ménière Society?s gold medal in 2010.

    In the medical community, Dr. Minor is perhaps best known for his discovery of superior canal dehiscence syndrome, a debilitating disorder characterized by sound- or pressure-induced dizziness. In 1998 Dr. Minor and colleagues published a description of the clinical manifestations of the syndrome and related its cause to an opening (dehiscence) in the bone covering the superior canal. He subsequently developed a surgical procedure that corrects the problem and alleviates symptoms.

    In 2012, Dr. Minor was elected to the National Academy of Medicine, formerly the Institute of Medicine.

  • Tsuyoshi Mitarai, MD

    Tsuyoshi Mitarai, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Emergency Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Critical Care, optimal resource allocations for inpatient care

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