Bio

Honors & Awards


  • Laureate, American College of Physicians (2002)
  • Recipient, Albion Walter Hewlett Award (1995)
  • Member, American Clinical and Climatological Association (1994)
  • Founding Editor in Chief, Scientific American Medicine (1977-1993)
  • Member, American Physical Society (1992)
  • Fellow, Royal Society of Medicine (1992)
  • Fellow, American Association for the Advancement of Science (1992)
  • Henry Kaiser Award, Stanford University (1989)
  • Master, American College of Physicians (1987)
  • Member, Gordon Conference, Atherosclerosis and Imaging (Synchrotron), Meriden, NH (1985)
  • Member, Society of Photo-Optical Engineers (1981)
  • Member, Institute of Medicine (NAS) (1981)
  • Diplomate, American Board of Internal Medicne (1954)
  • Recipient, Alpha Omega Alpha Award (1946)

Research & Scholarship

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


Acquired disorders of protein assembly, especially those involving the displacement of proline by its lower homologue, azetidine-2-carboxylic acid.
Disorders arising from proline displacement in myelin basic protein (multiple sclerosis), hemoglobin, profilin, ion channels, hypoxia inducible factor, synaptic vesicles.

Publications

Journal Articles


  • Proline: The Distribution, Frequency, Positioning, and Common Functional Roles of Proline and Polyproline Sequences in the Human Proteome PLOS ONE Morgan, A. A., Rubenstein, E. 2013; 8 (1)

    Abstract

    Proline is an anomalous amino acid. Its nitrogen atom is covalently locked within a ring, thus it is the only proteinogenic amino acid with a constrained phi angle. Sequences of three consecutive prolines can fold into polyproline helices, structures that join alpha helices and beta pleats as architectural motifs in protein configuration. Triproline helices are participants in protein-protein signaling interactions. Longer spans of repeat prolines also occur, containing as many as 27 consecutive proline residues. Little is known about the frequency, positioning, and functional significance of these proline sequences. Therefore we have undertaken a systematic bioinformatics study of proline residues in proteins. We analyzed the distribution and frequency of 687,434 proline residues among 18,666 human proteins, identifying single residues, dimers, trimers, and longer repeats. Proline accounts for 6.3% of the 10,882,808 protein amino acids. Of all proline residues, 4.4% are in trimers or longer spans. We detected patterns that influence function based on proline location, spacing, and concentration. We propose a classification based on proline-rich, polyproline-rich, and proline-poor status. Whereas singlet proline residues are often found in proteins that display recurring architectural patterns, trimers or longer proline sequences tend be associated with the absence of repetitive structural motifs. Spans of 6 or more are associated with DNA/RNA processing, actin, and developmental processes. We also suggest a role for proline in Kruppel-type zinc finger protein control of DNA expression, and in the nucleation and translocation of actin by the formin complex.

    View details for DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0053785

    View details for Web of Science ID 000315210400007

    View details for PubMedID 23372670

  • Azetidine-2-carboxylic acid in the food chain Phytochemistry Rubenstein, E., McLaughlin T, Winant RC, Sanchez A, Eckart M, Krasinska KM, Chien A. 2009; 70: 32-36
  • Azetidine-2-carboxylic acid in the food chain PHYTOCHEMISTRY Rubenstein, E., McLaughlin, T., Winant, R. C., Sanchez, A., Eckart, M., Krasinska, K. M., Chien, A. 2009; 70 (1): 100-104

    Abstract

    Azetidine-2-carboxylic acid (Aze) 1 is a non-protein amino acid present in sugar beets and in table beets (Beta vulgaris). It is readily misincorporated into proteins in place of proline 2 in many species, including humans, and causes numerous toxic effects as well as congenital malformations. Its role in the pathogenesis of disease in humans has remained unexplored. Sugar beet agriculture, especially in the Northern Hemisphere, has become widespread during the past 150 years, and now accounts for nearly 30% of the world's supply of sucrose. Sugar beet byproducts are also used as a dietary supplement for livestock. Therefore, this study was undertaken as an initial survey to identify Aze-containing links in the food chain. Herein, we report the presence of Aze 1 in three sugar beet byproducts that are fed to farm animals: sugar beet molasses, shredded sugar beet pulp, and pelleted sugar beet pulp.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.phytochem.2008.11.007

    View details for Web of Science ID 000264235800012

    View details for PubMedID 19101705

  • Misincorporation of the proline analogue azetidine-2-carboxylic acid (Aze) in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis: hypothesis J Neuropath Exp Neurol Rubenstein Edward 2008; 67 (11): 1035-1040
  • Azetidine-2-carboxylic acid in garden beets Phytochemistry Rubenstein Edward, Zhou Haihong, Krasinska Karolina, Chien Allis, Becker CH 2006; 67 (9): 898-903
  • Optical and infrared photometry of the type Ia supernovae 1991T, 1991bg, 1999ek, 2001bt, 2001cn, 2001cz, and 2002bo (vol 128, pg 3034, 2004) ASTRONOMICAL JOURNAL Krisciunas, K., Suntzeff, N. B., Phillips, M. M., Candia, P., Prieto, J. L., Antezana, R., Chassagne, R., Chen, H. W., Dickinson, M., Eisenhardt, P. R., ESPINOZA, J., Garnavich, P. M., Gonzalez, D., Harrison, T. E., Hamuy, M., Ivanov, V. D., Krzeminski, W., Kulesa, C., McCarthy, P., Moro-Martin, A., Muena, C., Noriega-Crespo, A., Persson, S. E., Pinto, P. A., Roth, M., Rubenstein, E. P., Stanford, S. A., Stringfellow, G. S., Zapata, A., Porter, A., Wischnjewsky, M. 2005; 130 (1): 350-350
  • Optical and infrared photometry of the type Ia supernovae 1991T, 1991bg, 1999ek, 2001bt, 2001cn, 2001cz, and 2002bo ASTRONOMICAL JOURNAL Krisciunas, K., Suntzeff, N. B., Phillips, M. M., Candia, P., Prieto, J. L., Antezana, R., Chassagne, R., Chen, H. W., Dickinson, M., Eisenhardt, P. R., Espinoza, J., Garnavich, P. M., Gonzalez, D., Harrison, T. E., Hamuy, M., Ivanov, V. D., Krzeminski, W., Kulesa, C., McCarthy, P., Moro-Martin, A., Muena, C., Noriega-Crespo, A., Persson, S. E., Pinto, P. A., Roth, M., Rubenstein, E. P., Stanford, S. A., Stringfellow, G. S., Zapata, A., Porter, A., Wischnjewsky, M. 2004; 128 (6): 3034-3052
  • Alzheimer's disease, normal-pressure hydrocephalus, and senescent changes in CSF circulatory physiology: a hypothesis LANCET NEUROLOGY Silverberg, G. D., Mayo, M., Saul, T., Rubenstein, E., McGuire, D. 2003; 2 (8): 506-511

    Abstract

    There is evidence that production and turnover of CSF help to clear toxic molecules such as amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta) from the interstitial-fluid space of the brain to the bloodstream. Two changes in CSF circulatory physiology have been noted as part of ageing: first, a trend towards lower CSF production, hence a decrease in CSF turnover; and second, greater resistance to CSF outflow. Our hypothesis is that, all else being equal, the initially dominant physiological change determines whether CSF circulatory failure manifests as Alzheimer's disease (AD) or as normal-pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). If CSF production failure predominates, AD develops. However, if resistance to CSF outflow predominates, NPH results. Once either disease process takes hold, the risk of the other disorder may rise. In AD, increased deposition of Abeta in the meninges leads to greater resistance to CSF outflow. In NPH, raised CSF pressure causes lower CSF production and less clearance of Abeta. The disorders may ultimately converge in vulnerable individuals, resulting in a hybrid as has been observed in several clinical series. We postulate a new nosological entity of CSF circulatory failure, with features of AD and NPH. NPH-AD may cover an important subset of patients who carry the diagnosis of either AD or NPH.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000184314700020

    View details for PubMedID 12878439

  • Methodology for clinical trials involving patients with cancer who have febrile neutropenia: Updated guidelines of the Immunocompromised Host Society/Multinational Association for Supportive Care in Cancer, with emphasis on outpatient studies CLINICAL INFECTIOUS DISEASES Feld, R., Paesmans, M., Freifeld, A. G., Klastersky, J., Pizzo, P. A., Rolston, K. V., Rubenstein, E., Talcott, J. A., Walsh, T. J. 2002; 35 (12): 1463-1468

    Abstract

    Two multinational organizations, the Immunocompromised Host Society and the Multinational Association for Supportive Care in Cancer, have produced for investigators and regulatory bodies a set of guidelines on methodology for clinical trials involving patients with febrile neutropenia. The guidelines suggest that response (i.e., success of initial empirical antibiotic therapy without any modification) be determined at 72 h and again on day 5, and the reasons for modification should be stated. Blinding and stratification are to be encouraged, as should statistical consideration of trials specifically designed for showing equivalence. Patients enrolled in outpatient studies should be selected by use of a validated risk model, and patients should be carefully monitored after discharge from the hospital. Response and safety parameters should be recorded along with readmission rates. If studies use these guidelines, comparisons between studies will be simpler and will lead to further improvements in patient therapy.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000179707200006

    View details for PubMedID 12471564

  • Downregulation of cerebrospinal fluid production in patients with chronic hydrocephalus JOURNAL OF NEUROSURGERY Silverberg, G. D., Huhn, S., Jaffe, R. A., Chang, S. D., Saul, T., Heit, G., Von Essen, A., Rubenstein, E. 2002; 97 (6): 1271-1275

    Abstract

    The goal of this study was to determine the effect of hydrocephalus on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) production rates in patients with acute and chronic hydrocephalus.The authors studied CSF production both in patients presenting with acute and chronic hydrocephalus, and patients with Parkinson disease (PD) of a similar mean age, whose CSF production was known to be normal. A modification of the Masserman method was used to measure CSF production through a ventricular catheter. The CSF production rates (means +/- standard deviations) in the three groups were then compared. The patients with PD had a mean CSF production rate of 0.42 +/- 0.13 ml/minute; this value lies within the normal range measured using this technique. Patients with acute hydrocephalus had a similar CSF production rate of 0.4 +/- 0.13 ml/minute, whereas patients with chronic hydrocephalus had a significantly decreased mean CSF production rate of 0.25 +/- 0.08 ml/minute.The authors postulate that chronic increased intracranial pressure causes downregulation of CSF production.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000179901000004

    View details for PubMedID 12507122

  • X-ray optics 'Owl' and 'Trinity' JAPANESE JOURNAL OF APPLIED PHYSICS PART 1-REGULAR PAPERS BRIEF COMMUNICATIONS & REVIEW PAPERS Ando, M., Hyodo, K., Sugiyama, H., Maksimenko, A., Pattanasiriwisawa, W., Mori, K., Roberson, J., Rubenstein, E., Tanaka, Y., Chen, J. Y., Xian, D. C., Zhang, X. W. 2002; 41 (7A): 4742-4749
  • Synchrotron radiation dichromographic imaging of the extra- and intracranial arterial circulations and choroid plexus NUCLEAR INSTRUMENTS & METHODS IN PHYSICS RESEARCH SECTION A-ACCELERATORS SPECTROMETERS DETECTORS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Rubenstein, E. 2002; 483 (3): 814-820
  • The cerebrospinal fluid production rate is reduced in dementia of the Alzheimer's type NEUROLOGY Silverberg, G. D., Heit, G., Huhn, S., Jaffe, R. A., Chang, S. D., Bronte-Stewart, H., Rubenstein, E., Possin, K., Saul, T. A. 2001; 57 (10): 1763-1766

    Abstract

    To evaluate the production rate of CSF in patients with differing disease states.The authors measured the production rate of CSF in three groups of patients: five patients with PD below age 60 (aged 51 +/- 4 years, mean +/- SD), nine with PD over age 60 (aged 69 +/- 6 years, mean +/- SD), and seven with dementia of the Alzheimer's type (AD) (aged 72 +/- 9 years, mean +/- SD). This method, based on the Masserman technique, employs ventricular rather than a lumbar access to the CSF space. Furthermore, the volume of CSF removed during the procedure is only 3 mL rather than 10 mL.These measurements indicate that the mean rate of CSF production in patients with PD under age 60 was 0.47 +/- 0.13 mL/minute, in patients with PD aged 60 or older the mean rate was 0.40 +/- 0.12 mL/minute, and in patients with AD the mean rate was 0.20 +/- 0.06 mL/minute.These results indicate that the rate of CSF production in patients with PD is normal, and that the rate of CSF production in patients with AD is markedly reduced.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000172334700006

    View details for PubMedID 11723260

  • Biologic effects of and clinical disorders caused by nonprotein amino acids MEDICINE Rubenstein, E. 2000; 79 (2): 80-89

    Abstract

    Despite the fact that nonprotein amino acids are present in many commonly eaten foods, the biologic and clinical significance of this class of molecules has been largely overlooked. This is owing in part to their relatively low concentrations and their negligible nutritive value. Many of these compounds have the ability to interfere with a wide range of fundamental biochemical processes and cause disease. It is likely that the clinical effects of the ingestion of some nonprotein amino acids are yet to be described. Serious disorders in humans have followed the ingestion of these compounds as the result of food faddism, prodded by the commercial promotion of inadequately tested products. In view of the current popularity of herbal remedies and alternative medicine, these facts serve as another reminder to health care providers and the public at large about the need for critical analysis of the alleged benefits and the risks of exotic remedies and nutritional supplements. Beyond the public health issues they raise, non-protein amino acids take on significance because their misincorporation into proteins can trigger vigorous autoimmune attacks. To what extent this mechanism is responsible for highly prevalent diseases of autoimmunity remains to be determined.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000086326400002

    View details for PubMedID 10771706

  • Extraterrestrial handedness: A reply ORIGINS OF LIFE AND EVOLUTION OF BIOSPHERES Bonner, W. A., Rubenstein, E., Brown, G. S. 1999; 29 (3): 329-332

    Abstract

    Recent investigations of stable isotope ratios of amino acids from the Murchison meteorite have shown them to be of unambiguous extraterrestrial origin, and examinations of their enantiomeric compositions, where terrestrial contamination can be excluded, have found a consistent excess of L-enantiomers. One explanation for this observation has been the asymmetric photolysis of racemic extraterrestrial amino acids by circularly polarized light (CPL) in the synchrotron radiation from orbiting electrons around the pulsar remnants of supernovae. Mason (1997) has attempted to discredit this mechanism on the grounds that circular dichroism (CD) bands for optically active molecules alternate in sign and sum to zero over the entire spectrum, and hence enantioselective photochemical reactions cannot be induced by broad band CPL. We submit arguments disputing this conclusion and present reasons for expecting that broad band CPL synchrotron radiation would be quite capable of inducing asymmetric photolysis, particularly in aliphatic amino acids.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000080709700008

    View details for PubMedID 10465720

  • The extraterrestrial origin of the homochirality of biomolecules - Rebuttal to a critique ORIGINS OF LIFE AND EVOLUTION OF BIOSPHERES Bonner, W. A., Greenberg, J. M., Rubenstein, E. 1999; 29 (2): 215-219

    Abstract

    Having concluded that abiotic terrestrial mechanisms would have been ineffectual for the origin of terrestrial homochirality, we have proposed an alternative extraterrestrial scenario involving stereoselective ultraviolet photolysis of the racemic constituents of interstellar grain mantles by circularly polarized synchrotron radiation from neutron stars, followed by terrestrial accretion of the resulting chiral molecules via cometary impact. Recently L. Keszthelyi (1995) has reviewed a number of our arguments and advanced several erroneous calculations and conclusions purporting to negate them. We offer here points of rebuttal to Keszthelyi's criticisms, and support our inferences with recent data regarding indigenous enantiomeric excesses of L-amino acids in the Murchison meteorite.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000079739500008

    View details for PubMedID 10391773

  • Bronchial imaging in humans using xenon K-edge dichromography NUCLEAR INSTRUMENTS & METHODS IN PHYSICS RESEARCH SECTION A-ACCELERATORS SPECTROMETERS DETECTORS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Giacomini, J. C., Gordon, H., O'Neil, R., Van Kessel, A., Cason, B., Chapman, D., Lavendar, W., Gmur, N., Menk, R., Thomlinson, W., Zhong, Z., Rubenstein, E. 1998; 406 (3): 473-478
  • Relationship of senescence of cerebrospinal fluid circulatory system to dementias of the aged LANCET Rubenstein, E. 1998; 351 (9098): 283-285

    Abstract

    In common with other organ systems, the cerebrospinal fluid circulatory system is subject to senescence. Cerebrospinal fluid production and turnover rates decline. The choroid plexus calcifies and its blood supply falters. Microvascular disease violates the integrity of the blood-brain barrier. The arachnoid membranes thicken. Arachnoid villi occlude and degenerate. The consequent functional losses are exacerbated by the deterioration of other interacting organ systems. Eventually, the cerebrospinal fluid circulatory system may fail, resulting in stagnation, contamination, compositional deficiencies, and impaired clearance of noxious substances. The hypothesis is that senescence of the cerebrospinal fluid circulatory system plays a part in some dementias of the aged.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000071702200044

    View details for PubMedID 9457114

  • The concept of spatial frequency depending DQE and its application to a comparison of two detectors used in transvenous coronary angiography NUCLEAR INSTRUMENTS & METHODS IN PHYSICS RESEARCH SECTION A-ACCELERATORS SPECTROMETERS DETECTORS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Menk, R. H., Thomlinson, W., Gmur, N., Zhong, Z., Chapman, D., Arfelli, F., Dix, W. R., Graeff, W., Lohmann, M., Illing, G., Schildwachter, L., Reime, B., Kupper, W., Hamm, C., Giacomini, J. C., GORDON, H. J., Rubenstein, E., Dervan, J., Besch, H. J., Walenta, A. H. 1997; 398 (2-3): 351-367
  • XENON K-EDGE DICHROMOGRAPHIC BRONCHOGRAPHY - SYNCHROTRON-RADIATION BASED MEDICAL IMAGING NUCLEAR INSTRUMENTS & METHODS IN PHYSICS RESEARCH SECTION A-ACCELERATORS SPECTROMETERS DETECTORS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Rubenstein, E., Giacomini, J. C., GORDON, H. J., RUBENSTEIN, J. A., Brown, G. 1995; 364 (2): 360-361
  • CORONARY ANGIOGRAPHY USING SYNCHROTRON RADIATION REVIEW OF SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENTS Thompson, A. C., Rubenstein, E., Zeman, H. D., Hofstadter, R., Otis, J. N., Giacomini, J. C., GORDON, H. J., Brown, G. S., Thomlinson, W., Kernoff, R. S. 1989; 60 (7): 1674-1679
  • Stages of evolution and their messengers. Scientific American Rubenstein, E. 1989; 260 (6): 132-?

    View details for PubMedID 2727657

  • IMAGING OF CORONARY-ARTERIES USING SYNCHROTRON RADIATION NUCLEAR INSTRUMENTS & METHODS IN PHYSICS RESEARCH SECTION B-BEAM INTERACTIONS WITH MATERIALS AND ATOMS Thompson, A. C., Zeman, H., Thomlinson, W., Rubenstein, E., Kernoff, R. S., Hofstadter, R., Giacomini, J. C., GORDON, H. J., Brown, G. S. 1989; 40-1: 407-412
  • TRANSVENOUS CORONARY ANGIOGRAPHY USING SYNCHROTRON RADIATION NUCLEAR INSTRUMENTS & METHODS IN PHYSICS RESEARCH SECTION A-ACCELERATORS SPECTROMETERS DETECTORS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Thompson, A. C., Hofstadter, R., Otis, J. N., Zeman, H. D., Kernoff, R. S., Rubenstein, E., Giacomini, J. C., GORDON, H. J., Brown, G. S., Thomlinson, W. 1988; 266 (1-3): 252-259
  • PROGRESS REPORT ON SYNCHROTRON RADIATION ANGIOGRAPHY ON HUMAN-SUBJECTS JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Rubenstein, E., Brown, G. S., Giacomini, J. C., GORDON, H. J., Hofstadter, R., Kernoff, R. S., Otis, J. N., Thomlinson, W., Thompson, A. C., Zeman, H. D. 1987; 48 (C-9): 5-8
  • ANGIOGRAPHY BY SYNCHROTRON RADIATION PHYSICA SCRIPTA Rubenstein, E., Brown, G. S., Giacomini, J. C., GORDON, H. J., Hofstadter, R., Kernoff, R. S., Otis, J. N., Thomlinson, W., Thompson, A. C., Zeman, H. D. 1987; T19B: 487-490
  • SUPERNOVAE, NEUTRON-STARS AND BIOMOLECULAR CHIRALITY BIOSYSTEMS Bonner, W. A., Rubenstein, E. 1987; 20 (1): 99-111

    Abstract

    Recent theoretical and experimental investigations of the origin of biomolecular chirality are reviewed briefly. Biotic and abiotic theories are evaluated critically with the conclusion that asymmetric photochemical processes with circulary polarized light (CPL), particularly asymmetric photolyses, constitute the most viable mechanisms. Solar CPL sources appear too weak and random to be effective. We suggest an alternative CPL source, namely, the synchrotron radiation from the neutron star remnants of supernova explosions. This could asymmetrically process racemic compounds in the organic mantles of the dust grains in interstellar clouds, and the resulting chiral molecules could be transferred to Earth by cold accretion as the solar system periodically traverses these interstellar clouds.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1987G928000013

    View details for PubMedID 3580540

  • SYNCHROTRON RADIATION FOR ANGIOGRAPHY ANNUAL REVIEW OF BIOPHYSICS AND BIOPHYSICAL CHEMISTRY Rubenstein, E. 1987; 16: 161-174

    Abstract

    The intensity, monochromaticity, and tunability of synchrotron radiation make it well suited for transvenous coronary angiography. An X-ray imaging system based on synchrotron radiation has provided images of the coronary circulation in dogs and in human subjects.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1987H670800008

    View details for PubMedID 3593504

  • TRANSVENOUS CORONARY ANGIOGRAPHY IN HUMANS USING SYNCHROTRON RADIATION PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Rubenstein, E., Hofstadter, R., Zeman, H. D., Thompson, A. C., Otis, J. N., Brown, G. S., Giacomini, J. C., GORDON, H. J., Kernoff, R. S., HARRISON, D. C., Thomlinson, W. 1986; 83 (24): 9724-9728

    Abstract

    The risks and costs of the present method of visualizing the coronary arteries have limited the use of coronary angiography in long-term serial studies needed to establish the natural history of coronary atherosclerosis and its response to interventions. A less invasive method, in which the contrast agent is administered intravenously, has been developed using synchrotron radiation as the illuminating source. The present report describes the initial results in human subjects. The findings indicate that transvenous coronary angiograms can be acquired in this manner. Further refinements in the x-ray imaging system are expected to result in increased x-ray fluence and improved image quality.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1986F500600094

    View details for PubMedID 3467334

  • THE ANGIOGRAPHY PROGRAM AT STANFORD NUCLEAR INSTRUMENTS & METHODS IN PHYSICS RESEARCH SECTION A-ACCELERATORS SPECTROMETERS DETECTORS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Hughes, E. B., Rubenstein, E., Zeman, H. D., Brown, G. S., Buchbinder, M., HARRISON, D. C., Hofstadter, R., Kernoff, R. S., Otis, J. N., Thompson, A. C. 1986; 246 (1-3): 719-725
  • PROSPECTS FOR NON-INVASIVE ANGIOGRAPHY WITH TUNABLE X-RAYS NUCLEAR INSTRUMENTS & METHODS IN PHYSICS RESEARCH SECTION B-BEAM INTERACTIONS WITH MATERIALS AND ATOMS Hughes, E. B., Rubenstein, E., Zeman, H. D., Brown, G. S., Buchbinder, M., HARRISON, D. C., Hofstadter, R., Kernoff, R. S., Otis, J. N., Sommer, H. A., Thompson, A. C., Walton, J. T. 1985; 10-1 (MAY): 323-328
  • EVALUATION OF SYNCHROTRON X-RAYS FOR DIGITAL SUBTRACTION CORONARY ANGIOGRAPHY IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NUCLEAR SCIENCE Otis, J. N., Zeman, H. D., Hughes, E. B., FINMAN, L. C., Hofstadter, R., Hudson, A., Rolfe, J., Rubenstein, E., HARRISON, D. C., Kernoff, R. S., Thompson, A. C., Brown, G. S. 1984; 31 (1): 581-584
  • MEDICAL IMAGING WITH SYNCHROTRON RADIATION NUCLEAR INSTRUMENTS & METHODS IN PHYSICS RESEARCH SECTION A-ACCELERATORS SPECTROMETERS DETECTORS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Rubenstein, E. 1984; 222 (1-2): 302-307
  • EVALUATION OF SYNCHROTRON X-RAYS FOR TRANSVENOUS CORONARY ANGIOGRAPHY NUCLEAR INSTRUMENTS & METHODS IN PHYSICS RESEARCH SECTION A-ACCELERATORS SPECTROMETERS DETECTORS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Zeman, H. D., Hughes, E. B., FINMAN, L. C., Hofstadter, R., Hudson, A., Otis, J. N., Rolfe, J., Rubenstein, E., HARRISON, D. C., Kernoff, R. S., Thompson, A. C., Brown, G. S. 1984; 222 (1-2): 308-318
  • SUPER-NOVAE AND LIFE NATURE Rubenstein, E., Bonner, W. A., Noyes, H. P., Brown, G. S. 1983; 306 (5939): 118-118
  • THE APPLICATION OF SYNCHROTRON RADIATION TO NON-INVASIVE ANGIOGRAPHY NUCLEAR INSTRUMENTS & METHODS IN PHYSICS RESEARCH Hughes, E. B., Zeman, H. D., Campbell, L. E., Hofstadter, R., MEYERBERKHOUT, U., Otis, J. N., Rolfe, J., Stone, J. P., Wilson, S., Rubenstein, E., HARRISON, D. C., Kernoff, R. S., Thompson, A. C., Brown, G. S. 1983; 208 (1-3): 665-675
  • IMPLEMENTATION OF DIGITAL SUBTRACTION ANGIOGRAPHY WITH A SYNCHROTRON X-RAY-BEAM IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NUCLEAR SCIENCE Zeman, H. D., Hughes, E. B., Campbell, L. E., Hofstadter, R., Kirk, R. L., Krolicki, T. J., Rolfe, J., Stone, J. P., Wilson, S., Rubenstein, E., Thompson, A. C., Walton, J. T. 1982; 29 (1): 442-446
  • SYNCHROTRON RADIATION AND ITS APPLICATION TO DIGITAL SUBTRACTION ANGIOGRAPHY PROCEEDINGS OF THE SOCIETY OF PHOTO-OPTICAL INSTRUMENTATION ENGINEERS Rubenstein, E., Hughes, E. B., Campbell, L. E., Hofstadter, R., Kirk, R. L., Krolicki, T. J., Stone, J. P., Wilson, S., Zeman, H. D., Brody, W. R., Macovski, A., Thompson, A. C. 1981; 314: 42-49
  • DISEASES CAUSED BY IMPAIRED COMMUNICATION AMONG CELLS SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN Rubenstein, E. 1980; 242 (3): 102-?

    View details for Web of Science ID A1980JF37200005

    View details for PubMedID 6987733

  • USE OF PLATELET-FIBRINOGEN-THROMBIN MIXTURE TO SEAL EXPERIMENTAL PENETRATING CORNEAL WOUNDS ALBRECHT VON GRAEFES ARCHIV FUR KLINISCHE UND EXPERIMENTELLE OPHTHALMOLOGIE Rosenthal, A. R., Egbert, P. R., HARBURY, C., Hopkins, J. L., Rubenstein, E. 1978; 207 (2): 111-115

    Abstract

    A platelet-fibrinogen-thrombin mixture utilizing autologous platelets was studied for its potential to seal perforating corneal wounds. In rabbits, the mixture demonstrated sufficient adhesive properties to permit 75% of penetrating keratoplasties to remain in place without the use of sutures. All 12 grafts held initially; after 48 h three grafts extruded. In control eyes only two out of 12 (16%) of the corneal grafts remained in place. The material is simple to prepare and apply and is not toxic to the cornea. It does not cause inflammation or lid irritation. Intraocular complications observed with its use were transient anterior synechiae and retrocorneal membrane formation.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1978FJ82400006

    View details for PubMedID 308778

  • PHYSIOLOGICAL SEALANT FOR CEREBROSPINAL-FLUID LEAKS JOURNAL OF NEUROSURGERY Silverberg, G. D., HARBURY, C. B., Rubenstein, E. 1977; 46 (2): 215-219

    Abstract

    A combination of concentrated platelets, thrombin, and fibronogen was used to adhere a pericranial graft to surgically produced cerebrospinal fuild (CSF) fistulas in dogs. This sealant successfully stopped leakage of CSF in all fistulas produced in both acute and chronic preparations. All control animals leaked CSF acutely. In chronic control animals the CSF leaks sealed spontaneously but the grafts were not well incorporated. Histoligical examination of the grafts and underlying brain showed not injury to the brain of meningeal vessel from exposure to the platelet glue. Good fibrous union of the grafts to the dura was confirmed.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1977CT43800009

    View details for PubMedID 833638

  • MICROVASCULAR ANASTOMOSIS USING A BLOOD PRODUCT SEALANT-ADHESIVE SURGERY GYNECOLOGY & OBSTETRICS Pearl, R. M., WUSTRACK, K. O., HARBURY, C., Rubenstein, E., Kaplan, E. N. 1977; 144 (2): 227-231

    Abstract

    In this experimental model, we have shown that a four suture repair with a biologic sealant adhesive significantly reduces hemorrhage and reduces operative time, while allowing a flap survival comparable to that obtained with standard techniques in rats undergoing a microvascular anastomosis. In heparinized rats undergoing the same procedure, the sealant adhesive significantly decreases hemorrhage and increases flap survival. Of significance is the fact that the platelet-fibrinogen-thrombin adhesive is biodegradable and does not induce a tissue reaction. We believe that this physiologic adhesive may become a useful adjunct in digital reimplantation. It appears to reduce operative time and heparin-induced bleeding.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1977CU49300013

    View details for PubMedID 319545

  • Continuing medical education at Stanford: the back-to-medical-school program. Journal of medical education Rubenstein, E. 1973; 48 (10): 911-918

    View details for PubMedID 4728310

  • HEPATITIS ASSOCIATED WITH ILLICIT USE OF INTRAVENOUS METHAMPHETAMINE PUBLIC HEALTH REPORTS Davis, L. E., KALOUSEK, G., Rubenstein, E. 1970; 85 (9): 809-813

    View details for Web of Science ID A1970Y360500008

    View details for PubMedID 4989475

  • Pseudo-pseudohypoparathyroidism with dense calcification of the aorta. Report of a case. Stanford medical bulletin Rubenstein, E., Cody, R. 1959; 17: 171-174

    View details for PubMedID 14439857

Conference Proceedings


  • Clinical step onward with X-ray dark-field imaging and perspective view of medical applications of synchrotron radiation in Japan Ando, M., Hashimoto, E., Hashizume, H., Hyodo, K., Inoue, H., Kunisada, T., Maksimenko, A., Mori, K., Rubenstein, E., Roberson, J., Shimao, D., Sugiyama, H., Takeda, K., Toyofuku, F., Ueno, E., Umetani, K., Wada, H., Pattanasiriwisawa, W. ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV. 2005: 1-16
  • X-ray dark-field imaging and its application to medicine Ando, M., Sugiyama, H., Maksimenko, A., Rubenstein, E., Roberson, J., Shimao, D., Hashimoto, E., Mori, K. PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD. 2004: 899-904
  • EFFECTS OF SPATIAL-RESOLUTION AND SPECTRAL PURITY ON TRANSVENOUS CORONARY ANGIOGRAPHY IMAGES Chapman, D., Thomlinson, W. C., GMUR, N. F., Dervan, J. P., STAVOLA, T., Giacomini, J., Gordon, H., Rubenstein, E., LAVENDER, W., Schulze, C., Thompson, A. C. AMER INST PHYSICS. 1995: 1329-1331
  • A 1200 ELEMENT DETECTOR SYSTEM FOR SYNCHROTRON-BASED CORONARY ANGIOGRAPHY Thompson, A. C., LAVENDER, W. M., Chapman, D., Gmur, N., Thomlinson, W., Rosso, V., Schulze, C., Rubenstein, E., Giacomini, J. C., GORDON, H. J., Dervan, J. P. ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV. 1994: 545-552
  • SYNCHROTRON-RADIATION CORONARY ANGIOGRAPHY IN HUMANS Rubenstein, E., Brown, G. S., Chapman, D., GARRETT, R. F., Giacomini, J. C., Gmur, N., GORDON, H. J., LAVENDER, W. M., Morrison, J., Thomlinson, W., Thompson, A. C., Zeman, H. OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS. 1994: 639-645
  • 1ST OPERATION OF THE MEDICAL-RESEARCH FACILITY AT THE NSLS FOR CORONARY ANGIOGRAPHY Thomlinson, W., Gmur, N., Chapman, D., Garrett, R., LAZARZ, N., Moulin, H., Thompson, A. C., Zeman, H. D., Brown, G. S., Morrison, J., Reiser, P., PADMANABAHN, V., Ong, L., Green, S., Giacomini, J., Gordon, H., Rubenstein, E. AMER INST PHYSICS. 1992: 625-628
  • SYNCHROTRON RADIATION CORONARY ANGIOGRAPHY WITH A DUAL-BEAM, DUAL-DETECTOR IMAGING-SYSTEM Rubenstein, E., Giacomini, J. C., GORDON, H. J., Thompson, A. C., Brown, G., Hofstadter, R., Thomlinson, W., Zeman, H. D. ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV. 1990: 80-85

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