Bio

Clinical Focus


  • Internal Medicine
  • Immunology and Rheumatology
  • Allergy and Immunology

Academic Appointments


Professional Education


  • Medical Education:Yale University School of Medicine (1949) CT
  • Fellowship:Yale University School of Medicine (1947) CT
  • Residency:Montefiore Medical Center/Albert Einstein COM (1955) NY
  • Internship:Montefiore Medical Center/Albert Einstein COM (1953) NY
  • Fellowship:National Research Council (1950) Denmark

Research & Scholarship

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


Same as short description.

Teaching

2013-14 Courses


Publications

Journal Articles


  • The discovery of autoantibody to deoxyribonucleic acid LUPUS Holman, H. 2011; 20 (5): 441-442

    View details for DOI 10.1177/0961203310392433

    View details for Web of Science ID 000290213800001

    View details for PubMedID 21339243

  • The inadequacy of medical education. Chronic illness Holman, H. R. 2009; 5 (1): 18-20

    View details for DOI 10.1177/1742395309102241

    View details for PubMedID 19276222

  • What should be incentivized in care of chronic illness? Chronic illness Holman, H. R. 2007; 3 (3): 194-195

    View details for PubMedID 18083673

  • Health savings accounts--the avoidance of solution. The Pharos of Alpha Omega Alpha-Honor Medical Society. Alpha Omega Alpha Holman, H. R. 2007; 70 (2): 16-17

    View details for PubMedID 17583149

  • Chronic disease and the healthcare crisis. Chronic illness Holman, H. R. 2005; 1 (4): 265-274

    View details for PubMedID 17152451

  • Chronic disease - The need for a new clinical education JAMA-JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION Holman, H. 2004; 292 (9): 1057-1059

    View details for Web of Science ID 000223568700019

    View details for PubMedID 15339897

  • Patient self-management: A key to effectiveness and efficiency in care of chronic disease PUBLIC HEALTH REPORTS Holman, H., Loric, K. 2004; 119 (3): 239-243

    View details for Web of Science ID 000223958000003

    View details for PubMedID 15158102

  • Chronic disease self-management program - 2-year health status and health care utilization outcomes MEDICAL CARE Lorig, K. R., Ritter, P., Stewart, A. L., Sobel, D. S., Brown, B. W., Bandura, A., Gonzalez, V. M., Laurent, D. D., Holman, H. R. 2001; 39 (11): 1217-1223

    Abstract

    To assess the 1- and 2-year health status, health care utilization and self-efficacy outcomes for the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP). The major hypothesis is that during the 2-year period CDSMP participants will experience improvements or less deterioration than expected in health status and reductions in health care utilization.Longitudinal design as follow-up to a randomized trial.Community.Eight hundred thirty-one participants 40 years and older with heart disease, lung disease, stroke, or arthritis participated in the CDSMP. At 1- and 2-year intervals respectively 82% and 76% of eligible participants completed data.Health status (self-rated health, disability, social/role activities limitations, energy/fatigue, and health distress), health care utilization (ER/outpatient visits, times hospitalized, and days in hospital), and perceived self-efficacy were measured.Compared with baseline for each of the 2 years, ER/outpatient visits and health distress were reduced (P <0.05). Self-efficacy improved (P <0.05). The rate of increase is that which is expected in 1 year. There were no other significant changes.A low-cost program for promoting health self-management can improve elements of health status while reducing health care costs in populations with diverse chronic diseases.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000171821000008

    View details for PubMedID 11606875

  • Evidence suggesting that a chronic disease self-management program can improve health status while reducing hospitalization - A randomized trial MEDICAL CARE Lorig, K. R., Sobel, D. S., Stewart, A. L., Brown, B. W., Bandura, A., Ritter, P., Gonzalez, V. M., Laurent, D. D., Holman, H. R. 1999; 37 (1): 5-14

    Abstract

    This study evaluated the effectiveness (changes in health behaviors, health status, and health service utilization) of a self-management program for chronic disease designed for use with a heterogeneous group of chronic disease patients. It also explored the differential effectiveness of the intervention for subjects with specific diseases and comorbidities.The study was a six-month randomized, controlled trial at community-based sites comparing treatment subjects with wait-list control subjects. Participants were 952 patients 40 years of age or older with a physician-confirmed diagnosis of heart disease, lung disease, stroke, or arthritis. Health behaviors, health status, and health service utilization, as determined by mailed, self-administered questionnaires, were measured.Treatment subjects, when compared with control subjects, demonstrated improvements at 6 months in weekly minutes of exercise, frequency of cognitive symptom management, communication with physicians, self-reported health, health distress, fatigue, disability, and social/role activities limitations. They also had fewer hospitalizations and days in the hospital. No differences were found in pain/physical discomfort, shortness of breath, or psychological well-being.An intervention designed specifically to meet the needs of a heterogeneous group of chronic disease patients, including those with comorbid conditions, was feasible and beneficial beyond usual care in terms of improved health behaviors and health status. It also resulted in fewer hospitalizations and days of hospitalization.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000077870400002

    View details for PubMedID 10413387

  • Arthritis self-efficacy scales measure self-efficacy ARTHRITIS CARE AND RESEARCH Lorig, K., Holman, H. 1998; 11 (3): 155-157

    View details for Web of Science ID 000075123400001

    View details for PubMedID 9782806

  • Overcoming barriers to successful aging - Self-management of osteoarthritis WESTERN JOURNAL OF MEDICINE Holman, H. R., Lorig, K. R. 1997; 167 (4): 265-268

    View details for Web of Science ID A1997YB46400012

    View details for PubMedID 9348758

  • An unbecoming act. Arthritis care and research Holman, H. R. 1996; 9 (4): 255-256

    View details for PubMedID 8997911

  • THOUGHT BARRIERS TO UNDERSTANDING RHEUMATIC DISEASES ARTHRITIS AND RHEUMATISM Holman, H. R. 1994; 37 (11): 1565-1572

    View details for Web of Science ID A1994PQ61500001

    View details for PubMedID 7980665

  • EVIDENCE SUGGESTING THAT HEALTH-EDUCATION FOR SELF-MANAGEMENT IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC ARTHRITIS HAS SUSTAINED HEALTH BENEFITS WHILE REDUCING HEALTH-CARE COSTS ARTHRITIS AND RHEUMATISM Lorig, K. R., Mazonson, P. D., Holman, H. R. 1993; 36 (4): 439-446

    Abstract

    To determine the effects of the Arthritis Self-Management Program 4 years after participation in it.Valid self-administered instruments were used to measure health status, psychological states, and health service utilization.Pain had declined a mean of 20% and visits to physicians 40%, while physical disability had increased 9%. Comparison groups did not show similar changes. Estimated 4-year savings were $648 per rheumatoid arthritis patient and $189 per osteoarthritis patient.Health education in chronic arthritis may add significant and sustained benefits to conventional therapy while reducing costs.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1993KW02600002

    View details for PubMedID 8457219

  • ARTHRITIS SELF-MANAGEMENT STUDIES - A 12-YEAR REVIEW HEALTH EDUCATION QUARTERLY Lorig, K., Holman, H. 1993; 20 (1): 17-28

    View details for Web of Science ID A1993KM03500003

    View details for PubMedID 8444622

  • QUALITATIVE INQUIRY IN MEDICAL-RESEARCH JOURNAL OF CLINICAL EPIDEMIOLOGY Holman, H. R. 1993; 46 (1): 29-36

    View details for Web of Science ID A1993KL95600005

    View details for PubMedID 8433110

  • WHATS PREVENTING MORE PREVENTION - BARRIERS TO DEVELOPMENT AT ACADEMIC MEDICAL-CENTERS JOURNAL OF GENERAL INTERNAL MEDICINE Gottlieb, L. K., Holman, H. R. 1992; 7 (6): 630-635

    Abstract

    To determine the views of leaders in academic medicine concerning the need for programs in preventive medicine (PM) and the prevailing barriers to program development.Structured interviews.Medical schools of the United States.90% of deans and chairpersons of departments of medicine and preventive medicine.None.91% considered academic PM underdeveloped and 100% considered their own programs average or worse. Identified barriers to development included funding constraints, academic partiality to biomedicine, inadequate quality of preventive medicine research and faculty, public preferences for technologic care, and organization of academic medical centers (AMCs). While 80% perceived a shortage of able PM faculty and 60% considered PM research quality to be inadequate, only 12% of PM units gave research training high priority. While 95% of respondents held that AMCs should develop community programs and 75% identified social problems as a cause of chronic diseases, 65% agreed that community programs are not considered scholarly. Only 23% of PM units gave community service high priority.A policy contradiction exists: academic leadership agreed on the problems and needed changes in PM, yet the problems were often attributed to nonacademic sources, particularly finding and public preferences, and current academic practices commonly fail to address recognized developmental barriers within academic institutions. A chain of barriers is apparent. Breaking the chain may require a change in our understanding of the role of prevention.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1992JZ45200009

    View details for PubMedID 1453247

  • LONG-TERM OUTCOMES OF AN ARTHRITIS SELF-MANAGEMENT STUDY - EFFECTS OF REINFORCEMENT EFFORTS SOCIAL SCIENCE & MEDICINE Lorig, K., Holman, H. R. 1989; 29 (2): 221-224

    Abstract

    An underlying assumption of self-care interventions is that they are most effective when reinforced. To test this assumption, 8 months after baseline, 589 subjects who had taken a 6-week Arthritis Self-management Course (ASMC) were randomized to (1) receive a bi-monthly arthritis newsletter, (2) attend a new 6-week Arthritis Reinforcement Course (ARC) or (3) receive no reinforcement. Between 8 and 20 months there were no significant differences among the three randomized groups. The results were unaltered by inclusion of assumed data of no change for the 46 subjects who did not complete the full 20-month study. Between baseline and 20 months all participants reduced their pain by 20%, depression by 14%, and visits to physicians by 35% (P less than 0.01). There were no trends toward loss of these effects over time. These findings indicate that the effects of a self-care intervention were sustained over 20 months and that the tested forms of reinforcement did not alter those effects.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1989AB72800012

    View details for PubMedID 2665110

  • THE BENEFICIAL OUTCOMES OF THE ARTHRITIS SELF-MANAGEMENT COURSE ARE NOT ADEQUATELY EXPLAINED BY BEHAVIOR-CHANGE ARTHRITIS AND RHEUMATISM Lorig, K., Seleznick, M., Lubeck, D., Ung, E., CHASTAIN, R. L., Holman, H. R. 1989; 32 (1): 91-95

    Abstract

    Evaluation of the Arthritis Self-Management Course revealed significant positive changes in the practice of behaviors that were taught and in health outcomes. However, utilizing a variety of statistical techniques, we were able to demonstrate only weak associations between changes in behavior and changes in health status. This suggests the need to examine the mechanisms by which health education affects health status.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1989R917000015

    View details for PubMedID 2912467

  • DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION OF A SCALE TO MEASURE PERCEIVED SELF-EFFICACY IN PEOPLE WITH ARTHRITIS ARTHRITIS AND RHEUMATISM Lorig, K., CHASTAIN, R. L., Ung, E., Shoor, S., Holman, H. R. 1989; 32 (1): 37-44

    Abstract

    There is evidence that the psychological attribute of perceived self-efficacy plays a role in mediating health outcomes for persons with chronic arthritis who take the Arthritis Self-Management Course. An instrument to measure perceived self-efficacy was developed through consultation with patients and physicians and through study of 4 groups of patients. Tests of construct and concurrent validity and of reliability showed that the instrument met appropriate standards. Health outcomes and self-efficacy scores improved during the Arthritis Self-Management Course, and the improvements were correlated.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1989R917000006

    View details for PubMedID 2912463

  • Improving health service performance by modifying medical practices. Transactions of the Association of American Physicians Holman, H., Lubeck, D., Dutton, D., Brown, B. W. 1988; 101: 173-179

    View details for PubMedID 3269676

  • THE IMPACT OF RHEUMATOID-ARTHRITIS AND OSTEOARTHRITIS - THE ACTIVITIES OF PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID-ARTHRITIS AND OSTEOARTHRITIS COMPARED TO CONTROLS JOURNAL OF RHEUMATOLOGY Yelin, E., Lubeck, D., Holman, H., Epstein, W. 1987; 14 (4): 710-717

    Abstract

    We measured the impact of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA) by comparing the activities of patients with these illnesses to controls matched for age, sex, and community of residence. Our results indicate that patients with RA experience more losses than controls in every domain of human activity and that patients with OA experience more losses in the performance of household chores, shopping and errands, and leisure activities. The methods described here provide a simple, reliable way to assess the impacts of illness in the same terms for all dimensions of human activity.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1987K037600013

    View details for PubMedID 3668977

Conference Proceedings


  • HEALTH-EDUCATION FOR SELF-MANAGEMENT HAS SIGNIFICANT EARLY AND SUSTAINED BENEFITS IN CHRONIC ARTHRITIS Holman, H., MAZONSON, P., Lorig, K. ASSOC AMER PHYSICIANS. 1989: 204-208

    View details for Web of Science ID A1989BQ46H00024

    View details for PubMedID 2517854

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