Bio

Bio


Dr. Hennessey is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Anesthesia and Critical Care Medicine. She earned her undergraduate degree in Neuroscience at Vanderbilt University and her medical degree at Saint Louis University. Following an internship at St. John’s Mercy Medical Center in St. Louis, she completed her anesthesia and critical care training at Stanford University. Dr. Hennessey is board certified in Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine. She joined the faculty at Stanford in 2012 and performs clinical duties on the following services: general anesthesia, anesthesia preoperative care clinic, cardiothoracic intensive care unit, and medical-surgical intensive care unit. Clinical areas of study include early mobility and delirium management of critically ill patients as well as patient-family interaction in the ICU. She currently serves as the Program Director of the Anesthesia Critical Care Medicine Fellowship and as the Rotation Director for the Critical Care Core Clerkship at Stanford School of Medicine. Her medical education interests include simulation, flipped-classroom models, quality-improvement training for trainees, methods of assessment, and patient-doctor communication skills.

Clinical Focus


  • Critical Care
  • Anesthesia
  • Anesthesia Preoperative Evaluation
  • Medical Education
  • Patient Simulation

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Co-Medical Director of Stanford LifeFlight, Stanford Hospital and Clinics (2012 - 2014)
  • Associate Program Director, Anesthesia Critical Care Fellowship, Stanford University (2013 - 2015)
  • Program Director, Anesthesia Critical Care Fellowship, Stanford Medicine (2015 - Present)
  • Rotation Director, Critical Care Core Clerkship, Stanford University School of Medicine (2015 - Present)

Honors & Awards


  • John Thompson, M.D. Memorial Critical Care Medicine Fellowship Award - Teaching Award, Stanford University (2012)

Professional Education


  • Fellowship:Stanford Medicine Pulmonary and Critical Care Fellowship (2012) CA
  • Board Certification: Critical Care Medicine, American Board of Anesthesiology (2012)
  • Board Certification: Anesthesia, American Board of Anesthesiology (2012)
  • Residency:Stanford University (2011) CA
  • Internship:St John'S Mercy Med Ctr - Mo (2008) MO
  • Medical Education:Saint Louis University School of Medicine (2007) MO

Community and International Work


  • IndoAnesthesia Conference, Jakarta, Indonesia

    Topic

    US Guided Techniques in Anesthesia and Obstetric Critical Care

    Populations Served

    Local Anesthesiologists in Indonesia

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    Yes

  • Medical Mission, Cumana, Venezuela

    Topic

    Anesthesia for Cleft Lip and Palate

    Partnering Organization(s)

    RotaPlast

    Populations Served

    Children and adults with facial deformities requiring surgical repair

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    No

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    Yes

Teaching

Graduate and Fellowship Programs


  • Critical Care Medicine (Fellowship Program)

Publications

All Publications


  • Needle-guided ultrasound technique for axillary artery catheter placement in critically ill patients: A case series and technique description. Journal of critical care Htet, N., Vaughn, J., Adigopula, S., Hennessey, E., Mihm, F. 2017; 41: 194-197

    Abstract

    Axillary arterial cannulation for blood pressure monitoring has been reported in adults since 1973. Reported failure rates using palpation landmarks are high. This report describes a needle-guided ultrasound technique for axillary arterial line placement in critically ill patients.A retrospective review of all patients requiring axillary arterial cannulation attempts with ultrasound-assisted needle guidance for hemodynamic monitoring was performed from July 2010 to June 2016 at a single institution.One hundred fifty nine (159) cannulation attempts were performed in 155 patients. The overall success rate was 97%, with a first pass success rate of 84%. Inexperienced operators performed 49% of procedures under direct faculty supervision, and had a 99% success rate, which was not different from experienced operators. Almost 20% of patients had moderate-to-severe coagulopathy (platelets<50k/uL, INR>2.0 or PTT>60s). Complications reported included the following: nonfunctioning of catheter (6%) and hematoma (6%). Ischemia was noted in 2 patients (1%), but only one was attributed to the arterial catheter.Use of the needle-guided ultrasound assisted approach for axillary arterial line placement is easily teachable and can be used to promote safe and successful placement of axillary arterial lines for novice learners.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jcrc.2017.05.026

    View details for PubMedID 28577475