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  • PH.D., Peking University (2012)

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  • A computational model of induced pluripotent stem-cell derived cardiomyocytes incorporating experimental variability from multiple data sources. The Journal of physiology Kernik, D. C., Morotti, S., Wu, H., Garg, P., Duff, H. J., Kurokawa, J., Jalife, J., Wu, J. C., Grandi, E., Clancy, C. E. 2019

    Abstract

    KEY POINTS: Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs) capture patient-specific genotype-phenotype relationships, as well as cell-to-cell variability of cardiac electrical activity Computational modeling and simulation provide a high throughput approach to reconcile multiple datasets describing physiological variability, and identify vulnerable parameter regimes We have developed a whole-cell model of iPSC-CMs composed of single exponential voltage-dependent gating variable rate constants, parameterized to fit experimental iPSC-CM outputs We have utilized experimental data across multiple laboratories to model experimental variability and investigate subcellular phenotypic mechanisms in iPSC-CMs This framework links molecular mechanisms to cellular-level outputs by revealing unique subsets of model parameters linked to known iPSC-CM phenotypes ABSTRACT: There is a profound need to develop a strategy to predict patient-to-patient vulnerability in the emergence of cardiac arrhythmia. A promising in vitro method to address patient-specific proclivity to cardiac disease utilizes induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs). A major strength of this approach is that iPSC-CMs contain donor genetic information and therefore capture patient-specific genotype-phenotype relationships. A cited detriment of iPSC-CMs is the cell-to-cell variability observed in electrical activity. We postulated, however, that cell-to-cell variability may constitute a strength when appropriately utilized in a computational framework to build cell populations that can be employed to identify phenotypic mechanisms and pinpoint key sensitive parameters. Thus, we have exploited variation in experimental data across multiple laboratories to develop a computational framework to investigate subcellular phenotypic mechanisms. We have developed a whole-cell model of iPSC-CMs composed of simple model components comprising ion channel models with single exponential voltage-dependent gating variable rate constants, parameterized to fit experimental iPSC-CM data for all major ionic currents. By optimizing ionic current model parameters to multiple experimental datasets, we incorporate experimentally-observed variability in the ionic currents. The resulting population of cellular models predicts robust inter-subject variability in iPSC-CMs. This approach links molecular mechanisms to known cellular-level iPSC-CM phenotypes, as we show by comparing immature and mature subpopulations of models to analyse contributing factors underlying each phenotype. In the future, the models presented can be readily expanded to include genetic mutations and pharmacological interventions to study the mechanisms of rare events, such as arrhythmia triggers. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

    View details for DOI 10.1113/JP277724

    View details for PubMedID 31278749

  • RRAD mutation causes electrical and cytoskeletal defects in cardiomyocytes derived from a familial case of Brugada syndrome. European heart journal Belbachir, N., Portero, V., Al Sayed, Z. R., Gourraud, J., Dilasser, F., Jesel, L., Guo, H., Wu, H., Gaborit, N., Guilluy, C., Girardeau, A., Bonnaud, S., Simonet, F., Karakachoff, M., Pattier, S., Scott, C., Burel, S., Marionneau, C., Chariau, C., Gaignerie, A., David, L., Genin, E., Deleuze, J., Dina, C., Sauzeau, V., Loirand, G., Baro, I., Schott, J., Probst, V., Wu, J. C., Redon, R., Charpentier, F., Le Scouarnec, S. 2019

    Abstract

    AIMS: The Brugada syndrome (BrS) is an inherited cardiac disorder predisposing to ventricular arrhythmias. Despite considerable efforts, its genetic basis and cellular mechanisms remain largely unknown. The objective of this study was to identify a new susceptibility gene for BrS through familial investigation.METHODS AND RESULTS: Whole-exome sequencing performed in a three-generation pedigree with five affected members allowed the identification of one rare non-synonymous substitution (p.R211H) in RRAD, the gene encoding the RAD GTPase, carried by all affected members of the family. Three additional rare missense variants were found in 3/186 unrelated index cases. We detected higher levels of RRAD transcripts in subepicardium than in subendocardium in human heart, and in the right ventricle outflow tract compared to the other cardiac compartments in mice. The p.R211H variant was then subjected to electrophysiological and structural investigations in human cardiomyocytes derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC-CMs). Cardiomyocytes derived from induced pluripotent stem cells from two affected family members exhibited reduced action potential upstroke velocity, prolonged action potentials and increased incidence of early afterdepolarizations, with decreased Na+ peak current amplitude and increased Na+ persistent current amplitude, as well as abnormal distribution of actin and less focal adhesions, compared with intra-familial control iPSC-CMs Insertion of p.R211H-RRAD variant in control iPSCs by genome editing confirmed these results. In addition, iPSC-CMs from affected patients exhibited a decreased L-type Ca2+ current amplitude.CONCLUSION: This study identified a potential new BrS-susceptibility gene, RRAD. Cardiomyocytes derived from induced pluripotent stem cells expressing RRAD variant recapitulated single-cell electrophysiological features of BrS, including altered Na+ current, as well as cytoskeleton disturbances.

    View details for DOI 10.1093/eurheartj/ehz308

    View details for PubMedID 31114854

  • A Human iPSC Double-Reporter System Enables Purification of Cardiac Lineage Subpopulations with Distinct Function and Drug Response Profiles CELL STEM CELL Zhang, J. Z., Termglinchan, V., Shao, N., Itzhaki, I., Liu, C., Ma, N., Tian, L., Wang, V. Y., Chang, A. Y., Guo, H., Kitani, T., Wu, H., Lam, C., Kodo, K., Sayed, N., Blau, H. M., Wu, J. C. 2019; 24 (5): 802-+
  • An orange calcium-modulated bioluminescent indicator for non-invasive activity imaging NATURE CHEMICAL BIOLOGY Oh, Y., Park, Y., Cho, J. H., Wu, H., Paulk, N. K., Liu, L., Kim, N., Kay, M. A., Wu, J. C., Lin, M. Z. 2019; 15 (5): 433-+
  • An orange calcium-modulated bioluminescent indicator for non-invasive activity imaging. Nature chemical biology Oh, Y., Park, Y., Cho, J. H., Wu, H., Paulk, N. K., Liu, L. X., Kim, N., Kay, M. A., Wu, J. C., Lin, M. Z. 2019

    Abstract

    Fluorescent indicators are used widely to visualize calcium dynamics downstream of membrane depolarization or G-protein-coupled receptor activation, but are poorly suited for non-invasive imaging in mammals. Here, we report a bright calcium-modulated bioluminescent indicator named Orange CaMBI (Orange Calcium-modulated Bioluminescent Indicator). Orange CaMBI reports calcium dynamics in single cells and, in the context of a transgenic mouse, reveals calcium oscillations in whole organs in an entirely non-invasive manner.

    View details for PubMedID 30936501

  • A Human iPSC Double-Reporter System Enables Purification of Cardiac Lineage Subpopulations with Distinct Function and Drug Response Profiles. Cell stem cell Zhang, J. Z., Termglinchan, V., Shao, N., Itzhaki, I., Liu, C., Ma, N., Tian, L., Wang, V. Y., Chang, A. C., Guo, H., Kitani, T., Wu, H., Lam, C. K., Kodo, K., Sayed, N., Blau, H. M., Wu, J. C. 2019

    Abstract

    The diversity of cardiac lineages contributes to the heterogeneity of human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived cardiomyocytes (CMs). Here, we report the generation of a hiPSC TBX5Clover2 and NKX2-5TagRFP double reporter to delineate cardiaclineages and isolate lineage-specific subpopulations. Molecular analyses reveal that four different subpopulations can be isolated based on the differential expression of TBX5 and NKX2-5, TBX5+NKX2-5+, TBX5+NKX2-5-, TBX5-NKX2-5+, and TBX5-NKX2-5-, mimicking the first heart field, epicardial, second heart field, and endothelial lineages, respectively. Genetic and functional characterization indicates that each subpopulation differentiates into specific cardiac cells. We further identify CORIN as a cell-surface marker for isolating the TBX5+NKX2-5+ subpopulation and demonstrate the use of lineage-specific CMs for precise drug testing. We anticipate that this tool will facilitate theinvestigation of cardiac lineage specification and isolation of specific cardiac subpopulations for drug screening, tissue engineering, and disease modeling.

    View details for PubMedID 30880024

  • Modelling diastolic dysfunction in induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes from hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients. European heart journal Wu, H., Yang, H., Rhee, J. W., Zhang, J. Z., Lam, C. K., Sallam, K., Chang, A. C., Ma, N., Lee, J., Zhang, H., Blau, H. M., Bers, D. M., Wu, J. C. 2019

    Abstract

    Diastolic dysfunction (DD) is common among hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) patients, causing major morbidity and mortality. However, its cellular mechanisms are not fully understood, and presently there is no effective treatment. Patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs) hold great potential for investigating the mechanisms underlying DD in HCM and as a platform for drug discovery.In the present study, beating iPSC-CMs were generated from healthy controls and HCM patients with DD. Micropatterned iPSC-CMs from HCM patients showed impaired diastolic function, as evidenced by prolonged relaxation time, decreased relaxation rate, and shortened diastolic sarcomere length. Ratiometric Ca2+ imaging indicated elevated diastolic [Ca2+]i and abnormal Ca2+ handling in HCM iPSC-CMs, which were exacerbated by β-adrenergic challenge. Combining Ca2+ imaging and traction force microscopy, we observed enhanced myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity (measured as dF/Δ[Ca2+]i) in HCM iPSC-CMs. These results were confirmed with genome-edited isogenic iPSC lines that carry HCM mutations, indicating that cytosolic diastolic Ca2+ overload, slowed [Ca2+]i recycling, and increased myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity, collectively impairing the relaxation of HCM iPSC-CMs. Treatment with partial blockade of Ca2+ or late Na+ current reset diastolic Ca2+ homeostasis, restored diastolic function, and improved long-term survival, suggesting that disturbed Ca2+ signalling is an important cellular pathological mechanism of DD. Further investigation showed increased expression of L-type Ca2+channel (LTCC) and transient receptor potential cation channels (TRPC) in HCM iPSC-CMs compared with control iPSC-CMs, which likely contributed to diastolic [Ca2+]i overload.In summary, this study recapitulated DD in HCM at the single-cell level, and revealed novel cellular mechanisms and potential therapeutic targets of DD using iPSC-CMs.

    View details for DOI 10.1093/eurheartj/ehz326

    View details for PubMedID 31219556

  • Defining human cardiac transcription factor hierarchies using integrated single-cell heterogeneity analysis. Nature communications Churko, J. M., Garg, P., Treutlein, B., Venkatasubramanian, M., Wu, H., Lee, J., Wessells, Q. N., Chen, S., Chen, W., Chetal, K., Mantalas, G., Neff, N., Jabart, E., Sharma, A., Nolan, G. P., Salomonis, N., Wu, J. C. 2018; 9 (1): 4906

    Abstract

    Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs) have become a powerful tool for human disease modeling and therapeutic testing. However, their use remains limited by their immaturity and heterogeneity. To characterize the source of this heterogeneity, we applied complementary single-cell RNA-seq and bulk RNA-seq technologies over time during hiPSC cardiac differentiation and in the adult heart. Using integrated transcriptomic and splicing analysis, more than half a dozen distinct single-cell populations were observed, several of which were coincident at a single time-point, day 30 of differentiation. To dissect the role of distinct cardiac transcriptional regulators associated with each cell population, we systematically tested the effect ofa gain orloss of three transcription factors (NR2F2, TBX5, and HEY2), using CRISPR genome editing and ChIP-seq, in conjunction with patch clamp, calcium imaging, and CyTOF analysis. These targets, data, and integrative genomics analysis methods provide a powerful platform for understanding in vitro cellular heterogeneity.

    View details for PubMedID 30464173

  • Inhibition of TRPC1 prevents cardiac hypertrophy via NF-kappaB signaling pathway in human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes. Journal of molecular and cellular cardiology Tang, L., Yao, F., Wang, H., Wang, X., Shen, J., Dai, B., Wu, H., Zhou, D., Guo, F., Wang, J., Li, T., Wang, H., Gong, T., Su, J., Wang, L., Liang, P. 2018

    Abstract

    Cardiac hypertrophy is an adaptive response against increased workload featuring by an increase in left ventricular mass and a thickening left ventricle wall. Here, we showed the expression of transient receptor potential canonical 1 (TRPC1) is higher in hearts of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) or heart failure (HF) than that of normal hearts. To better understand the mechanisms of TRPC1 in regulating cellular hypertrophy of human-based cardiomyocytes, we generated human pluripotent stem cell lines of TRPC1 knockout by CRISPR/Cas9. We demonstrated that knockout of TRPC1 significantly attenuated cardiomyocyte hypertrophy phenotype induced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, which was associated with abnormal activation of NF-kappaB. In contrast, overexpression of TRPC1 induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, which can be reversed by inhibition of NF-kappaB. Taken together, we established a stable human-based cardiomyocyte hypertrophy model and highlighted molecular mechanisms underlying TRPC1-mediated hypertrophy, aiding the development of therapeutic drugs for HCM and HF by targeting TRPC1.

    View details for PubMedID 30423318

  • Identifying the Novel Role of a Presenilin-2 Mutation in Arrhythmogenicity using Patient Specific Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Derived Cardiomyocytes Lam, C., Ma, N., Rhee, J., Kitani, T., Zhang, J., Shrestha, R., Wu, H., Wu, J. C. ELSEVIER SCI LTD. 2018: 109
  • Determining the Pathogenicity of a Genomic Variant of Uncertain Significance Using CRISPR/Cas9 and Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells. Circulation Ma, N., Zhang, J., Itzhaki, I., Zhang, S. L., Chen, H., Haddad, F., Kitani, T., Wilson, K. D., Tian, L., Shrestha, R., Wu, H., Lam, C. K., Sayed, N., Wu, J. C. 2018

    Abstract

    Background -The progression toward low-cost and rapid next-generation sequencing has uncovered a multitude of variants of uncertain significance (VUS) in both patients and asymptomatic "healthy" individuals. A VUS is a rare or novel variant for which disease pathogenicity has not been conclusively demonstrated or excluded, and thus cannot be definitively annotated. VUS, therefore, pose critical clinical interpretation and risk-assessment challenges, and new methods are urgently needed to better characterize their pathogenicity. Methods -To address this challenge and showcase the uncertainty surrounding genomic variant interpretation, we recruited a "healthy" asymptomatic individual, lacking cardiac-disease clinical history, carrying a hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM)-associated genetic variant (NM_000258.2:c.170C>A, NP_000249.1:p.Ala57Asp) in the sarcomeric gene MYL3, reported by the ClinVar database to be "likely pathogenic." Humaninduced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were derived from the heterozygous VUSMYL3(170C>A) carrier, and their genome was edited using CRISPR/Cas9 to generate 4 isogenic iPSC lines: (1) corrected "healthy" control; (2) homozygous VUSMYL3(170C>A); (3) heterozygous frameshift mutation MYL3(170C>A/fs); and (4) known heterozygous MYL3 pathogenic mutation (NM_000258.2:c.170C>G), at the same nucleotide position as VUSMYL3(170C>A), lines. Extensive assays including measurements of gene expression, sarcomere structure, cell size, contractility, action potentials, and calcium handling were performed on the isogenic iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs). Results -The heterozygous VUSMYL3(170C>A)-iPSC-CMs did not show an HCM phenotype at the gene expression, morphology, or functional levels. Furthermore, genome-edited homozygous VUSMYL3(170C>A)- and frameshift mutation MYL3(170C>A/fs)-iPSC-CMs lines were also asymptomatic, supporting a benign assessment for this particular MYL3 variant. Further assessment of the pathogenic nature of a genome-edited isogenic line carrying a known pathogenic MYL3 mutation, MYL3(170C>G), and a carrier-specific iPSC-CMs line, carrying a MYBPC3(961G>A) HCM variant, demonstrated the ability of this combined platform to provide both pathogenic and benign assessments. Conclusions -Our study illustrates the ability of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/Cas9 genome-editing of carrier-specific iPSCs to elucidate both benign and pathogenic HCM functional phenotypes in a carrierspecific manner in a dish. As such, this platform represents a promising VUS riskassessment tool that can be used for assessing HCM-associated VUS specifically, and VUS in general, and thus significantly contribute to the arsenal of precision medicine tools available in this emerging field.

    View details for PubMedID 29914921

  • SETD7 Drives Cardiac Lineage Commitment through Stage-Specific Transcriptional Activation. Cell stem cell Lee, J., Shao, N. Y., Paik, D. T., Wu, H., Guo, H., Termglinchan, V., Churko, J. M., Kim, Y., Kitani, T., Zhao, M. T., Zhang, Y., Wilson, K. D., Karakikes, I., Snyder, M. P., Wu, J. C. 2018; 22 (3): 428–44.e5

    Abstract

    Cardiac development requires coordinated and large-scale rearrangements of the epigenome. The roles and precise mechanisms through which specific epigenetic modifying enzymes control cardiac lineage specification, however, remain unclear. Here we show that the H3K4 methyltransferase SETD7 controls cardiac differentiation by reading H3K36 marks independently of its enzymatic activity. Through chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq), we found that SETD7 targets distinct sets of genes to drive their stage-specific expression during cardiomyocyte differentiation. SETD7 associates with different co-factors at these stages, including SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling factors during mesodermal formation and the transcription factor NKX2.5 in cardiac progenitors to drive their differentiation. Further analyses revealed that SETD7 binds methylated H3K36 in the bodies of its target genes to facilitate RNA polymerase II (Pol II)-dependent transcription. Moreover, abnormal SETD7 expression impairs functional attributes of terminally differentiated cardiomyocytes. Together, these results reveal how SETD7 acts at sequential steps in cardiac lineage commitment, and they provide insights into crosstalk between dynamic epigenetic marks and chromatin-modifying enzymes.

    View details for PubMedID 29499155

  • Bioacoustic-enabled patterning of human iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes into 3D cardiac tissue BIOMATERIALS Serpooshan, V., Chen, P., Wu, H., Lee, S., Sharma, A., Hu, D. A., Venkatraman, S., Ganesan, A. V., Usta, O. B., Yarmush, M., Yang, F., Wu, J. C., Demirci, U., Wu, S. M. 2017; 131: 47-57

    Abstract

    The creation of physiologically-relevant human cardiac tissue with defined cell structure and function is essential for a wide variety of therapeutic, diagnostic, and drug screening applications. Here we report a new scalable method using Faraday waves to enable rapid aggregation of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs) into predefined 3D constructs. At packing densities that approximate native myocardium (10(8)-10(9) cells/ml), these hiPSC-CM-derived 3D tissues demonstrate significantly improved cell viability, metabolic activity, and intercellular connection when compared to constructs with random cell distribution. Moreover, the patterned hiPSC-CMs within the constructs exhibit significantly greater levels of contractile stress, beat frequency, and contraction-relaxation rates, suggesting their improved maturation. Our results demonstrate a novel application of Faraday waves to create stem cell-derived 3D cardiac tissue that resembles the cellular architecture of a native heart tissue for diverse basic research and clinical applications.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.biomaterials.2017.03.037

    View details for PubMedID 28376365

  • Human AML-iPSCs Reacquire Leukemic Properties after Differentiation and Model Clonal Variation of Disease. Cell stem cell Chao, M. P., Gentles, A. J., Chatterjee, S., Lan, F., Reinisch, A., Corces, M. R., Xavy, S., Shen, J., Haag, D., Chanda, S., Sinha, R., Morganti, R. M., Nishimura, T., Ameen, M., Wu, H., Wernig, M., Wu, J. C., Majeti, R. 2017; 20 (3): 329-344 e7

    Abstract

    Understanding the relative contributions of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) should assist integrated design of targeted therapies. In this study, we generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from AML patient samples harboring MLL rearrangements and found that they retained leukemic mutations but reset leukemic DNA methylation/gene expression patterns. AML-iPSCs lacked leukemic potential, but when differentiated into hematopoietic cells, they reacquired the ability to give rise to leukemia in vivo and reestablished leukemic DNA methylation/gene expression patterns, including an aberrant MLL signature. Epigenetic reprogramming was therefore not sufficient to eliminate leukemic behavior. This approach also allowed us to study the properties of distinct AML subclones, including differential drug susceptibilities of KRAS mutant and wild-type cells, and predict relapse based on increased cytarabine resistance of a KRAS wild-type subclone. Overall, our findings illustrate the value of AML-iPSCs for investigating the mechanistic basis and clonal properties of human AML.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.stem.2016.11.018

    View details for PubMedID 28089908

  • A Comprehensive TALEN-Based Knockout Library for Generating Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Based Models for Cardiovascular Diseases. Circulation research Karakikes, I., Termglinchan, V., Cepeda, D. A., Lee, J., Diecke, S., Hendel, A., Itzhaki, I., Ameen, M., Shrestha, R., Wu, H., Ma, N., Shao, N., Seeger, T., Woo, N. A., Wilson, K. D., Matsa, E., Porteus, M. H., Sebastiano, V., Wu, J. C. 2017

    Abstract

    Targeted genetic engineering using programmable nucleases such as transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) is a valuable tool for precise, site-specific genetic modification in the human genome.The emergence of novel technologies such as human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and nuclease-mediated genome editing represent a unique opportunity for studying cardiovascular diseases in vitro.By incorporating extensive literature and database searches, we designed a collection of TALEN constructs to knockout 88 human genes that are associated with cardiomyopathies and congenital heart diseases. The TALEN pairs were designed to induce double-strand DNA break near the starting codon of each gene that either disrupted the start codon or introduced a frameshift mutation in the early coding region, ensuring faithful gene knockout. We observed that all the constructs were active and disrupted the target locus at high frequencies. To illustrate the utility of the TALEN-mediated knockout technique, 6 individual genes (TNNT2, LMNA/C, TBX5, MYH7, ANKRD1, and NKX2.5) were knocked out with high efficiency and specificity in human iPSCs. By selectively targeting a pathogenic mutation (TNNT2 p.R173W) in patient-specific iPSC-derived cardiac myocytes, we demonstrated that the knockout strategy ameliorates the dilated cardiomyopathy phenotype in vitro. In addition, we modeled the Holt-Oram syndrome in iPSC-cardiac myocytes in vitro and uncovered novel pathways regulated by TBX5 in human cardiac myocyte development.Collectively, our study illustrates the powerful combination of iPSCs and genome editing technologies for understanding the biological function of genes, and the pathological significance of genetic variants in human cardiovascular diseases. The methods, strategies, constructs, and iPSC lines developed in this study provide a validated, readily available resource for cardiovascular research.

    View details for DOI 10.1161/CIRCRESAHA.116.309948

    View details for PubMedID 28246128

  • High-throughput screening of tyrosine kinase inhibitor cardiotoxicity with human induced pluripotent stem cells. Science translational medicine Sharma, A., Burridge, P. W., McKeithan, W. L., Serrano, R., Shukla, P., Sayed, N., Churko, J. M., Kitani, T., Wu, H., Holmström, A., Matsa, E., Zhang, Y., Kumar, A., Fan, A. C., Del Álamo, J. C., Wu, S. M., Moslehi, J. J., Mercola, M., Wu, J. C. 2017; 9 (377)

    Abstract

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), despite their efficacy as anticancer therapeutics, are associated with cardiovascular side effects ranging from induced arrhythmias to heart failure. We used human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs), generated from 11 healthy individuals and 2 patients receiving cancer treatment, to screen U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved TKIs for cardiotoxicities by measuring alterations in cardiomyocyte viability, contractility, electrophysiology, calcium handling, and signaling. With these data, we generated a "cardiac safety index" to reflect the cardiotoxicities of existing TKIs. TKIs with low cardiac safety indices exhibit cardiotoxicity in patients. We also derived endothelial cells (hiPSC-ECs) and cardiac fibroblasts (hiPSC-CFs) to examine cell type-specific cardiotoxicities. Using high-throughput screening, we determined that vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2)/platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR)-inhibiting TKIs caused cardiotoxicity in hiPSC-CMs, hiPSC-ECs, and hiPSC-CFs. With phosphoprotein analysis, we determined that VEGFR2/PDGFR-inhibiting TKIs led to a compensatory increase in cardioprotective insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling in hiPSC-CMs. Up-regulating cardioprotective signaling with exogenous insulin or IGF1 improved hiPSC-CM viability during cotreatment with cardiotoxic VEGFR2/PDGFR-inhibiting TKIs. Thus, hiPSC-CMs can be used to screen for cardiovascular toxicities associated with anticancer TKIs, and the results correlate with clinical phenotypes. This approach provides unexpected insights, as illustrated by our finding that toxicity can be alleviated via cardioprotective insulin/IGF signaling.

    View details for DOI 10.1126/scitranslmed.aaf2584

    View details for PubMedID 28202772

  • Comparison of Non-Coding RNAs in Exosomes and Functional Efficacy of Human Embryonic Stem Cell- Versus Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes. Stem cells (Dayton, Ohio) Lee, W. H., Chen, W., Shao, N. Y., Xiao, D., Qin, X., Baker, N., Bae, H. R., Shukla, P., Wu, H., Kodo, K., Ong, S. G., Wu, J. C. 2017

    Abstract

    Both human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (ESC-CMs) and human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs) can serve as unlimited cell sources for cardiac regenerative therapy. However, the functional equivalency between human ESC-CMs and iPSC-CMs for cardiac regenerative therapy has not been demonstrated. Here we performed a head-to-head comparison of ESC-CMs and iPSC-CMs in their ability to restore cardiac function in a rat myocardial infarction (MI) model as well as their exosomal secretome.Human ESCs and iPSCs were differentiated into cardiomyocytes using small molecule inhibitors. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis confirmed ∼85% and ∼83% of CMs differentiated from ESCs and iPSCs, respectively, were positive for cardiac troponin T. At a single-cell level, both cell types displayed similar calcium handling and electrophysiological properties, with gene expression comparable to the human fetal heart marked by striated sarcomeres. Sub-acute transplantation of ESC-CMs and iPSC-CMs into nude rats post-MI improved cardiac function, which was associated with increased expression of angiogenic genes in vitro following hypoxia. Profiling of exosomal microRNAs (miRs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) revealed that both groups contain an identical repertoire of miRs and lncRNAs, including some that are known to be cardioprotective.We demonstrate for the first time that both ESC-CMs and iPSC-CMs can facilitate comparable cardiac repair. This is advantageous because unlike allogeneic ESC-CMs used in therapy, autologous iPSC-CMs could potentially avoid immune rejection when used for cardiac cell transplantation in the future. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

    View details for PubMedID 28710827

  • Fast two-photon imaging of subcellular voltage dynamics in neuronal tissue with genetically encoded indicators. eLife Chamberland, S., Yang, H. H., Pan, M. M., Evans, S. W., Guan, S., Chavarha, M., Yang, Y., Salesse, C., Wu, H., Wu, J. C., Clandinin, T. R., Toth, K., Lin, M. Z., St-Pierre, F. 2017; 6

    Abstract

    Monitoring voltage dynamics in defined neurons deep in the brain is critical for unraveling the function of neuronal circuits but is challenging due to the limited performance of existing tools. In particular, while genetically encoded voltage indicators have shown promise for optical detection of voltage transients, many indicators exhibit low sensitivity when imaged under two-photon illumination. Previous studies thus fell short of visualizing voltage dynamics in individual neurons in single trials. Here, we report ASAP2s, a novel voltage indicator with improved sensitivity. By imaging ASAP2s using random-access multi-photon microscopy, we demonstrate robust single-trial detection of action potentials in organotypic slice cultures. We also show that ASAP2s enables two-photon imaging of graded potentials in organotypic slice cultures and inDrosophila. These results demonstrate that the combination of ASAP2s and fast two-photon imaging methods enables detection of neural electrical activity with subcellular spatial resolution and millisecond-timescale precision.

    View details for PubMedID 28749338

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC5584994

  • Photoacoustic Imaging of Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes in Living Hearts with Ultrasensitive Semiconducting Polymer Nanoparticles Advanced Functional Materials Qin, X., Chen, H., Yang, H., Wu, H., Zhao, X., Wang, H., Chour, T., Neofytou, E., Ding, D., Daldrup-Link, H., Heilshorn, S. C., Li, K., Wu, J. C. 2017

    View details for DOI 10.1002/adfm.201704939

  • Patient-Specific and Genome-Edited Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes Elucidate Single-Cell Phenotype of Brugada Syndrome. Journal of the American College of Cardiology Liang, P., Sallam, K., Wu, H., Li, Y., Itzhaki, I., Garg, P., Zhang, Y., Vermglinchan, V., Lan, F., Gu, M., Gong, T., Zhuge, Y., He, C., Ebert, A. D., Sanchez-Freire, V., Churko, J., Hu, S., Sharma, A., Lam, C. K., Scheinman, M. M., Bers, D. M., Wu, J. C. 2016; 68 (19): 2086-2096

    Abstract

    Brugada syndrome (BrS), a disorder associated with characteristic electrocardiogram precordial ST-segment elevation, predisposes afflicted patients to ventricular fibrillation and sudden cardiac death. Despite marked achievements in outlining the organ level pathophysiology of the disorder, the understanding of human cellular phenotype has lagged due to a lack of adequate human cellular models of the disorder.The objective of this study was to examine single cell mechanism of Brugada syndrome using induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs).This study recruited 2 patients with type 1 BrS carrying 2 different sodium voltage-gated channel alpha subunit 5 variants as well as 2 healthy control subjects. We generated iPSCs from their skin fibroblasts by using integration-free Sendai virus. We used directed differentiation to create purified populations of iPSC-CMs.BrS iPSC-CMs showed reductions in inward sodium current density and reduced maximal upstroke velocity of action potential compared with healthy control iPSC-CMs. Furthermore, BrS iPSC-CMs demonstrated increased burden of triggered activity, abnormal calcium (Ca(2+)) transients, and beating interval variation. Correction of the causative variant by genome editing was performed, and resultant iPSC-CMs showed resolution of triggered activity and abnormal Ca(2+) transients. Gene expression profiling of iPSC-CMs showed clustering of BrS compared with control subjects. Furthermore, BrS iPSC-CM gene expression correlated with gene expression from BrS human cardiac tissue gene expression.Patient-specific iPSC-CMs were able to recapitulate single-cell phenotype features of BrS, including blunted inward sodium current, increased triggered activity, and abnormal Ca(2+) handling. This novel human cellular model creates future opportunities to further elucidate the cellular disease mechanism and identify novel therapeutic targets.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jacc.2016.07.779

    View details for PubMedID 27810048

  • Transcriptome Profiling of Patient-Specific Human iPSC-Cardiomyocytes Predicts Individual Drug Safety and Efficacy Responses In Vitro. Cell stem cell Matsa, E., Burridge, P. W., Yu, K., Ahrens, J. H., Termglinchan, V., Wu, H., Liu, C., Shukla, P., Sayed, N., Churko, J. M., Shao, N., Woo, N. A., Chao, A. S., Gold, J. D., Karakikes, I., Snyder, M. P., Wu, J. C. 2016; 19 (3): 311-325

    Abstract

    Understanding individual susceptibility to drug-induced cardiotoxicity is key to improving patient safety and preventing drug attrition. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) enable the study of pharmacological and toxicological responses in patient-specific cardiomyocytes (CMs) and may serve as preclinical platforms for precision medicine. Transcriptome profiling in hiPSC-CMs from seven individuals lacking known cardiovascular disease-associated mutations and in three isogenic human heart tissue and hiPSC-CM pairs showed greater inter-patient variation than intra-patient variation, verifying that reprogramming and differentiation preserve patient-specific gene expression, particularly in metabolic and stress-response genes. Transcriptome-based toxicology analysis predicted and risk-stratified patient-specific susceptibility to cardiotoxicity, and functional assays in hiPSC-CMs using tacrolimus and rosiglitazone, drugs targeting pathways predicted to produce cardiotoxicity, validated inter-patient differential responses. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated pathway correction prevented drug-induced cardiotoxicity. Our data suggest that hiPSC-CMs can be used in vitro to predict and validate patient-specific drug safety and efficacy, potentially enabling future clinical approaches to precision medicine.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.stem.2016.07.006

    View details for PubMedID 27545504

  • A Tension-Based Model Distinguishes Hypertrophic versus Dilated Cardiomyopathy CELL Davis, J., Davis, L. C., Correll, R. N., Makarewich, C. A., Schwanekamp, J. A., Moussavi-Harami, F., Wang, D., York, A. J., Wu, H., Houser, S. R., Seidman, C. E., Seidman, J. G., Regnier, M., Metzger, J. M., Wu, J. C., Molkentin, J. D. 2016; 165 (5): 1147-1159

    Abstract

    The heart either hypertrophies or dilates in response to familial mutations in genes encoding sarcomeric proteins, which are responsible for contraction and pumping. These mutations typically alter calcium-dependent tension generation within the sarcomeres, but how this translates into the spectrum of hypertrophic versus dilated cardiomyopathy is unknown. By generating a series of cardiac-specific mouse models that permit the systematic tuning of sarcomeric tension generation and calcium fluxing, we identify a significant relationship between the magnitude of tension developed over time and heart growth. When formulated into a computational model, the integral of myofilament tension development predicts hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies in mice associated with essentially any sarcomeric gene mutations, but also accurately predicts human cardiac phenotypes from data generated in induced-pluripotent-stem-cell-derived myocytes from familial cardiomyopathy patients. This tension-based model also has the potential to inform pharmacologic treatment options in cardiomyopathy patients.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.cell.2016.04.002

    View details for PubMedID 27114035

  • Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes recapitulate the predilection of breast cancer patients to doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity NATURE MEDICINE Burridge, P. W., Li, Y. F., Matsa, E., Wu, H., Ong, S., Sharma, A., Holmstrom, A., Chang, A. C., Coronado, M. J., Ebert, A. D., Knowles, J. W., Telli, M. L., Witteles, R. M., Blau, H. M., Bernstein, D., Altman, R. B., Wu, J. C. 2016; 22 (5): 547-556

    Abstract

    Doxorubicin is an anthracycline chemotherapy agent effective in treating a wide range of malignancies, but it causes a dose-related cardiotoxicity that can lead to heart failure in a subset of patients. At present, it is not possible to predict which patients will be affected by doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity (DIC). Here we demonstrate that patient-specific human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs) can recapitulate the predilection to DIC of individual patients at the cellular level. hiPSC-CMs derived from individuals with breast cancer who experienced DIC were consistently more sensitive to doxorubicin toxicity than hiPSC-CMs from patients who did not experience DIC, with decreased cell viability, impaired mitochondrial and metabolic function, impaired calcium handling, decreased antioxidant pathway activity, and increased reactive oxygen species production. Taken together, our data indicate that hiPSC-CMs are a suitable platform to identify and characterize the genetic basis and molecular mechanisms of DIC.

    View details for DOI 10.1038/nm.4087

    View details for PubMedID 27089514

  • Systematic Characterization of Long Noncoding RNAs Reveals the Contrasting Coordination of Cis- and Trans-Molecular Regulation in Human Fetal and Adult Hearts CIRCULATION-CARDIOVASCULAR GENETICS He, C., Hu, H., Wilson, K. D., Wu, H., Feng, J., Xia, S., Churko, J., Qu, K., Chang, H. Y., Wu, J. C. 2016; 9 (2): 110-118

    Abstract

    -The molecular regulation of heart development is regulated by cis- and trans- factors acting on the genome and epigenome. As a class of important regulatory RNAs, the role of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in human heart development is still poorly understood. Furthermore, factors that interact with lncRNAs in this process are not well characterized.-Utilizing RNA sequencing, we systematically define the contrasting lncRNA expression patterns between fetal and adult heart. We report that lncRNAs up-regulated in adult versus fetal heart have different sequence features and distributions. For example, the adult heart expresses more sense lncRNAs compared to fetal heart. We also report the co-expression of lncRNAs and neighboring coding genes that have important functions in heart development. Importantly, the regulation of lncRNA expression during fetal to adult heart development appears to be due in part to the coordination of specific developmental epigenetic modifications such as H3K4me1 and H3k4me3. The expression of promoter-associated lncRNAs in adult and fetal heart also appears to be related to these epigenetic states. Finally, transcription factor binding analysis suggests that lncRNAs are directly regulating cardiac gene expression during development.-We provide a systematic analysis of lncRNA control of heart development that gives clues to the roles that specific lncRNAs play in fetal and adult hearts.

    View details for DOI 10.1161/CIRCGENETICS.115.001264

    View details for PubMedID 26896382

  • Modeling Cardiovascular Diseases with Patient-Specific Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes. Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.) Burridge, P. W., Diecke, S., Matsa, E., Sharma, A., Wu, H., Wu, J. C. 2016; 1353: 119-130

    Abstract

    The generation of cardiomyocytes from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) provides a source of cells that accurately recapitulate the human cardiac pathophysiology. The application of these cells allows for modeling of cardiovascular diseases, providing a novel understanding of human disease mechanisms and assessment of therapies. Here, we describe a stepwise protocol developed in our laboratory for the generation of hiPSCs from patients with a specific disease phenotype, long-term hiPSC culture and cryopreservation, differentiation of hiPSCs to cardiomyocytes, and assessment of disease phenotypes. Our protocol combines a number of innovative tools that include a codon-optimized mini intronic plasmid (CoMiP), chemically defined culture conditions to achieve high efficiencies of reprogramming and differentiation, and calcium imaging for assessment of cardiomyocyte phenotypes. Thus, this protocol provides a complete guide to use a patient cohort on a testable cardiomyocyte platform for pharmacological drug assessment.

    View details for DOI 10.1007/7651_2015_196

    View details for PubMedID 25690476

  • Generation of Functional Cardiomyocytes from the Synoviocytes of Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis via Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells. Scientific reports Lee, J., Jung, S. M., Ebert, A. D., Wu, H., Diecke, S., Kim, Y., Yi, H., Park, S., Ju, J. H. 2016; 6: 32669-?

    Abstract

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of morbidity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. This study aimed to generate and characterise cardiomyocytes from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) of RA patients. Fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs) from patients with RA and osteoarthritis (OA) were successfully reprogrammed into RA-iPSCs and OA-iPSCs, respectively. The pluripotency of iPSCs was confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunofluorescence staining. Established iPSCs were differentiated into cardiomyocytes using a small molecule-based monolayer differentiation protocol. Within 12 days of cardiac differentiation from patient-specific and control-iPSCs, spontaneously beating cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs) were observed. All iPSC-CMs exhibited a reliable sarcomeric structure stained with antibodies against cardiac markers and similar expression profiles of cardiac-specific genes. Intracellular calcium signalling was recorded to compare calcium-handling properties among cardiomyocytes differentiated from the three groups of iPSCs. RA-iPSC-CMs had a lower amplitude and a shorter duration of calcium transients than the control groups. Peak tangential stress and the maximum contractile rate were also decreased in RA-iPSC-CMs, suggesting that contractility was reduced. This study demonstrates the successful generation of functional cardiomyocytes from pathogenic synovial cells in RA patients through iPSC reprogramming. Research using RA-iPSC-CMs might provide an opportunity to investigate the pathophysiology of cardiac involvement in RA.

    View details for DOI 10.1038/srep32669

    View details for PubMedID 27609119

  • Epigenetic Regulation of Phosphodiesterases 2A and 3A Underlies Compromised ß-Adrenergic Signaling in an iPSC Model of Dilated Cardiomyopathy. Cell stem cell Wu, H., Lee, J., Vincent, L. G., Wang, Q., Gu, M., Lan, F., Churko, J. M., Sallam, K. I., Matsa, E., Sharma, A., Gold, J. D., Engler, A. J., Xiang, Y. K., Bers, D. M., Wu, J. C. 2015; 17 (1): 89-100

    Abstract

    β-adrenergic signaling pathways mediate key aspects of cardiac function. Its dysregulation is associated with a range of cardiac diseases, including dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Previously, we established an iPSC model of familial DCM from patients with a mutation in TNNT2, a sarcomeric protein. Here, we found that the β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol induced mature β-adrenergic signaling in iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs) but that this pathway was blunted in DCM iPSC-CMs. Although expression levels of several β-adrenergic signaling components were unaltered between control and DCM iPSC-CMs, we found that phosphodiesterases (PDEs) 2A and PDE3A were upregulated in DCM iPSC-CMs and that PDE2A was also upregulated in DCM patient tissue. We further discovered increased nuclear localization of mutant TNNT2 and epigenetic modifications of PDE genes in both DCM iPSC-CMs and patient tissue. Notably, pharmacologic inhibition of PDE2A and PDE3A restored cAMP levels and ameliorated the impaired β-adrenergic signaling of DCM iPSC-CMs, suggesting therapeutic potential.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.stem.2015.04.020

    View details for PubMedID 26095046

  • Pravastatin reverses obesity-induced dysfunction of induced pluripotent stem cell-derived endothelial cells via a nitric oxide-dependent mechanism. European heart journal Gu, M., Mordwinkin, N. M., Kooreman, N. G., Lee, J., Wu, H., Hu, S., Churko, J. M., Diecke, S., Burridge, P. W., He, C., Barron, F. E., Ong, S., Gold, J. D., Wu, J. C. 2015; 36 (13): 806-816

    Abstract

    High-fat diet-induced obesity (DIO) is a major contributor to type II diabetes and micro- and macro-vascular complications leading to peripheral vascular disease (PVD). Metabolic abnormalities of induced pluripotent stem cell-derived endothelial cells (iPSC-ECs) from obese individuals could potentially limit their therapeutic efficacy for PVD. The aim of this study was to compare the function of iPSC-ECs from normal and DIO mice using comprehensive in vitro and in vivo assays.Six-week-old C57Bl/6 mice were fed with a normal or high-fat diet. At 24 weeks, iPSCs were generated from tail tip fibroblasts and differentiated into iPSC-ECs using a directed monolayer approach. In vitro functional analysis revealed that iPSC-ECs from DIO mice had significantly decreased capacity to form capillary-like networks, diminished migration, and lower proliferation. Microarray and ELISA confirmed elevated apoptotic, inflammatory, and oxidative stress pathways in DIO iPSC-ECs. Following hindlimb ischaemia, mice receiving intramuscular injections of DIO iPSC-ECs had significantly decreased reperfusion compared with mice injected with control healthy iPSC-ECs. Hindlimb sections revealed increased muscle atrophy and presence of inflammatory cells in mice receiving DIO iPSC-ECs. When pravastatin was co-administered to mice receiving DIO iPSC-ECs, a significant increase in reperfusion was observed; however, this beneficial effect was blunted by co-administration of the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester.This is the first study to provide evidence that iPSC-ECs from DIO mice exhibit signs of endothelial dysfunction and have suboptimal efficacy following transplantation in a hindlimb ischaemia model. These findings may have important implications for future treatment of PVD using iPSC-ECs in the obese population.

    View details for DOI 10.1093/eurheartj/ehu411

    View details for PubMedID 25368203

  • Characterization of the molecular mechanisms underlying increased ischemic damage in the aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 genetic polymorphism using a human induced pluripotent stem cell model system SCIENCE TRANSLATIONAL MEDICINE Ebert, A. D., Kodo, K., Liang, P., Wu, H., Huber, B. C., Riegler, J., Churko, J., Lee, J., de Almeida, P., Lan, F., Diecke, S., Burridge, P. W., Gold, J. D., Mochly-Rosen, D., Wu, J. C. 2014; 6 (255)

    Abstract

    Nearly 8% of the human population carries an inactivating point mutation in the gene that encodes the cardioprotective enzyme aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2). This genetic polymorphism (ALDH2*2) is linked to more severe outcomes from ischemic heart damage and an increased risk of coronary artery disease (CAD), but the underlying molecular bases are unknown. We investigated the ALDH2*2 mechanisms in a human model system of induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs) generated from individuals carrying the most common heterozygous form of the ALDH2*2 genotype. We showed that the ALDH2*2 mutation gave rise to elevated amounts of reactive oxygen species and toxic aldehydes, thereby inducing cell cycle arrest and activation of apoptotic signaling pathways, especially during ischemic injury. We established that ALDH2 controls cell survival decisions by modulating oxidative stress levels and that this regulatory circuitry was dysfunctional in the loss-of-function ALDH2*2 genotype, causing up-regulation of apoptosis in cardiomyocytes after ischemic insult. These results reveal a new function for the metabolic enzyme ALDH2 in modulation of cell survival decisions. Insight into the molecular mechanisms that mediate ALDH2*2-related increased ischemic damage is important for the development of specific diagnostic methods and improved risk management of CAD and may lead to patient-specific cardiac therapies.

    View details for DOI 10.1126/scitranslmed.3009027

    View details for Web of Science ID 000343316800004

  • Characterization of the molecular mechanisms underlying increased ischemic damage in the aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 genetic polymorphism using a human induced pluripotent stem cell model system. Science translational medicine Ebert, A. D., Kodo, K., Liang, P., Wu, H., Huber, B. C., Riegler, J., Churko, J., Lee, J., de Almeida, P., Lan, F., Diecke, S., Burridge, P. W., Gold, J. D., Mochly-Rosen, D., Wu, J. C. 2014; 6 (255): 255ra130-?

    Abstract

    Nearly 8% of the human population carries an inactivating point mutation in the gene that encodes the cardioprotective enzyme aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2). This genetic polymorphism (ALDH2*2) is linked to more severe outcomes from ischemic heart damage and an increased risk of coronary artery disease (CAD), but the underlying molecular bases are unknown. We investigated the ALDH2*2 mechanisms in a human model system of induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs) generated from individuals carrying the most common heterozygous form of the ALDH2*2 genotype. We showed that the ALDH2*2 mutation gave rise to elevated amounts of reactive oxygen species and toxic aldehydes, thereby inducing cell cycle arrest and activation of apoptotic signaling pathways, especially during ischemic injury. We established that ALDH2 controls cell survival decisions by modulating oxidative stress levels and that this regulatory circuitry was dysfunctional in the loss-of-function ALDH2*2 genotype, causing up-regulation of apoptosis in cardiomyocytes after ischemic insult. These results reveal a new function for the metabolic enzyme ALDH2 in modulation of cell survival decisions. Insight into the molecular mechanisms that mediate ALDH2*2-related increased ischemic damage is important for the development of specific diagnostic methods and improved risk management of CAD and may lead to patient-specific cardiac therapies.

    View details for DOI 10.1126/scitranslmed.3009027

    View details for PubMedID 25253673

  • Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes as an in vitro model for coxsackievirus b3-induced myocarditis and antiviral drug screening platform. Circulation research Sharma, A., Marceau, C., Hamaguchi, R., Burridge, P. W., Rajarajan, K., Churko, J. M., Wu, H., Sallam, K. I., Matsa, E., Sturzu, A. C., Che, Y., Ebert, A., Diecke, S., Liang, P., Red-Horse, K., Carette, J. E., Wu, S. M., Wu, J. C. 2014; 115 (6): 556-566

    Abstract

    Viral myocarditis is a life-threatening illness that may lead to heart failure or cardiac arrhythmias. A major causative agent for viral myocarditis is the B3 strain of coxsackievirus, a positive-sense RNA enterovirus. However, human cardiac tissues are difficult to procure in sufficient enough quantities for studying the mechanisms of cardiac-specific viral infection.This study examined whether human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs) could be used to model the pathogenic processes of coxsackievirus-induced viral myocarditis and to screen antiviral therapeutics for efficacy.hiPSC-CMs were infected with a luciferase-expressing coxsackievirus B3 strain (CVB3-Luc). Brightfield microscopy, immunofluorescence, and calcium imaging were used to characterize virally infected hiPSC-CMs for alterations in cellular morphology and calcium handling. Viral proliferation in hiPSC-CMs was quantified using bioluminescence imaging. Antiviral compounds including interferonβ1, ribavirin, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, and fluoxetine were tested for their capacity to abrogate CVB3-Luc proliferation in hiPSC-CMs in vitro. The ability of these compounds to reduce CVB3-Luc proliferation in hiPSC-CMs was consistent with reported drug effects in previous studies. Mechanistic analyses via gene expression profiling of hiPSC-CMs infected with CVB3-Luc revealed an activation of viral RNA and protein clearance pathways after interferonβ1 treatment.This study demonstrates that hiPSC-CMs express the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor, are susceptible to coxsackievirus infection, and can be used to predict antiviral drug efficacy. Our results suggest that the hiPSC-CM/CVB3-Luc assay is a sensitive platform that can screen novel antiviral therapeutics for their effectiveness in a high-throughput fashion.

    View details for DOI 10.1161/CIRCRESAHA.115.303810

    View details for PubMedID 25015077

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC4149868

  • Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes as an in vitro model for coxsackievirus B3-induced myocarditis and antiviral drug screening platform. Circulation research Sharma, A., Marceau, C., Hamaguchi, R., Burridge, P. W., Rajarajan, K., Churko, J. M., Wu, H., Sallam, K. I., Matsa, E., Sturzu, A. C., Che, Y., Ebert, A., Diecke, S., Liang, P., Red-Horse, K., Carette, J. E., Wu, S. M., Wu, J. C. 2014; 115 (6): 556-566

    Abstract

    Rationale: Viral myocarditis is a life-threatening illness that may lead to heart failure or cardiac arrhythmias. A major causative agent for viral myocarditis is the B3 strain of coxsackievirus, a positive-sense RNA enterovirus. However, human cardiac tissues are difficult to procure in sufficient enough quantities for studying the mechanisms of cardiac-specific viral infection. Objective: This study examined whether human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs) could be used to model the pathogenic processes of coxsackievirus-induced viral myocarditis and to screen antiviral therapeutics for efficacy. Methods and Results: Human iPSC-CMs were infected with a luciferase-expressing coxsackievirus B3 strain (CVB3-Luc). Brightfield microscopy, immunofluorescence, and calcium imaging were utilized to characterize virally-infected hiPSC-CMs for alterations in cellular morphology and calcium handling. Viral proliferation in hiPSC-CMs was quantified using bioluminescence imaging. Antiviral compounds including interferon beta 1 (IFNβ1), ribavirin, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, and fluoxetine were tested for their capacity to abrogate CVB3-Luc proliferation in hiPSC-CMs in vitro. The ability of these compounds to reduce CVB3-Luc proliferation in hiPSC-CMs was consistent with reported drug effects in previous studies. Mechanistic analyses via gene expression profiling of hiPSC-CMs infected with CVB3-Luc revealed an activation of viral RNA and protein clearance pathways after IFNβ1 treatment. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that hiPSC-CMs express the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor, are susceptible to coxsackievirus infection, and can be used to predict antiviral drug efficacy. Our results suggest that the hiPSC-CM/CVB3-Luc assay is a sensitive platform that can screen novel antiviral therapeutics for their effectiveness in a high-throughput fashion.

    View details for DOI 10.1161/CIRCRESAHA.115.303810

    View details for PubMedID 25015077

  • Genome Editing of Isogenic Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Recapitulates Long QT Phenotype for Drug Testing. Journal of the American College of Cardiology Wang, Y., Liang, P., Lan, F., Wu, H., Lisowski, L., Gu, M., Hu, S., Kay, M. A., Urnov, F. D., Shinnawi, R., Gold, J. D., Gepstein, L., Wu, J. C. 2014; 64 (5): 451-459

    Abstract

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) play an important role in disease modeling and drug testing. However, the current methods are time-consuming and lack an isogenic control.This study sought to establish an efficient technology to generate human PSC-based disease models with isogenic control.The ion channel genes KCNQ1 and KCNH2 with dominant negative mutations causing long QT syndrome types 1 and 2, respectively, were stably integrated into a safe harbor AAVS1 locus using zinc finger nuclease technology.Patch-clamp recording revealed that the edited iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs) displayed characteristic long QT syndrome phenotype and significant prolongation of the action potential duration compared with the unedited control cells. Finally, addition of nifedipine (L-type calcium channel blocker) or pinacidil (KATP-channel opener) shortened the action potential duration of iPSC-CMs, confirming the validity of isogenic iPSC lines for drug testing in the future.Our study demonstrates that iPSC-CM-based disease models can be rapidly generated by overexpression of dominant negative gene mutants.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jacc.2014.04.057

    View details for PubMedID 25082577

  • Screening drug-induced arrhythmia [corrected] using human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes and low-impedance microelectrode arrays. Circulation Navarrete, E. G., Liang, P., Lan, F., Sanchez-Freire, V., Simmons, C., Gong, T., Sharma, A., Burridge, P. W., Patlolla, B., Lee, A. S., Wu, H., Beygui, R. E., Wu, S. M., Robbins, R. C., Bers, D. M., Wu, J. C. 2013; 128 (11): S3-13

    Abstract

    Drug-induced arrhythmia is one of the most common causes of drug development failure and withdrawal from market. This study tested whether human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs) combined with a low-impedance microelectrode array (MEA) system could improve on industry-standard preclinical cardiotoxicity screening methods, identify the effects of well-characterized drugs, and elucidate underlying risk factors for drug-induced arrhythmia. hiPSC-CMs may be advantageous over immortalized cell lines because they possess similar functional characteristics as primary human cardiomyocytes and can be generated in unlimited quantities.Pharmacological responses of beating embryoid bodies exposed to a comprehensive panel of drugs at 65 to 95 days postinduction were determined. Responses of hiPSC-CMs to drugs were qualitatively and quantitatively consistent with the reported drug effects in literature. Torsadogenic hERG blockers, such as sotalol and quinidine, produced statistically and physiologically significant effects, consistent with patch-clamp studies, on human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes hESC-CMs. False-negative and false-positive hERG blockers were identified accurately. Consistent with published studies using animal models, early afterdepolarizations and ectopic beats were observed in 33% and 40% of embryoid bodies treated with sotalol and quinidine, respectively, compared with negligible early afterdepolarizations and ectopic beats in untreated controls.We found that drug-induced arrhythmias can be recapitulated in hiPSC-CMs and documented with low impedance MEA. Our data indicate that the MEA/hiPSC-CM assay is a sensitive, robust, and efficient platform for testing drug effectiveness and for arrhythmia screening. This system may hold great potential for reducing drug development costs and may provide significant advantages over current industry standard assays that use immortalized cell lines or animal models.

    View details for DOI 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.112.000570

    View details for PubMedID 24030418

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC3855862

  • Screening drug-induced arrhythmia events using human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes and low-impedance microelectrode arrays. Circulation Navarrete, E. G., Liang, P., Lan, F., Sanchez-Freire, V., Simmons, C., Gong, T., Sharma, A., Burridge, P. W., Patlolla, B., Lee, A. S., Wu, H., Beygui, R. E., Wu, S. M., Robbins, R. C., Bers, D. M., Wu, J. C. 2013; 128 (11): S3-13

    Abstract

    Drug-induced arrhythmia is one of the most common causes of drug development failure and withdrawal from market. This study tested whether human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs) combined with a low-impedance microelectrode array (MEA) system could improve on industry-standard preclinical cardiotoxicity screening methods, identify the effects of well-characterized drugs, and elucidate underlying risk factors for drug-induced arrhythmia. hiPSC-CMs may be advantageous over immortalized cell lines because they possess similar functional characteristics as primary human cardiomyocytes and can be generated in unlimited quantities.Pharmacological responses of beating embryoid bodies exposed to a comprehensive panel of drugs at 65 to 95 days postinduction were determined. Responses of hiPSC-CMs to drugs were qualitatively and quantitatively consistent with the reported drug effects in literature. Torsadogenic hERG blockers, such as sotalol and quinidine, produced statistically and physiologically significant effects, consistent with patch-clamp studies, on human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes hESC-CMs. False-negative and false-positive hERG blockers were identified accurately. Consistent with published studies using animal models, early afterdepolarizations and ectopic beats were observed in 33% and 40% of embryoid bodies treated with sotalol and quinidine, respectively, compared with negligible early afterdepolarizations and ectopic beats in untreated controls.We found that drug-induced arrhythmias can be recapitulated in hiPSC-CMs and documented with low impedance MEA. Our data indicate that the MEA/hiPSC-CM assay is a sensitive, robust, and efficient platform for testing drug effectiveness and for arrhythmia screening. This system may hold great potential for reducing drug development costs and may provide significant advantages over current industry standard assays that use immortalized cell lines or animal models.

    View details for DOI 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.112.000570

    View details for PubMedID 24030418

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC3855862