Bio

Professional Education


  • MD, Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Medicine (2015)
  • BA, Harvard University, Molecular and Cellular Biology, Music (2011)

Research & Scholarship

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


Precision surgery: patient-specific bypass grafting and valve repair strategies
Autonomous robotic surgery
Photosynthetic therapies to circumvent myocardial ischemia
Collateral artery formation as protection against myocardial infarction
Angiogenesis and myocardial regeneration to prevent heart failure
Tissue engineering to limit ventricular remodeling
Understanding the biomechanics of injured and failing hearts

Current Clinical Interests


  • Coronary Revascularization
  • Heart Transplantation
  • Mitral Valve Repair
  • Minimally Invasive Surgery
  • Robotics
  • Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm
  • Aortic Valve Repair
  • Ventricular Assist Devices

Publications

All Publications


  • Impact of advanced clinical fellowship training on future research productivity and career advancement in adult cardiac surgery. Surgery Wang, H., Bajaj, S. S., Williams, K. M., Pickering, J. M., Heiler, J. C., Manjunatha, K., O'Donnell, C. T., Sanchez, M., Boyd, J. H. 2020

    Abstract

    BACKGROUND: Advanced clinical fellowships are important for training surgeons with a niche expertise. Whether this additional training impacts future academic achievement, however, remains unknown. Here, we investigated the impact of advanced fellowship training on research productivity and career advancement among active, academic cardiac surgeons. We hypothesized that advanced fellowships do not significantly boost future academic achievement.METHODS: Using online sources (eg, department webpages, CTSNet, Scopus, Grantome), we studied adult cardiac surgeons who are current faculty at accredited United States cardiothoracic surgery training programs, and who have practiced only at United States academic centers since 1986 (n= 227). Publicly available data regarding career advancement, research productivity, and grant funding were collected. Data are expressed as counts or medians.RESULTS: In our study, 78 (34.4%) surgeons completed an advanced clinical fellowship, and 149 (65.6%) did not. Surgeons who pursued an advanced fellowship spent more time focused on surgical training (P < .0001), and those who did not were more likely to have completed a dedicated research fellowship (P= .0482). Both groups exhibited similar cumulative total publications (P= .6862), H-index (P= .6232), frequency of National Institutes of Health grant funding (P= .8708), and time to achieve full professor rank (P= .7099). After stratification by current academic rank, or by whether surgeons pursued a dedicated research fellowship, completion of an advanced clinical fellowship was not associated with increased research productivity or accelerated career advancement.CONCLUSION: Academic adult cardiac surgeons who pursue advanced clinical fellowships exhibit similar research productivity and similar career advancement as those who do not pursue additional clinical training.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.surg.2020.06.016

    View details for PubMedID 32747139

  • Multiaxial Lenticular Stress-Strain Relationship of Native Myocardium is Preserved by Infarct-Induced Natural Heart Regeneration in Neonatal Mice. Scientific reports Wang, H., Bennett-Kennett, R., Paulsen, M. J., Hironaka, C. E., Thakore, A. D., Farry, J. M., Eskandari, A., Lucian, H. J., Shin, H. S., Wu, M. A., Imbrie-Moore, A. M., Steele, A. N., Stapleton, L. M., Zhu, Y., Dauskardt, R. H., Woo, Y. J. 2020; 10 (1): 7319

    Abstract

    Neonatal mice exhibit natural heart regeneration after myocardial infarction (MI) on postnatal day 1 (P1), but this ability is lost by postnatal day 7 (P7). Cardiac biomechanics intricately affect long-term heart function, but whether regenerated cardiac muscle is biomechanically similar to native myocardium remains unknown. We hypothesized that neonatal heart regeneration preserves native left ventricular (LV) biomechanical properties after MI. C57BL/6J mice underwent sham surgery or left anterior descending coronary artery ligation at age P1 or P7. Echocardiography performed 4 weeks post-MI showed that P1 MI and sham mice (n=22, each) had similar LV wall thickness, diameter, and ejection fraction (59.6% vs 60.7%, p=0.6514). Compared to P7 shams (n=20), P7 MI mice (n=20) had significant LV wall thinning, chamber enlargement, and depressed ejection fraction (32.6% vs 61.8%, p<0.0001). Afterward, the LV was explanted and pressurized ex vivo, and the multiaxial lenticular stress-strain relationship was tracked. While LV tissue modulus for P1 MI and sham mice were similar (341.9 kPa vs 363.4 kPa, p=0.6140), the modulus for P7 MI mice was significantly greater than that for P7 shams (691.6 kPa vs 429.2 kPa, p=0.0194). We conclude that, in neonatal mice, regenerated LV muscle has similar biomechanical properties as native LV myocardium.

    View details for DOI 10.1038/s41598-020-63324-w

    View details for PubMedID 32355240

  • Natural Heart Regeneration in a Neonatal Rat Myocardial Infarction Model. Cells Wang, H., Paulsen, M. J., Hironaka, C. E., Shin, H. S., Farry, J. M., Thakore, A. D., Jung, J., Lucian, H. J., Eskandari, A., Anilkumar, S., Wu, M. A., Cabatu, M. C., Steele, A. N., Stapleton, L. M., Zhu, Y., Woo, Y. J. 2020; 9 (1)

    Abstract

    Newborn mice and piglets exhibit natural heart regeneration after myocardial infarction (MI). Discovering other mammals with this ability would provide evidence that neonatal cardiac regeneration after MI may be a conserved phenotype, which if activated in adults could open new options for treating ischemic cardiomyopathy in humans. Here, we hypothesized that newborn rats undergo natural heart regeneration after MI. Using a neonatal rat MI model, we performed left anterior descending coronary artery ligation or sham surgery in one-day-old rats under hypothermic circulatory arrest (n = 74). Operative survival was 97.3%. At 1 day post-surgery, rats in the MI group exhibited significantly reduced ejection fraction (EF) compared to shams (87.1% vs. 53.0%, p < 0.0001). At 3 weeks post-surgery, rats in the sham and MI groups demonstrated no difference in EF (71.1% vs. 69.2%, respectively, p = 0.2511), left ventricular wall thickness (p = 0.9458), or chamber diameter (p = 0.7801). Masson's trichome and picrosirius red staining revealed minimal collagen scar after MI. Increased numbers of cardiomyocytes positive for 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (p = 0.0072), Ki-67 (p = 0.0340), and aurora B kinase (p = 0.0430) were observed within the peri-infarct region after MI, indicating ischemia-induced cardiomyocyte proliferation. Overall, we present a neonatal rat MI model and demonstrate that newborn rats are capable of endogenous neocardiomyogenesis after MI.

    View details for DOI 10.3390/cells9010229

    View details for PubMedID 31963369

  • Endoscopic Radial Artery Harvesting During Anesthesia Line Placement Reduces the Time and Cost of Multivessel Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting. Innovations (Philadelphia, Pa.) Wang, H., Bilbao, M. S., Miller, S. L., O'Donnell, C. T., Boyd, J. H. 2020: 1556984519882014

    Abstract

    OBJECTIVE: Endoscopic radial artery (RA) harvesting performed concurrently with internal mammary artery (IMA) takedown and endoscopic saphenous vein (SV) harvesting creates a crowded and inefficient operating room environment. We assessed the effect of a presternotomy RA harvest strategy on surgery time and costs.METHODS: A total of 41 patients underwent elective, first-time, isolated multivessel on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting including an IMA, RA, and SV graft. The first 20 patients (Phase I) underwent endoscopic RA harvesting concurrently with IMA takedown and endoscopic SV harvesting after sternotomy, requiring two sets of endoscopic harvesting equipment per case, each used by a separate individual. The final 21 patients (Phase II) underwent endoscopic RA harvesting during anesthesia line placement, completing the procedure before sternotomy, thus requiring only one set of endoscopic harvesting equipment reused by a single individual.RESULTS: There were no differences in baseline patient characteristics, number of bypasses, duration of SV or RA harvest time, or duration of cardiopulmonary bypass or cross-clamp time between the two groups. Total surgery time was reduced by 32 minutes in Phase II (P = 0.044). Relative to a total hospital direct cost of 100.00 units, total surgery costs were reduced from 29.33 units in Phase I to 25.62 units in Phase II (P = 0.001). No anesthesia- or RA harvest-related complications occurred in either group.CONCLUSIONS: Endoscopic RA harvesting can be safely performed during anesthesia line placement prior to sternotomy. Our simple but innovative strategy improves intraoperative workflow, reduces the time and cost of surgery, and advances the delivery of high-quality patient care.

    View details for DOI 10.1177/1556984519882014

    View details for PubMedID 31903868

  • In Vivo Validation of Restored Chordal Biomechanics After Mitral Ring Annuloplasty in a Rare Ovine Case of Natural Chronic Functional Mitral Regurgitation. Journal of cardiovascular development and disease Wang, H., Paulsen, M. J., Imbrie-Moore, A. M., Tada, Y., Bergamasco, H., Baker, S. W., Shudo, Y., Ma, M., Woo, J. Y. 2020; 7 (2)

    Abstract

    Mitral valve chordae tendineae forces are elevated in the setting of mitral regurgitation (MR). Ring annuloplasty is an essential component of surgical repair for MR, but whether chordal forces are reduced after mitral annuloplasty has never been validated in vivo. Here, we present an extremely rare ovine case of natural, severe chronic functional MR, in which we used force-sensing fiber Bragg grating neochordae to directly measure chordal forces in the baseline setting of severe MR, as well as after successful mitral ring annuloplasty repair. Overall, our report is the first to confirm in vivo that mitral ring annuloplasty reduces elevated chordae tendineae forces associated with chronic functional MR.

    View details for DOI 10.3390/jcdd7020017

    View details for PubMedID 32429298

  • Photosynthetic symbiotic therapy. Aging Wang, H., Wu, M. A., Woo, Y. J. 2019

    View details for PubMedID 30683833

  • A Unique Collateral Artery Development Program Promotes Neonatal Heart Regeneration. Cell Das, S., Goldstone, A. B., Wang, H., Farry, J., D'Amato, G., Paulsen, M. J., Eskandari, A., Hironaka, C. E., Phansalkar, R., Sharma, B., Rhee, S., Shamskhou, E. A., Agalliu, D., de Jesus Perez, V., Woo, Y. J., Red-Horse, K. 2019

    Abstract

    Collateral arteries are an uncommon vessel subtype that can provide alternate blood flow to preserve tissue following vascular occlusion. Some patients with heart disease develop collateral coronary arteries, and this correlates with increased survival. However, it is not known how these collaterals develop or how to stimulate them. We demonstrate that neonatal mouse hearts use a novel mechanism to build collateral arteries in response to injury. Arterial endothelial cells (ECs) migrated away from arteries along existing capillaries and reassembled into collateral arteries, which we termed "artery reassembly". Artery ECs expressed CXCR4, and following injury, capillary ECs induced its ligand, CXCL12. CXCL12 or CXCR4 deletion impaired collateral artery formation and neonatal heart regeneration. Artery reassembly was nearly absent in adults but was induced by exogenous CXCL12. Thus, understanding neonatal regenerative mechanisms can identify pathways that restore these processes in adults and identify potentially translatable therapeutic strategies for ischemic heart disease.

    View details for PubMedID 30686582

  • Use of a supramolecular polymeric hydrogel as an effective post-operative pericardial adhesion barrier. Nature biomedical engineering Stapleton, L. M., Steele, A. N., Wang, H., Lopez Hernandez, H., Yu, A. C., Paulsen, M. J., Smith, A. A., Roth, G. A., Thakore, A. D., Lucian, H. J., Totherow, K. P., Baker, S. W., Tada, Y., Farry, J. M., Eskandari, A., Hironaka, C. E., Jaatinen, K. J., Williams, K. M., Bergamasco, H., Marschel, C., Chadwick, B., Grady, F., Ma, M., Appel, E. A., Woo, Y. J. 2019; 3 (8): 611–20

    Abstract

    Post-operative adhesions form as a result of normal wound healing processes following any type of surgery. In cardiac surgery, pericardial adhesions are particularly problematic during reoperations, as surgeons must release the adhesions from the surface of the heart before the intended procedure can begin, thereby substantially lengthening operation times and introducing risks of haemorrhage and injury to the heart and lungs during sternal re-entry and cardiac dissection. Here we show that a dynamically crosslinked supramolecular polymer-nanoparticle hydrogel, with viscoelastic and flow properties that enable spraying onto tissue as well as robust tissue adherence and local retention in vivo for two weeks, reduces the formation of pericardial adhesions. In a rat model of severe pericardial adhesions, the hydrogel markedly reduced the severity of the adhesions, whereas commercial adhesion barriers (including Seprafilm and Interceed) did not. The hydrogels also reduced the severity of cardiac adhesions (relative to untreated animals) in a clinically relevant cardiopulmonary-bypass model in sheep. This viscoelastic supramolecular polymeric hydrogel represents a promising clinical solution for the prevention of post-operative pericardial adhesions.

    View details for DOI 10.1038/s41551-019-0442-z

    View details for PubMedID 31391596

  • Bioengineered analog of stromal cell-derived factor 1α preserves the biaxial mechanical properties of native myocardium after infarction. Journal of the mechanical behavior of biomedical materials Wang, H., Wisneski, A., Paulsen, M. J., Imbrie-Moore, A., Wang, Z., Xuan, Y., Hernandez, H. L., Lucian, H. J., Eskandari, A., Thakore, A. D., Farry, J. M., Hironaka, C. E., von Bornstaedt, D., Steele, A. N., Stapleton, L. M., Williams, K. M., Wu, M. A., MacArthur, J. W., Woo, Y. J. 2019; 96: 165–71

    Abstract

    Adverse remodeling of the left ventricle (LV) after myocardial infarction (MI) results in abnormal tissue biomechanics and impaired cardiac function, often leading to heart failure. We hypothesized that intramyocardial delivery of engineered stromal cell-derived factor 1α analog (ESA), our previously-developed supra-efficient pro-angiogenic chemokine, preserves biaxial LV mechanical properties after MI. Male Wistar rats (n = 45) underwent sham surgery (n = 15) or permanent left anterior descending coronary artery ligation. Rats sustaining MI were randomized for intramyocardial injections of either saline (100 μL, n = 15) or ESA (6 μg/kg, n = 15), delivered at four standardized borderzone sites. After 4 weeks, echocardiography was performed, and the hearts were explanted. Tensile testing of the anterolateral LV wall was performed using a displacement-controlled biaxial load frame, and modulus was determined after constitutive modeling. At 4 weeks post-MI, compared to saline controls, ESA-treated hearts had greater wall thickness (1.68 ± 0.05 mm vs 1.42 ± 0.08 mm, p = 0.008), smaller end-diastolic LV internal dimension (6.88 ± 0.29 mm vs 7.69 ± 0.22 mm, p = 0.044), and improved ejection fraction (62.8 ± 3.0% vs 49.4 ± 4.5%, p = 0.014). Histologic analysis revealed significantly reduced infarct size for ESA-treated hearts compared to saline controls (29.4 ± 2.9% vs 41.6 ± 3.1%, p = 0.021). Infarcted hearts treated with ESA exhibited decreased modulus compared to those treated with saline in both the circumferential (211.5 ± 6.9 kPa vs 264.3 ± 12.5 kPa, p = 0.001) and longitudinal axes (194.5 ± 6.5 kPa vs 258.1 ± 14.4 kPa, p < 0.001). In both principal directions, ESA-treated infarcted hearts possessed similar tissue compliance as sham non-infarcted hearts. Overall, intramyocardial ESA therapy improves post-MI ventricular remodeling and function, reduces infarct size, and preserves native LV biaxial mechanical properties.

    View details for PubMedID 31035067

  • Scimitar Syndrome in Children and Adults: Natural History, Outcomes, and Risk Analysis. The Annals of thoracic surgery Wang, H., Kalfa, D., Rosenbaum, M. S., Ginns, J. N., Lewis, M. J., Glickstein, J. S., Bacha, E. A., Chai, P. J. 2018; 105 (2): 592–98

    Abstract

    Scimitar syndrome involves congenital anomalous pulmonary venous return to the inferior vena cava. Optimal management remains controversial. We describe the natural history of disease, nonsurgical and surgical outcomes, and risk factors for poor outcomes at our institution.Patients with anomalous pulmonary venous return to the inferior vena cava documented on echocardiography at our institution between January 1994 and January 2015 were reviewed retrospectively. The study protocol IRB-AAAO1805 was approved.Forty-seven patients were identified, including 20 infants with significant associated congenital heart defects (42.6%, including 7 with single ventricle physiology), and 10 infants (21.3%) and 16 noninfants (34.0%) with isolated scimitar syndrome. Median follow-up was 3.55 years. Noninfants exhibited lower incidences of right pulmonary artery hypoplasia (p < 0.001), aortopulmonary collaterals (p = 0.004), and scimitar vein obstruction at the caval confluence (p = 0.032). Eighteen patients (38.3%) underwent surgical repair for scimitar syndrome. Overall mortality after baffle repair or scimitar vein reimplantation was 37.5% (3 of 8) for infants and 0% (0 of 6) for noninfants (p = 0.209). Overall mortality for medically managed infants was 46.7% (7 of 15) compared with 0% (0 of 8) for noninfants (p = 0.052). Multivariable analyses identified infantile onset as an independent risk factor for stenosis or obstruction after repair (hazard ratio 9.34, p = 0.048), and single ventricle physiology as an independent risk factor for mortality among unrepaired patients (hazard ratio 29.8, p = 0.004).The severity of scimitar syndrome depends on presenting age and associated congenital heart disease. Nonsurgical and surgical outcomes are suboptimal for infantile disease, which is a risk factor for stenosis after repair. Single ventricle physiology is associated with poor prognosis.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.athoracsur.2017.06.061

    View details for PubMedID 29054305

  • Collagen-Supplemented Incubation Rapidly Augments Mechanical Property of Fibroblast Cell Sheets. Tissue engineering. Part A Zhu, Y., Thakore, A. D., Farry, J. M., Jung, J., Anilkumar, S., Wang, H., Imbrie-Moore, A. M., Park, M. H., Tran, N. A., Woo, Y. J. 2020

    Abstract

    Cell sheet technology using UpCell plates is a modern tool that enables the rapid creation of a single-layered cells without using extracellular matrix enzymatic digestion. Although this technique has the advantage of maintaining a sheet of cells without needing artificial scaffolds, these cell sheets remain extremely fragile. Collagen, the most abundant extracellular matrix component, is an attractive candidate for modulating tissue mechanical properties given its tunable property. In this study, we demonstrated rapid mechanical property augmentation of human dermal fibroblast cell sheets after incubation with bovine type I collagen for 24 hours on UpCell plates. We showed that treatment with collagen resulted in increased collagen I incorporation within the cell sheet without affecting cell morphology, cell type, or cell sheet quality. Atomic force microscopy measurements for controls, and cell sheets that received 50g/mL and 100g/mL collagen I treatments revealed an average Young's modulus of their respective intercellular regions: 6.6±1.0, 14.4±6.6, and 19.8±3.8 kPa during the loading condition, and 10.3±4.7, 11.7±2.2, and 18.1±3.4 kPa during the unloading condition. This methodology of rapid mechanical property augmentation of a cell sheet has a potential impact on cell sheet technology by improving the ease of construct manipulation, enabling new translational tissue engineering applications.

    View details for DOI 10.1089/ten.TEA.2020.0128

    View details for PubMedID 32703108

  • Transcriptional Profiling of Normal, Stenotic, and Regurgitant Human Aortic Valves. Genes Greene, C. L., Jaatinen, K. J., Wang, H., Koyano, T. K., Bilbao, M. S., Woo, Y. J. 2020; 11 (7)

    Abstract

    The genetic mechanisms underlying aortic stenosis (AS) and aortic insufficiency (AI) disease progression remain unclear. We hypothesized that normal aortic valves and those with AS or AI all exhibit unique transcriptional profiles. Normal control (NC) aortic valves were collected from non-matched donor hearts that were otherwise acceptable for transplantation (n = 5). Valves with AS or AI (n = 5, each) were collected from patients undergoing surgical aortic valve replacement. High-throughput sequencing of total RNA revealed 6438 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) for AS vs. NC, 4994 DEGs for AI vs. NC, and 2771 DEGs for AS vs. AI. Among 21 DEGs of interest, APCDD1L, CDH6, COL10A1, HBB, IBSP, KRT14, PLEKHS1, PRSS35, and TDO2 were upregulated in both AS and AI compared to NC, whereas ALDH1L1, EPHB1, GPX3, HIF3A, and KCNT1 were downregulated in both AS and AI (p < 0.05). COL11A1, H19, HIF1A, KCNJ6, PRND, and SPP1 were upregulated only in AS, and NPY was downregulated only in AS (p < 0.05). The functional network for AS clustered around ion regulation, immune regulation, and lipid homeostasis, and that for AI clustered around ERK1/2 regulation. Overall, we report transcriptional profiling data for normal human aortic valves from non-matched donor hearts that were acceptable for transplantation and demonstrated that valves with AS and AI possess unique genetic signatures. These data create a roadmap for the development of novel therapeutics to treat AS and AI.

    View details for DOI 10.3390/genes11070789

    View details for PubMedID 32674273

  • Ex Vivo Analysis of a Porcine Bicuspid Aortic Valve and Aneurysm Disease Model. The Annals of thoracic surgery Zhu, Y., Imbrie-Moore, A. M., Park, M. H., Paulsen, M. J., Wang, H., MacArthur, J. W., Woo, Y. J. 2020

    Abstract

    We identified an extremely rare congenital porcine type 0 lateral bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) from a fresh porcine heart. Using a 3D-printed ex vivo left heart simulator, we analyzed valvular hemodynamics at baseline, in an aortic aneurysm disease model, and after valve-sparing root replacement (VSRR). We showed that BAV regurgitation due to aortic aneurysm can be successfully repaired without significant hemodynamic impairment with the VSRR technique in an individualized approach. Our results provide direct hemodynamic evidence supporting the use of VSRR for patients with BAV regurgitation.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.athoracsur.2020.05.086

    View details for PubMedID 32663472

  • Novel bicuspid aortic valve model with aortic regurgitation for hemodynamic status analysis using an exvivo simulator. The Journal of thoracic and cardiovascular surgery Zhu, Y., Imbrie-Moore, A. M., Paulsen, M. J., Priromprintr, B., Wang, H., Lucian, H. J., Farry, J. M., Woo, Y. J. 2020

    Abstract

    OBJECTIVE: The objective was to design and evaluate a clinically relevant, novel exvivo bicuspid aortic valve model that mimics the most common human phenotype with associated aortic regurgitation.METHODS: Three bovine aortic valves were mounted asymmetrically in a previously validated 3-dimensional-printed left heart simulator. The non-right commissure and the non-left commissure were both shifted slightly toward the left-right commissure, and the left and right coronary cusps were sewn together. The left-right commissure was then detached and reimplanted 10mm lower than its native height. Free margin shortening was used for valve repair. Hemodynamic status, high-speed videography, and echocardiography data were collected before and after the repair.RESULTS: The bicuspid aortic valve model was successfully produced and repaired. High-speed videography confirmed prolapse of the fused cusp of the baseline bicuspid aortic valve models in diastole. Hemodynamic and pressure data confirmed accurate simulation of diseased conditions with aortic regurgitation and the subsequent repair. Regurgitant fraction postrepair was significantly reduced compared with that at baseline (14.5 ± 4.4% vs 28.6%±3.4%; P=.037). There was no change in peak velocity, peak gradient, or mean gradient across the valve pre- versus postrepair: 293.3±18.3cm/sec versus 325.3±58.2cm/sec (P=.29), 34.3±4.2mm Hg versus 43.3±15.4mm Hg (P=.30), and 11±1mm Hg versus 9.3±2.5mm Hg (P=.34), respectively.CONCLUSIONS: An exvivo bicuspid aortic valve model was designed that recapitulated the most common human phenotype with aortic regurgitation. These valves were successfully repaired, validating its potential for evaluating valve hemodynamics and optimizing surgical repair for bicuspid aortic valves.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jtcvs.2020.06.028

    View details for PubMedID 32747120

  • Bilateral vs. Single Internal Mammary Artery Grafts for Coronary Artery Bypass in the United States. The Annals of thoracic surgery Zhu, Y., Lingala, B., Wang, H., Woo, Y. J. 2020

    Abstract

    BACKGROUND: The use of bilateral internal mammary arteries (BIMA) in coronary artery bypass grafting remains controversial. The objective of this study was to investigate the long-term outcomes using BIMA versus single internal mammary artery (SIMA) in the United States.METHODS: Medicare beneficiaries who underwent primary isolated coronary artery bypass surgery using SIMA or BIMA from 1999 to 2010 were included in this retrospective study, with follow up through 2014. Greedy matching algorithms were used for 1:4 matching on propensity score based on age, gender, year of surgery, and comorbidities. Kaplan-Meier survival analyses were performed. The primary outcome was death from any cause.RESULTS: A total of 1,156,339 and 25,005 patients aged 72±7.6 and 70.3±7.9 years-old underwent primary isolated coronary artery bypass surgery using SIMA and BIMA, respectively. Matching created comparable groups with 95,780 SIMA and 24,160 BIMA patients. Matched median survival using SIMA was 11.8 versus 12.4 years using BIMA (p<.0001). At ten years of follow up, the respective survival rates of using SIMA versus BIMA were 58.3% versus 61.1%, respectively. The stratified matched median survival using SIMA versus BIMA with one, two, three, and four or more aortocoronary bypasses were 11.8 versus 12.3 years (p=.005), 11.7 versus 12.5 years (p<.0001), 11.9 versus 12.3 years (p=.01), and 11.4 versus 12 years (p=.02), respectively.CONCLUSIONS: Primary isolated coronary artery bypass surgery using BIMA rather than SIMA was associated with improved long-term survival. This survival advantage was independent of aortocoronary bypass grafts or patient diabetes status.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.athoracsur.2020.05.049

    View details for PubMedID 32599051

  • Safety of photosynthetic Synechococcus elongatus for in vivo cyanobacteria-mammalian symbiotic therapeutics. Microbial biotechnology Williams, K. M., Wang, H., Paulsen, M. J., Thakore, A. D., Rieck, M., Lucian, H. J., Grady, F., Hironaka, C. E., Chien, A. J., Farry, J. M., Shin, H. S., Jaatinen, K. J., Eskandari, A., Stapleton, L. M., Steele, A. N., Cohen, J. E., Woo, Y. J. 2020

    Abstract

    The cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus (SE) has been shown to rescue ischaemic heart muscle after myocardial infarction by photosynthetic oxygen production. Here, we investigated SE toxicity and hypothesized that systemic SE exposure does not elicit a significant immune response in rats. Wistar rats intravenously received SE (n=12), sterile saline (n=12) or E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS, n=4), and a subset (8 SE, 8 saline) received a repeat injection 4weeks later. At baseline, 4h, 24h, 48h, 8days and 4weeks after injection, clinical assessments, blood cultures, blood counts, lymphocyte phenotypes, liver function tests, proinflammatory cytokines and immunoglobulins were assessed. Across all metrics, SE rats responded comparably to saline controls, displaying no clinically significant immune response. As expected, LPS rats exhibited severe immunological responses. Systemic SE administration does not induce sepsis or toxicity in rats, thereby supporting the safety of cyanobacteria-mammalian symbiotic therapeutics using this organism.

    View details for DOI 10.1111/1751-7915.13596

    View details for PubMedID 32476224

  • A novel cross-species model of Barlow's disease to biomechanically analyze repair techniques in an exvivo left heart simulator. The Journal of thoracic and cardiovascular surgery Imbrie-Moore, A. M., Paulsen, M. J., Zhu, Y., Wang, H., Lucian, H. J., Farry, J. M., MacArthur, J. W., Ma, M., Woo, Y. J. 2020

    Abstract

    OBJECTIVE: Barlow's disease remains challenging to repair, given the complex valvular morphology and lack of quantitative data to compare techniques. Although there have been recent strides in exvivo evaluation of cardiac mechanics, to our knowledge, there is no disease model that accurately simulates the morphology and pathophysiology of Barlow's disease. The purpose of this study was to design such a model.METHODS: To simulate Barlow's disease, a cross-species exvivo model was developed. Bovine mitral valves (n=4) were sewn into a porcine annulus mount to create excess leaflet tissue and elongated chordae. A heart simulator generated physiologic conditions while hemodynamic data, high-speed videography, and chordal force measurements were collected. The regurgitant valves were repaired using nonresectional repair techniques such as neochord placement.RESULTS: The model successfully imitated the complexities of Barlow's disease, including redundant, billowing bileaflet tissues with notable regurgitation. After repair, hemodynamic data confirmed reduction of mitral leakage volume (25.9±2.9 vs 2.1±1.8mL, P<.001) and strain gauge analysis revealed lower primary chordae forces (0.51±0.17 vs 0.10±0.05N, P<.001). In addition, the maximum rate of change of force was significantly lower postrepair for both primary (30.80±11.38 vs 8.59±4.83N/s, P<.001) and secondary chordae (33.52±10.59 vs 19.07±7.00N/s, P=.006).CONCLUSIONS: This study provides insight into the biomechanics of Barlow's disease, including sharply fluctuating force profiles experienced by elongated chordae prerepair, as well as restoration of primary chordae forces postrepair. Our disease model facilitates further in-depth analyses to optimize the repair of Barlow's disease.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jtcvs.2020.01.086

    View details for PubMedID 32249088

  • A novel 3D-Printed preferential posterior mitral annular dilation device delineates regurgitation onset threshold in an ex vivo heart simulator. Medical engineering & physics Imbrie-Moore, A. M., Paullin, C. C., Paulsen, M. J., Grady, F., Wang, H., Hironaka, C. E., Farry, J. M., Lucian, H. J., Woo, Y. J. 2020

    Abstract

    Mitral regurgitation (MR) due to annular dilation occurs in a variety of mitral valve diseases and is observed in many patients with heart failure due to mitral regurgitation. To understand the biomechanics of MR and ultimately design an optimized annuloplasty ring, a representative disease model with asymmetric dilation of the mitral annulus is needed. This work shows the design and implementation of a 3D-printed valve dilation device to preferentially dilate the posterior mitral valve annulus. Porcine mitral valves (n=3) were sewn into the device and mounted within a left heart simulator that generates physiologic pressures and flows through the valves, while chordal forces were measured. The valves were incrementally dilated, inducing MR, while hemodynamic and force data were collected. Flow analysis demonstrated that MR increased linearly with respect to percent annular dilation when dilation was greater than a 25.6% dilation threshold (p<0.01). Pre-threshold, dilation did not cause significant increases in regurgitant fraction. Forces on the chordae tendineae increased as dilation increased prior to the identified threshold (p < 0.01); post-threshold, the MR resulted in highly variable forces. Ultimately, this novel dilation device can be used to more accurately model a wide range of MR disease states and their corresponding repair techniques using ex vivo experimentation. In particular, this annular dilation device provides the means to investigate the design and optimization of novel annuloplasty rings.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.medengphy.2020.01.005

    View details for PubMedID 32008935

  • Women in Thoracic Surgery Scholarship: Impact on Career Path and Interest in Cardiothoracic Surgery. The Annals of thoracic surgery Williams, K. M., Hironaka, C. E., Wang, H., Bajaj, S. S., O'Donnell, C. T., Sanchez, M., Boyd, J., Kane, L., Backhus, L. 2020

    Abstract

    Women remain underrepresented in Cardiothoracic Surgery (CTS). In 2005, Women in Thoracic Surgery (WTS) began offering scholarships to promote engagement of women in CTS careers. This study explores the effect of WTS scholarships on CTS career milestones.We assessed career development using the number of awardees matching into CTS residency/fellowship, American Board of Thoracic Surgery (ABTS) certification, and academic CTS appointment. Scholarship awardee data were obtained from our WTS database. Comparison data were gathered from the National Residency Match Program and ABTS. Details of the current roles of ABTS certified women were determined from public resources. Qualitative results were gathered from post-scholarship surveys.106 WTS scholarships have been awarded to 38 medical students (MS, 36%), 41 General Surgery residents (GR, 39%), and 27 CTS residents/fellows (CR, 25%). Among MS, 26% of awardees entered integrated CTS residency (vs. <0.1% for medical students, p<0.0001), while 37% entered general surgery residency (vs. 4.8% for medical students, p<0.0001). Of GR awardees, 59% entered CTS fellowships (vs. 7.7% for general surgery residents, p<0.0001), and of CR awardees, 100% earned ABTS certification (vs. 73% ABTS pass rate, p=.01). Of ABTS certified awardees, 44% are practicing CT surgeons at U.S. academic training institutions (vs. 33% of non-awardee ABTS certified women, p=0.419). All awardees reported that their scholarship was valuable in their development.Receipt of a WTS scholarship is associated with successful pursuit of CTS career milestones at significantly higher rates than contemporaries. These scholarships foster a supportive community for women trainees in CTS.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.athoracsur.2020.07.020

    View details for PubMedID 32961134

  • A Novel Aortic Regurgitation Model from Cusp Prolapse with Hemodynamic Validation Using an Ex Vivo Left Heart Simulator. Journal of cardiovascular translational research Zhu, Y., Imbrie-Moore, A. M., Paulsen, M. J., Priromprintr, B., Park, M. H., Wang, H., Lucian, H. J., Farry, J. M., Woo, Y. J. 2020

    Abstract

    Although ex vivo simulation is a valuable tool for surgical optimization, a disease model that mimics human aortic regurgitation (AR) from cusp prolapse is needed to accurately examine valve biomechanics. To simulate AR, four porcine aortic valves were explanted, and the commissure between the two largest leaflets was detached and re-implanted 5 mm lower to induce cusp prolapse. Four additional valves were tested in their native state as controls. All valves were tested in a heart simulator while hemodynamics, high-speed videography, and echocardiography data were collected. Our AR model successfully reproduced cusp prolapse with significant increase in regurgitant volume compared with that of the controls (23.2 ± 8.9 versus 2.8 ± 1.6 ml, p = 0.017). Hemodynamics data confirmed the simulation of physiologic disease conditions. Echocardiography and color flow mapping demonstrated the presence of mild to moderate eccentric regurgitation in our AR model. This novel AR model has enormous potential in the evaluation of valve biomechanics and surgical repair techniques. Graphical Abstract.

    View details for DOI 10.1007/s12265-020-10038-z

    View details for PubMedID 32495264

  • Quadrupling the N95 Supply during the COVID-19 Crisis with an Innovative 3D-Printed Mask Adaptor. Healthcare (Basel, Switzerland) Imbrie-Moore, A. M., Park, M. H., Zhu, Y., Paulsen, M. J., Wang, H., Woo, Y. J. 2020; 8 (3)

    Abstract

    The need for personal protective equipment during the COVID-19 pandemic is far outstripping our ability to manufacture and distribute these supplies to hospitals. In particular, the medical N95 mask shortage is resulting in healthcare providers reusing masks or utilizing masks with filtration properties that do not meet medical N95 standards. We developed a solution for immediate use: a mask adaptor, outfitted with a quarter section of an N95 respirator that maintains the N95 seal standard, thereby quadrupling the N95 supply. A variety of designs were 3D-printed and optimized based on the following criteria: seal efficacy, filter surface area and N95 respirator multiplicity. The final design is reusable and features a 3D-printed soft silicone base as well as a rigid 3D-printed cartridge to seal one-quarter of a 3M 1860 N95 mask. Our mask passed the computerized N95 fit test for six individuals. All files are publicly available with this publication. Our design can provide immediate support for healthcare professionals in dire need of medical N95 masks by extending the current supply by a factor of four.

    View details for DOI 10.3390/healthcare8030225

    View details for PubMedID 32717841

  • Multi-phase catheter-injectable hydrogel enables dual-stage protein-engineered cytokine release to mitigate adverse left ventricular remodeling following myocardial infarction in a small animal model and a large animal model. Cytokine Steele, A. N., Paulsen, M. J., Wang, H., Stapleton, L. M., Lucian, H. J., Eskandari, A., Hironaka, C. E., Farry, J. M., Baker, S. W., Thakore, A. D., Jaatinen, K. J., Tada, Y., Hollander, M. J., Williams, K. M., Seymour, A. J., Totherow, K. P., Yu, A. C., Cochran, J. R., Appel, E. A., Woo, Y. J. 2020; 127: 154974

    Abstract

    Although ischemic heart disease is the leading cause of death worldwide, mainstay treatments ultimately fail because they do not adequately address disease pathophysiology. Restoring the microvascular perfusion deficit remains a significant unmet need and may be addressed via delivery of pro-angiogenic cytokines. The therapeutic effect of cytokines can be enhanced by encapsulation within hydrogels, but current hydrogels do not offer sufficient clinical translatability due to unfavorable viscoelastic mechanical behavior which directly impacts the ability for minimally-invasive catheter delivery. In this report, we examine the therapeutic implications of dual-stage cytokine release from a novel, highly shear-thinning biocompatible catheter-deliverable hydrogel. We chose to encapsulate two protein-engineered cytokines, namely dimeric fragment of hepatocyte growth factor (HGFdf) and engineered stromal cell-derived factor 1α (ESA), which target distinct disease pathways. The controlled release of HGFdf and ESA from separate phases of the hyaluronic acid-based hydrogel allows extended and pronounced beneficial effects due to the precise timing of release. We evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of this treatment strategy in a small animal model of myocardial ischemia and observed a significant benefit in biological and functional parameters. Given the encouraging results from the small animal experiment, we translated this treatment to a large animal preclinical model and observed a reduction in scar size, indicating this strategy could serve as a potential adjunct therapy for the millions of people suffering from ischemic heart disease.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.cyto.2019.154974

    View details for PubMedID 31978642

  • Comprehensive Ex Vivo Comparison of 5 Clinically Used Conduit Configurations for Valve-Sparing Aortic Root Replacement Using a 3-Dimensional-Printed Heart Simulator. Circulation Paulsen, M. J., Imbrie-Moore, A. M., Baiocchi, M., Wang, H., Hironaka, C. E., Lucian, H. J., Farry, J. M., Thakore, A. D., Zhu, Y., Ma, M., MacArthur, J. W., Woo, Y. J. 2020; 142 (14): 1361–73

    Abstract

    Many graft configurations are clinically used for valve-sparing aortic root replacement, some specifically focused on recapitulating neosinus geometry. However, the specific impact of such neosinuses on valvular and root biomechanics and the potential influence on long-term durability are unknown.Using a custom 3-dimenstional-printed heart simulator with porcine aortic roots (n=5), the anticommissural plication, Stanford modification, straight graft (SG), Uni-Graft, and Valsalva graft configurations were tested in series using an incomplete counterbalanced measures design, with the native root as a control, to mitigate ordering effects. Hemodynamic and videometric data were analyzed using linear models with conduit as the fixed effect of interest and valve as a fixed nuisance effect with post hoc pairwise testing using Tukey's correction.Hemodynamics were clinically similar between grafts and control aortic roots. Regurgitant fraction varied between grafts, with SG and Uni-Graft groups having the lowest regurgitant fractions and anticommissural plication having the highest. Root distensibility was significantly lower in SG versus both control roots and all other grafts aside from the Stanford modification (P≤0.01 for each). All grafts except SG had significantly higher cusp opening velocities versus native roots (P<0.01 for each). Relative cusp opening forces were similar between SG, Uni-Graft, and control groups, whereas anticommissural plication, Stanford modification, and Valsalva grafts had significantly higher opening forces versus controls (P<0.01). Cusp closing velocities were similar between native roots and the SG group, and were significantly lower than observed in the other conduits (P≤0.01 for each). Only SG and Uni-Graft groups experienced relative cusp closing forces approaching that of the native root, whereas relative forces were >5-fold higher in the anticommissural plication, Stanford modification, and Valsalva graft groups.In this ex vivo modeling system, clinically used valve-sparing aortic root replacement conduit configurations have comparable hemodynamics but differ in biomechanical performance, with the straight graft most closely recapitulating native aortic root biomechanics.

    View details for DOI 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.120.046612

    View details for PubMedID 33017215

  • Long-term outcome of orthotopic heart transplantation in Asians: An analysis of the United Network of Organ Sharing database. The Journal of heart and lung transplantation : the official publication of the International Society for Heart Transplantation Kohsaka, S., Shudo, Y., Wang, H., Lingala, B., Kawana, M., Woo, Y. J. 2020

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.healun.2020.07.016

    View details for PubMedID 32948416

  • Mitral chordae tendineae force profile characterization using a posterior ventricular anchoring neochordal repair model for mitral regurgitation in a three-dimensional-printed ex vivo left heart simulator. European journal of cardio-thoracic surgery : official journal of the European Association for Cardio-thoracic Surgery Paulsen, M. J., Imbrie-Moore, A. M., Wang, H., Bae, J. H., Hironaka, C. E., Farry, J. M., Lucian, H. J., Thakore, A. D., MacArthur, J. W., Cutkosky, M. R., Woo, Y. J. 2019

    Abstract

    OBJECTIVES: Posterior ventricular anchoring neochordal (PVAN) repair is a non-resectional technique for correcting mitral regurgitation (MR) due to posterior leaflet prolapse, utilizing a single suture anchored in the myocardium behind the leaflet. This technique has demonstrated clinical efficacy, although a theoretical limitation is stability of the anchoring suture. We hypothesize that the PVAN suture positions the leaflet for coaptation, after which forces are distributed evenly with low repair suture forces.METHODS: Porcine mitral valves were mounted in a 3-dimensional-printed heart simulator and chordal forces, haemodynamics and echocardiography were collected at baseline, after inducing MR by severing chordae, and after PVAN repair. Repair suture forces were measured with a force-sensing post positioned to mimic in vivo suture placement. Forces required to pull the myocardial suture free were also determined.RESULTS: Relative primary and secondary chordae forces on both leaflets were elevated during prolapse (P<0.05). PVAN repair eliminated MR in all valves and normalized chordae forces to baseline levels on anterior primary (0.37±0.23 to 0.22±0.09 N, P<0.05), posterior primary (0.62±0.37 to 0.14±0.05 N, P=0.001), anterior secondary (1.48±0.52 to 0.85±0.43 N, P<0.001) and posterior secondary chordae (1.42±0.69 to 0.59±0.17 N, P=0.005). Repair suture forces were minimal, even compared to normal primary chordae forces (0.08±0.04 vs 0.19±0.08 N, P=0.002), and were 90 times smaller than maximum forces tolerated by the myocardium (0.08±0.04 vs 6.9±1.3 N, P<0.001).DISCUSSION: PVAN repair eliminates MR by positioning the posterior leaflet for coaptation, distributing forces throughout the valve. Given extremely low measured forces, the strength of the repair suture and the myocardium is not a limitation.

    View details for DOI 10.1093/ejcts/ezz258

    View details for PubMedID 31638697

  • Heart-lung transplantation with concomitant aortic arch reconstruction for Eisenmenger syndrome and type B interrupted aortic arch. The Journal of heart and lung transplantation : the official publication of the International Society for Heart Transplantation Wang, H., Shudo, Y., MacArthur, J. W., Woo, Y. J. 2019

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.healun.2019.09.002

    View details for PubMedID 31570290

  • Custom Patient-Specific Three-Dimensional Printed Mitral Valve Models for Pre-Operative Patient Education Enhance Patient Satisfaction and Understanding JOURNAL OF MEDICAL DEVICES-TRANSACTIONS OF THE ASME Hung, K. S., Paulsen, M. J., Wang, H., Hironaka, C., Woo, Y. 2019; 13 (3)

    View details for DOI 10.1115/1.4043737

    View details for Web of Science ID 000483046800013

  • Modeling conduit choice for valve-sparing aortic root replacement on biomechanics with a 3-dimensional-printed heart simulator JOURNAL OF THORACIC AND CARDIOVASCULAR SURGERY Paulsen, M. J., Kasinpila, P., Imbrie-Moore, A. M., Wang, H., Hironaka, C. E., Koyano, T. K., Fong, R., Chiu, P., Goldstone, A. B., Steele, A. N., Stapleton, L. M., Ma, M., Woo, Y. 2019; 158 (2): 392–403
  • Ex vivo biomechanical study of apical versus papillary neochord anchoring for mitral regurgitation. The Annals of thoracic surgery Imbrie-Moore, A. M., Paulsen, M. J., Thakore, A. D., Wang, H., Hironaka, C. E., Lucian, H. J., Farry, J. M., Edwards, B. B., Bae, J. H., Cutkosky, M. R., Woo, Y. J. 2019

    Abstract

    BACKGROUND: Neochordoplasty is an important repair technique, though optimal anchoring position is unknown. While typically anchored at papillary muscles, new percutaneous devices anchor the chordae at or near the ventricular apex, which may have an effect on chordal forces and the long-term durability of the repair.METHODS: Porcine mitral valves (n=6) were mounted in a left heart simulator that generates physiological pressure and flow through the valves while chordal forces were measured using Fiber Bragg Grating strain gauge sensors. Isolated mitral regurgitation was induced by cutting P2 primary chordae and the regurgitant valve was repaired using PTFE neochord with apical anchoring, followed by papillary muscle fixation for comparison. In both cases, the neochord was anchored to a customized force-sensing post positioned to mimic the relevant in vivo placement.RESULTS: Echocardiographic and hemodynamic data confirmed that the repairs restored physiologic hemodynamics. Forces on the chordae and neochord were lower for papillary fixation than the apical (p=0.003). Additionally, the maximum rate of change of force was higher for the chordae and neochord for apical fixation when compared to papillary (p=0.028).CONCLUSIONS: Apical point of anchoring results in higher forces on the chordae and neochord stitch as well as an increased rate of loading on the neochord when compared to the papillary muscle fixation. These results suggest the papillary fixation repair may have superior durability.

    View details for PubMedID 30836099

  • A Biocompatible Therapeutic Catheter-Deliverable Hydrogel for In Situ Tissue Engineering. Advanced healthcare materials Steele, A. N., Stapleton, L. M., Farry, J. M., Lucian, H. J., Paulsen, M. J., Eskandari, A., Hironaka, C. E., Thakore, A. D., Wang, H., Yu, A. C., Chan, D., Appel, E. A., Woo, Y. J. 2019: e1801147

    Abstract

    Hydrogels have emerged as a diverse class of biomaterials offering a broad range of biomedical applications. Specifically, injectable hydrogels are advantageous for minimally invasive delivery of various therapeutics and have great potential to treat a number of diseases. However, most current injectable hydrogels are limited by difficult and time-consuming fabrication techniques and are unable to be delivered through long, narrow catheters, preventing extensive clinical translation. Here, the development of an easily-scaled, catheter-injectable hydrogel utilizing a polymer-nanoparticle crosslinking mechanism is reported, which exhibits notable shear-thinning and self-healing behavior. Gelation of the hydrogel occurs immediately upon mixing the biochemically modified hyaluronic acid polymer with biodegradable nanoparticles and can be easily injected through a high-gauge syringe due to the dynamic nature of the strong, yet reversible crosslinks. Furthermore, the ability to deliver this novel hydrogel through a long, narrow, physiologically-relevant catheter affixed with a 28-G needle is highlighted, with hydrogel mechanics unchanged after delivery. Due to the composition of the gel, it is demonstrated that therapeutics can be differentially released with distinct elution profiles, allowing precise control over drug delivery. Finally, the cell-signaling and biocompatibility properties of this innovative hydrogel are demonstrated, revealing its wide range of therapeutic applications.

    View details for PubMedID 30714355

  • Cardioaortic replacement for a ruptured root pseudoaneurysm with pulsatile subcutaneous extension. European journal of cardio-thoracic surgery : official journal of the European Association for Cardio-thoracic Surgery Wang, H., Shudo, Y., Hittinger, S. A., Woo, Y. J. 2019

    Abstract

    Orthotopic heart transplantation with concomitant aortic surgery is rarely performed. Herein, we describe the successful management of a patient with an otherwise inoperable, ruptured aortic root pseudoaneurysm using combined cardioaortic replacement under hypothermic circulatory arrest.

    View details for PubMedID 30608529

  • Evaluation of Risk Factors for Heart-Lung Transplant Recipient Outcome: An Analysis of the United Network for Organ Sharing Database. Circulation Shudo, Y., Wang, H., Lingala, B., He, H., Kim, F. Y., Hiesinger, W., Lee, A. M., Boyd, J. H., Currie, M., Woo, Y. J. 2019; 140 (15): 1261–72

    Abstract

    Heart-lung transplantation (HLTx) is an effective treatment for patients with advanced cardiopulmonary failure. However, no large multicenter study has focused on the relationship between donor and recipient risk factors and post-HLTx outcomes. Thus, we investigated this issue using data from the United Network for Organ Sharing database.All adult patients (age ≥18 years) registered in the United Network for Organ Sharing database who underwent HLTx between 1987 and 2017 were included (n=997). We stratified the cohort by patients who were alive without retransplant at 1 year (n=664) and patients who died or underwent retransplant within 1 year of HLTx (n=333). The primary outcome was the influence of donor and recipient characteristics on 1-year post-HLTx recipient death or retransplant. Kaplan-Meier curves were created to assess overall freedom from death or retransplant. To obtain a better effect estimation on hazard and survival time, the parametric Accelerated Failure Time model was chosen to perform time-to-event modeling analyses.Overall graft survival at 1-year post-HLTx was 66.6%. Of donors, 53% were male, and the mean age was 28.2 years. Univariable analysis showed advanced donor age, recipient male sex, recipient creatinine, recipient history of prior cardiac or lung surgery, recipient extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support, transplant year, and transplant center volume were associated with 1-year post-HLTx death or retransplant. On multivariable analysis, advanced donor age (hazard ratio [HR], 1.017; P=0.0007), recipient male sex (HR, 1.701; P=0.0002), recipient extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support (HR, 4.854; P<0.0001), transplant year (HR, 0.962; P<0.0001), and transplantation at low-volume (HR, 1.694) and medium-volume centers (HR, 1.455) in comparison with high-volume centers (P=0.0007) remained as significant predictors of death or retransplant. These predictors were incorporated into an equation capable of estimating the preliminary probability of graft survival at 1-year post-HLTx on the basis of preoperative factors alone.HLTx outcomes may be improved by considering the strong influence of donor age, recipient sex, recipient hemodynamic status, and transplant center volume. Marginal donors and recipients without significant factors contributing to poor post-HLTx outcomes may still be considered for transplantation, potentially with less impact on the risk of early postoperative death or retransplant.

    View details for DOI 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.119.040682

    View details for PubMedID 31589491

  • Vascularization of Engineered Spatially Patterned Myocardial Tissue Derived From Human Pluripotent Stem Cells in vivo. Frontiers in bioengineering and biotechnology Wanjare, M., Kawamura, M., Hu, C., Alcazar, C., Wang, H., Woo, Y. J., Huang, N. F. 2019; 7: 208

    Abstract

    Tissue engineering approaches to regenerate myocardial tissue after disease or injury is promising. Integration with the host vasculature is critical to the survival and therapeutic efficacy of engineered myocardial tissues. To create more physiologically oriented engineered myocardial tissue with organized cellular arrangements and endothelial interactions, randomly oriented or parallel-aligned microfibrous polycaprolactone scaffolds were seeded with human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (iCMs) and/or endothelial cells (iECs). The resultant engineered myocardial tissues were assessed in a subcutaneous transplantation model and in a myocardial injury model to evaluate the effect of scaffold anisotropy and endothelial interactions on vascular integration of the engineered myocardial tissue. Here we demonstrated that engineered myocardial tissue composed of randomly oriented scaffolds seeded with iECs promoted the survival of iECs for up to 14 days. However, engineered myocardial tissue composed of aligned scaffolds preferentially guided the organization of host capillaries along the direction of the microfibers. In a myocardial injury model, epicardially transplanted engineered myocardial tissues composed of randomly oriented scaffolds seeded with iCMs augmented microvessel formation leading to a significantly higher arteriole density after 4 weeks, compared to engineered tissues derived from aligned scaffolds. These findings that the scaffold microtopography imparts differential effect on revascularization, in which randomly oriented scaffolds promote pro-survival and pro-angiogenic effects, and aligned scaffolds direct the formation of anisotropic vessels. These findings suggest a dominant role of scaffold topography over endothelial co-culture in modulating cellular survival, vascularization, and microvessel architecture.

    View details for DOI 10.3389/fbioe.2019.00208

    View details for PubMedID 31552234

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC6733921

  • Development and ex vivo validation of novel force-sensing neochordae for measuring chordae tendineae tension in the mitral valve apparatus using optical fibers with embedded Bragg gratings. Journal of biomechanical engineering Paulsen, M. J., Bae, J. H., Imbrie-Moore, A., Wang, H., Hironaka, C., Farry, J. M., Lucian, H., Thakore, A., Cutkosky, M. R., Woo, Y. J. 2019

    Abstract

    Few technologies exist that can provide quantitative data on forces within the mitral valve apparatus. Marker-based strain measurements can be performed, but chordal geometry and restricted optical access are limitations. Foil-based strain sensors have been described and work well, but the sensor footprint limits the number of chordae that can be measured. We instead utilized Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors-optical strain gauges made of 125µm diameter silica fibers- to overcome some limitations of previous methods of measuring chordae tendineae forces. Using FBG sensors, we created a force-sensing neochord that mimics the natural shape and movement of native chordae. FBG sensors reflect a specific wavelength of light depending on the spatial period of gratings. When force is applied, the gratings move relative to one another, shifting the wavelength of reflected light. This shift is directly proportional to force applied. The FBG sensors were housed in a protective sheath fashioned from a 0.025" flat coil, and attached to the chordae using polytetrafluoroethylene suture. The function of the force-sensing neochordae was validated in a 3D-printed left heart simulator, which demonstrated that FBG sensors provide highly sensitive force measurements of mitral valve chordae at a temporal resolution of 1000 Hz. As ventricular pressures increased, such as in hypertension, chordae forces also increased. Overall, FBG sensors are a viable, durable, and high-fidelity sensing technology that can be effectively used to measure mitral valve chordae forces and overcome some limitations of other such technologies.

    View details for DOI 10.1115/1.4044142

    View details for PubMedID 31253992

  • Utilization of Del Nido Cardioplegia in Adult Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting - A Retrospective Analysis. Circulation journal : official journal of the Japanese Circulation Society O'Donnell, C., Wang, H., Tran, P., Miller, S., Shuttleworth, P., Boyd, J. H. 2018

    Abstract

    BACKGROUND: Studies assessing the safety and effectiveness of Del Nido cardioplegia for adult cardiac surgery remain limited. We investigated early outcomes after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) using single-dose Del Nido cardioplegia vs. conventional multi-dose blood cardioplegia. Methods and Results: The 81 consecutive patients underwent isolated CABG performed by a single surgeon. The initial 27 patients received anterograde blood cardioplegia, while the subsequent 54 patients received anterograde Del Nido cardioplegia. There were no differences in the baseline characteristics of each group nor any differences in the 30-day incidences of myocardial infarction, all-cause death, and readmission following surgery. The use of Del Nido cardioplegia was associated with shorter cardiopulmonary bypass time (98 vs. 115 min, P=0.011), shorter cross-clamp time (74 vs. 87 min, P=0.006), and decreased need for intraoperative defibrillation (13.0% vs. 33.3%, P=0.030) compared with blood cardioplegia. To control for the difference in cross-clamp time, we performed propensity score matching with a logistical treatment model and confirmed that Del Nido cardioplegia provided similar outcomes as blood cardioplegia and also reduced the need for defibrillation independent of cross-clamp time.CONCLUSIONS: Compared with conventional blood cardioplegia, Del Nido cardioplegia provided excellent myocardial protection with reduced need for intraoperative defibrillation, shorter bypass and cross-clamp times, and comparable early clinical outcomes for adult patients undergoing CABG.

    View details for PubMedID 30531128

  • How to start a successful robotic mitral surgery program: It's not just about the surgery! JOURNAL OF THORACIC AND CARDIOVASCULAR SURGERY Wang, H., Boyd, J. H. 2018; 155 (4): 1472–73

    View details for PubMedID 29317089

  • Heart transplant after profoundly extended ambulatory central venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. The Journal of thoracic and cardiovascular surgery Shudo, Y., Wang, H., Ha, R. V., Hayes, A. D., Woo, Y. J. 2018

    View details for PubMedID 29576264

  • Second Arterial Versus Venous Conduits for Multivessel Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery in California. Circulation Goldstone, A. B., Chiu, P., Baiocchi, M., Wang, H., Lingala, B., Boyd, J. H., Woo, Y. J. 2018; 137 (16): 1698–1707

    Abstract

    Whether a second arterial conduit improves outcomes after multivessel coronary artery bypass grafting remains unclear. Consequently, arterial conduits other than the left internal thoracic artery are seldom used in the United States.Using a state-maintained clinical registry including all 126 nonfederal hospitals in California, we compared all-cause mortality and rates of stroke, myocardial infarction, repeat revascularization, and sternal wound infection between propensity score-matched cohorts who underwent primary, isolated multivessel coronary artery bypass grafting with the left internal thoracic artery, and who received a second arterial conduit (right internal thoracic artery or radial artery, n=5866) or a venous conduit (n=53 566) between 2006 and 2011. Propensity score matching using 34 preoperative characteristics yielded 5813 matched sets. A subgroup analysis compared outcomes between propensity score-matched recipients of a right internal thoracic artery (n=1576) or a radial artery (n=4290).Second arterial conduit use decreased from 10.7% in 2006 to 9.1% in 2011 (P<0.0001). However, receipt of a second arterial conduit was associated with significantly lower mortality (13.1% versus 10.6% at 7 years; hazard ratio, 0.79; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.72-0.87), and lower risks of myocardial infarction (hazard ratio, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.70-0.87) and repeat revascularization (hazard ratio, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.76-0.88). In comparison with radial artery grafts, right internal thoracic artery grafts were associated with similar mortality rates (right internal thoracic artery 10.3% versus radial artery 10.7% at 7 years; hazard ratio, 1.10; 95% CI, 0.89-1.37) and individual risks of cardiovascular events, but the risk of sternal wound infection was increased (risk difference, 1.07%; 95% CI, 0.15-2.07).Second arterial conduit use in California is low and declining, but arterial grafts were associated with significantly lower mortality and fewer cardiovascular events. A right internal thoracic artery graft offered no benefit over that of a radial artery, but did increase risk of sternal wound infection. These findings suggest surgeons should consider lowering their threshold for using arterial grafts, and the radial artery may be the preferred second conduit.

    View details for PubMedID 29242351

  • Rapid Self-Assembly of Bioengineered Cardiovascular Bypass Grafts From Scaffold-Stabilized, Tubular Bilevel Cell Sheets. Circulation von Bornstädt, D., Wang, H., Paulsen, M. J., Goldstone, A. B., Eskandari, A., Thakore, A., Stapleton, L., Steele, A. N., Truong, V. N., Jaatinen, K., Hironaka, C., Woo, Y. J. 2018; 138 (19): 2130–44

    Abstract

    Cardiovascular bypass grafting is an essential treatment for complex cases of atherosclerotic disease. Because the availability of autologous arterial and venous conduits is patient-limited, self-assembled cell-only grafts have been developed to serve as functional conduits with off-the-shelf availability. The unacceptably long production time required to generate these conduits, however, currently limits their clinical utility. Here, we introduce a novel technique to significantly accelerate the production process of self-assembled engineered vascular conduits.Human aortic smooth muscle cells and skin fibroblasts were used to construct bilevel cell sheets. Cell sheets were wrapped around a 22.5-gauge Angiocath needle to form tubular vessel constructs. A thin, flexible membrane of clinically approved biodegradable tissue glue (Dermabond Advanced) served as a temporary, external scaffold, allowing immediate perfusion and endothelialization of the vessel construct in a bioreactor. Subsequently, the matured vascular conduits were used as femoral artery interposition grafts in rats (n=20). Burst pressure, vasoreactivity, flow dynamics, perfusion, graft patency, and histological structure were assessed.Compared with engineered vascular conduits formed without external stabilization, glue membrane-stabilized conduits reached maturity in the bioreactor in one-fifth the time. After only 2 weeks of perfusion, the matured conduits exhibited flow dynamics similar to that of control arteries, as well as physiological responses to vasoconstricting and vasodilating drugs. The matured conduits had burst pressures exceeding 500 mm Hg and had sufficient mechanical stability for surgical anastomoses. The patency rate of implanted conduits at 8 weeks was 100%, with flow rate and hind-limb perfusion similar to those of sham controls. Grafts explanted after 8 weeks showed a histological structure resembling that of typical arteries, including intima, media, adventitia, and internal and external elastic membrane layers.Our technique reduces the production time of self-assembled, cell sheet-derived engineered vascular conduits to 2 weeks, thereby permitting their use as bypass grafts within the clinical time window for elective cardiovascular surgery. Furthermore, our method uses only clinically approved materials and can be adapted to various cell sources, simplifying the path toward future clinical translation.

    View details for PubMedID 30474423

  • Tissue-engineered smooth muscle cell and endothelial progenitor cell bi-level cell sheets prevent progression of cardiac dysfunction, microvascular dysfunction, and interstitial fibrosis in a rodent model of type 1 diabetes-induced cardiomyopathy. Cardiovascular diabetology Kawamura, M., Paulsen, M. J., Goldstone, A. B., Shudo, Y., Wang, H., Steele, A. N., Stapleton, L. M., Edwards, B. B., Eskandari, A., Truong, V. N., Jaatinen, K. J., Ingason, A. B., Miyagawa, S., Sawa, Y., Woo, Y. J. 2017; 16 (1): 142

    Abstract

    Diabetes mellitus is a risk factor for coronary artery disease and diabetic cardiomyopathy, and adversely impacts outcomes following coronary artery bypass grafting. Current treatments focus on macro-revascularization and neglect the microvascular disease typical of diabetes mellitus-induced cardiomyopathy (DMCM). We hypothesized that engineered smooth muscle cell (SMC)-endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) bi-level cell sheets could improve ventricular dysfunction in DMCM.Primary mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and EPCs were isolated from the bone marrow of Wistar rats, and MSCs were differentiated into SMCs by culturing on a fibronectin-coated dish. SMCs topped with EPCs were detached from a temperature-responsive culture dish to create an SMC-EPC bi-level cell sheet. A DMCM model was induced by intraperitoneal streptozotocin injection. Four weeks after induction, rats were randomized into 3 groups: control (no DMCM induction), untreated DMCM, and treated DMCM (cell sheet transplant covering the anterior surface of the left ventricle).SMC-EPC cell sheet therapy preserved cardiac function and halted adverse ventricular remodeling, as demonstrated by echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging at 8 weeks after DMCM induction. Myocardial contrast echocardiography demonstrated that myocardial perfusion and microvascular function were preserved in the treatment group compared with untreated animals. Histological analysis demonstrated decreased interstitial fibrosis and increased microvascular density in the SMC-EPC cell sheet-treated group.Treatment of DMCM with tissue-engineered SMC-EPC bi-level cell sheets prevented cardiac dysfunction and microvascular disease associated with DMCM. This multi-lineage cellular therapy is a novel, translatable approach to improve microvascular disease and prevent heart failure in diabetic patients.

    View details for PubMedID 29096622

  • Sodium tanshinone IIA sulfate adjunct therapy reduces high-sensitivity C-reactive protein level in coronary artery disease patients: a randomized controlled trial. Scientific reports Li, S., Jiao, Y., Wang, H., Shang, Q., Lu, F., Huang, L., Liu, J., Xu, H., Chen, K. 2017; 7 (1): 17451

    Abstract

    High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) is independently associated with cardiovascular events in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients and reducing the hs-CRP level may further benefit this population. We conduct this parallel design, randomized-controlled trial to assess the effectiveness of adjunct sodium tanshinone IIA sulfate (STS) therapy on circulating inflammation markers in CAD patients. Unstable angina or non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients with increased hs-CRP level were randomly assigned to atorvastatin-based standard medical therapy or standard therapy plus STS injection (80 mg, once daily for 14 consecutive days). The primary outcome was hs-CRP level. After the 14-day treatment, the experimental group (n = 35) exhibited significantly lower levels of hs-CRP than the control group (n = 35) (1.72 vs 3.20 mg/L, p = 0.0191). Lower levels of interleukin-6, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), and soluble CD40 ligand were also observed in the experimental group. Angina symptoms were also better controlled in the experimental group. At 30 days after treatment completion, MCP-1 levels remained lower in the experimental group than in the control group (313.88 vs 337.91 pg/mL, p = 0.0078). No serious adverse events occurred. Our study demonstrates that on the basis of standard medical therapy, STS further reduce elevated hs-CRP and other circulating inflammation markers in CAD patients. (Chictr.org number: ChiCTR-TRC-12002361).

    View details for PubMedID 29234038

  • A modified technique for orthotopic heart transplantation to minimize warm ischaemic time. European journal of cardio-thoracic surgery : official journal of the European Association for Cardio-thoracic Surgery Shudo, Y., Wang, H., Woo, Y. J. 2017

    Abstract

    Prolonged allograft ischaemic time in heart transplantation adversely impacts the performance of the donor heart in the immediate postoperative period and ultimately results in decreased post-transplant survival. Therefore, optimal surgical technique for heart transplantation should aim to minimize allograft ischaemic time. Here, we report a case of successful orthotopic heart transplantation using a modified technique to reduce allograft ischaemic time and warm ischaemic time.

    View details for PubMedID 29186382

  • Bloodless Repair of Isolated Pulmonary Artery in a Neonate. World journal for pediatric & congenital heart surgery Wang, H., Brewer, M. P., Lai, W. W., Krishnamurthy, G., Chai, P. J. 2016; 7 (1): 112-115

    Abstract

    Pediatric cardiac surgery, especially for small neonates, typically requires blood products to counter hemodilution during cardiopulmonary bypass. Children with congenital heart defects whose families adhere to faith-based proscriptions against blood transfusion therefore represent a challenging surgical population. Here, we report the case of a ten-day-old, 3.6-kg patient of Jehovah's Witness faith, who was diagnosed with unilateral pulmonary artery discontinuity, bilateral patent ductus arteriosus, and an otherwise structurally normal heart. Pulmonary artery reimplantation was successfully performed without giving blood products. This case adds to previous reports of successful bloodless cardiac surgery in neonates and describes the specific strategies that contributed to successful pulmonary artery reimplantation.

    View details for DOI 10.1177/2150135115582071

    View details for PubMedID 26715005

  • Delayed gastric emptying after living donor hepatectomy for liver transplantation. Case reports in transplantation Wang, H., Griesemer, A. D., Parsons, R. F., Graham, J. A., Emond, J. C., Samstein, B. 2014; 2014: 582183-?

    Abstract

    Delayed gastric emptying is a significant postoperative complication of living donor hepatectomy for liver transplantation and may require endoscopic or surgical intervention in severe cases. Although the mechanism of posthepatectomy delayed gastric emptying remains unknown, vagal nerve injury during intraoperative dissection and adhesion formation postoperatively between the stomach and cut liver surface are possible explanations. Here, we present the first reported case of delayed gastric emptying following fully laparoscopic hepatectomy for living donor liver transplantation. Additionally, we also present a case in which symptoms developed after open right hepatectomy, but for which dissection for left hepatectomy was first performed. Through our experience and these two specific cases, we favor a neurovascular etiology for delayed gastric emptying after hepatectomy.

    View details for DOI 10.1155/2014/582183

    View details for PubMedID 25610698

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC4291134

  • The Effect of Sodium Tanshinone IIA Sulfate and Simvastatin on Elevated Serum Levels of Inflammatory Markers in Patients with Coronary Heart Disease: A Study Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial EVIDENCE-BASED COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE Shang, Q., Wang, H., Li, S., Xu, H. 2013

    Abstract

    Background. Coronary heart disease (CHD) due to atherosclerotic inflammation remains a significant threat to global health despite the success of the lipid-lowering, anti-inflammatory statins. Tanshinone IIA, a potent anti-inflammatory compound derived from Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), may be able to supplement statins by further reducing levels of circulating inflammatory markers correlated to cardiovascular risk. Here, we present the protocol of a randomized controlled trial (RCT) that will investigate the synergistic effect of sodium tanshinone IIA sulfate and simvastatin on reducing elevated inflammatory markers in patients with CHD.Seventy-two inpatients with confirmed CHD, elevated serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (Hs-CRP) level, and a TCM diagnosis of blood stasis syndrome will be enrolled and randomized 1 : 1 into the control or experimental group. Intervention. All subjects will receive a standard Western therapy including 20 mg simvastatin orally once per evening. Patients in the experimental group will additionally receive a daily 80 mg dose of sodium tanshinone IIA sulfate intravenously, diluted into 250 mL 0.9% NaCl solution. The treatment period will be 14 days. Outcomes. Primary outcome parameter: serum Hs-CRP level. Secondary outcome parameters: other circulating inflammatory markers (including IL-6, TNF α , VCAM-1, CD40, sCD40L, MCP-1, and MMP-9), improvement in symptoms of angina and blood stasis syndrome, and safety. This trial is registered with ChiCTR-TRC-12002361.

    View details for DOI 10.1155/2013/756519

    View details for Web of Science ID 000323265300001

    View details for PubMedID 23983803

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC3747599

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