School of Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 47 Results

  • Russ B. Altman

    Russ B. Altman

    Kenneth Fong Professor and Professor of Bioengineering, of Genetics, of Medicine (General Medical Discipline) and, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I refer you to my web page for detailed list of interests, projects and publications. In addition to pressing the link here, you can search "Russ Altman" on http://www.google.com/

  • Euan A. Ashley

    Euan A. Ashley

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular), of Genetics and, by courtesy, of Pathology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Ashley lab is focused on the application of genomics to medicine. We develop methods for the interpretation of whole genome sequencing data to improve diagnosis of genetic disease and to personalize the practice of medicine. We also use network approaches to characterize biology. The wet bench is where we take advantage of cell systems, transgenic models and microsurgical models of disease to prove causality of our favorite targets.

  • Laura Attardi

    Laura Attardi

    Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Biology) and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research is aimed at defining the pathways of p53-mediated apoptosis and tumor suppression, using a combination of biochemical, cell biological, and mouse genetic approaches. Our strategy is to start by generating hypotheses about p53 mechanisms of action using primary mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs), and then to test them using gene targeting technology in the mouse.

  • Julie Baker

    Julie Baker

    Associate Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory is focused on identifying proteins based upon their ability to alter a variety of cell fate decisions - including mesodermal, endodermal, neural, endothelial, and somitic - within the vertebrate embryo.

  • Maria Barna

    Maria Barna

    Assistant Professor of Genetics and of Developmental Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory investigates how complex, elaborately patterned tissues form during vertebrate embryonic development. In particular we aim to add a new dimension to our understanding of how cells “know” where to go, when to move, and differentiate. We combine classical embryology with state-of-the-art biochemistry, imaging, and genomics. Major research areas include delineating the translational regulatory code of the mammalian genome and cutting-edge imaging of tissue patterning.

  • Greg Barsh

    Greg Barsh

    Professor of Genetics and of Pediatrics, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Genetics of color variation

  • Michael Bassik

    Michael Bassik

    Assistant Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We are interested in the mechanism by which bacterial toxins, viruses, and protein aggregates hijack the secretory pathway and kill cells. More broadly, we investigate how diverse stresses (biological, chemical) signal to the apoptotic machinery.

    To pursue these interests, we develop widely applicable new technologies to screen and measure genetic interactions; these include high-complexity shRNA libraries, which have allowed the first systematic genetic interaction maps in mammalian cells.

  • Michel Brahic

    Michel Brahic

    Consulting Professor, Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The lesions of Parkinson's disease (PD) spread within the central nervous system (CNS) with characteristics of prion diseases. The prion in this case is a misfolded form of alpha-synuclein. We are investigating the mechanism of spread on alpha-synuclein prions with a special attention to axonal transport and transfer of prions between neurons. Understanding these pathways could lead to using drugs to slow down or halt disease progression.

  • Anne Brunet

    Anne Brunet

    Associate Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our lab studies the molecular basis of longevity. We are interested in the mechanism of action of known longevity genes, including FOXO and SIRT, in the mammalian nervous system. We are particularly interested in the role of these longevity genes in neural stem cells. We are also discovering novel genes and processes involved in aging using two short-lived model systems, the invertebrate C. elegans and an extremely short-lived vertebrate, the African killifish N. furzeri.

  • Carlos Bustamante

    Carlos Bustamante

    Professor of Genetics and, by courtesy, of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research focuses on analyzing genome wide patterns of variation within and between species to address fundamental questions in biology, anthropology, and medicine. My group works on a variety of organisms and model systems ranging from humans and other primates to domesticated plant and animals. Much of our research is at the interface of computational biology, mathematical genetics, and evolutionary genomics.

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