Bio

Clinical Focus


  • Interstitial Lung Diseases
  • Heart-lung and Lung Transplant
  • Pulmonary Disease
  • Critical Care Medicine

Academic Appointments


Professional Education


  • Board Certification: Critical Care Medicine, American Board of Internal Medicine (2007)
  • Residency:Monmouth Medical Center (2004) NJ
  • Internship:Monmouth Medical Center (2002) NJ
  • Fellowship:Stanford University Medical Center (2009) CA
  • Fellowship:University of Vermont Medical Center (2007) VT
  • Board Certification: Pulmonary Disease, American Board of Internal Medicine (2006)
  • Board Certification: Internal Medicine, American Board of Internal Medicine (2004)
  • Medical Education:Medical Academy of Lublin (1997)

Publications

All Publications


  • Noninvasive monitoring of infection and rejection after lung transplantation. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America De Vlaminck, I., Martin, L., Kertesz, M., Patel, K., Kowarsky, M., Strehl, C., Cohen, G., Luikart, H., Neff, N. F., Okamoto, J., Nicolls, M. R., Cornfield, D., Weill, D., Valantine, H., Khush, K. K., Quake, S. R. 2015; 112 (43): 13336-13341

    Abstract

    The survival rate following lung transplantation is among the lowest of all solid-organ transplants, and current diagnostic tests often fail to distinguish between infection and rejection, the two primary posttransplant clinical complications. We describe a diagnostic assay that simultaneously monitors for rejection and infection in lung transplant recipients by sequencing of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) in plasma. We determined that the levels of donor-derived cfDNA directly correlate with the results of invasive tests of rejection (area under the curve 0.9). We also analyzed the nonhuman cfDNA as a hypothesis-free approach to test for infections. Cytomegalovirus is most frequently assayed clinically, and the levels of CMV-derived sequences in cfDNA are consistent with clinical results. We furthermore show that hypothesis-free monitoring for pathogens using cfDNA reveals undiagnosed cases of infection, and that certain infectious pathogens such as human herpesvirus (HHV) 6, HHV-7, and adenovirus, which are not often tested clinically, occur with high frequency in this cohort.

    View details for DOI 10.1073/pnas.1517494112

    View details for PubMedID 26460048

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