Publications

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  • SACRAL NEUROMODULATION IN PARKINSON'S DISEASE PATIENTS WITH NEUROGENIC BLADDER Greenberg, D., Sohlberg, E., Zhang, C., Comiter, C., Enemchukwu, E. LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS. 2019: E95
  • LONG-TERM REOPERATION RATES ARE EQUIVALENT FOR PELVIC ORGAN PROLAPSE REPAIRS WITH BIOLOGIC AND SYNTHETIC GRAFTS IN A LARGE POPULATION BASED COHORT Sohlberg, E., Dallas, K., Elliott, C., Rogo-Gupta, L. LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS. 2019: E17–E18
  • THE EPIDEMIOLOGY OF URINARY STONE DISEASE IN PREGNANCY: A CLAIMS-BASED ANALYSIS OF 1.2 MILLION PATIENTS Sohlberg, E., Brubaker, W., Zhang, C., Dallas, K., Ganesan, C., Song, S., Pao, A., Liao, J., Leppert, J., Elliott, C., Conti, S. LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS. 2019: E846
  • The Harms of Overdiagnosis and Overtreatment in Patients with Small Renal Masses: A Mini-review. European urology focus Sohlberg, E. M., Metzner, T. J., Leppert, J. T. 2019

    Abstract

    Overdiagnosis and overtreatment refer to the detection and treatment of conditions that would not ultimately affect an individual's health. With increasing detection of small renal masses there is growing awareness of the overdiagnosis and overtreatment of these tumors, supported by studies showing that 15-30% of nephrectomy specimens are pathologically benign, and that many small renal cell carcinomas are indolent. The harms of overdiagnosis and overtreatment are numerous, including psychosocial stressors and renal morbidity, in addition to unnecessary surgical complications. A greater understanding of the potential harms of overdiagnosis and overtreatment is crucial as clinicians focus on optimizing patient selection for renal mass biopsy, active surveillance protocols, and minimally invasive surgery. PATIENT SUMMARY: In this mini-review we discuss the issues of overdiagnosis and overtreatment in patients with kidney cancer. We enumerate the risks of overdiagnosis and overtreatment, and examine the next steps towards preventing these harms.

    View details for PubMedID 30905599

  • Burch Colposuspension UROLOGIC CLINICS OF NORTH AMERICA Sohlberg, E. M., Elliott, C. S. 2019; 46 (1): 53-+
  • Sacral neuromodulation in Parkinson's disease patients with neurogenic bladder Greenberg, D., Sohlberg, E., Zhang, C., Comiter, C. V., Enemchukwu, E. WILEY. 2019: S158–S159
  • Long-term reoperation rates are equivalent for pelvic organ prolapse repairs with biologic and synthetic grafts in a large population based cohort Dallas, K. B., Sohlberg, E., Elliott, C. S., Rogo-Gupta, L. WILEY. 2019: S228–S229
  • Burch Colposuspension. The Urologic clinics of North America Sohlberg, E. M., Elliott, C. S. 2019; 46 (1): 53–59

    Abstract

    The Burch colposuspension has a 50-plus year history demonstrating strong long-term outcomes with minimal complications. Iterations of the procedure, including laparoscopic, robotic, and mini-incisional approaches, appear to have equal efficacy to the open procedure. Although the current use of the Burch colposuspension has waned with the growing shift toward sling surgery, it continues to have a role in the treatment of stress urinary incontinence. Specifically, a Burch procedure should be considered when vaginal access is limited, concurrent intra-abdominal surgery is planned, or mesh is contraindicated.

    View details for PubMedID 30466702

  • Reoperation rates for pelvic organ prolapse repairs with biologic and synthetic grafts in a large population-based cohort. International urogynecology journal Sohlberg, E. M., Dallas, K. B., Weeks, B. T., Elliott, C. S., Rogo-Gupta, L. 2019

    Abstract

    As the long-term complications of synthetic mesh become increasingly apparent, re-evaluation of alternative graft options for pelvic organ prolapse (POP) repairs is critical. We sought to compare the long-term reoperation rates of biologic and synthetic grafts in POP repair.Using the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development database, we identified all women who underwent index inpatient POP repair with either a synthetic or biologic graft between 2005 and 2011 in the state of California. ICD-9 and CPT codes were used to identify subsequent surgeries in these patients for either recurrent POP or a graft complication.A total of 14,192 women underwent POP repair with a biologic (14%) or synthetic graft (86%) during the study period. Women with biologic grafts had increased rates of surgery for recurrent pelvic organ prolapse (3.6% vs 2.5%, p = 0.01), whereas women with synthetic grafts had higher rates of repeat surgery for a graft complication (3.0 vs 2.0%, p = 0.02). There were no significant differences between the overall risk of repeat surgery between the groups (5.7% vs 5.6%, p = 0.79). These effects persisted in multivariate modeling.We demonstrate in a large population-based cohort that biologic grafts are associated with an increased rate of repeat surgery for POP recurrence whereas synthetic mesh is associated with an increased rate of repeat surgery for a graft complication. These competing risks result in an equivalent overall any-cause repeat surgery rate between the groups. These data suggest that neither type of graft should be excluded from use and encourage a personalized risk assessment.

    View details for DOI 10.1007/s00192-019-04035-3

    View details for PubMedID 31312846

  • Prevalence of twenty-four hour urine testing in Veterans with urinary stone disease. PloS one Ganesan, C., Thomas, I. C., Song, S., Sun, A. J., Sohlberg, E. M., Kurella Tamura, M., Chertow, G. M., Liao, J. C., Conti, S., Elliott, C. S., Leppert, J. T., Pao, A. C. 2019; 14 (8): e0220768

    Abstract

    The American Urological Association guidelines recommend 24-hour urine testing in patients with urinary stone disease to decrease the risk of stone recurrence; however, national practice patterns for 24-hour urine testing are not well characterized. Our objective is to determine the prevalence of 24-hour urine testing in patients with urinary stone disease in the Veterans Health Administration and examine patient-specific and facility-level factors associated with 24-hour urine testing. Identifying variations in clinical practice can inform future quality improvement efforts in the management of urinary stone disease in integrated healthcare systems.We accessed national Veterans Health Administration data through the Corporate Data Warehouse (CDW), hosted by the Veterans Affairs Informatics and Computing Infrastructure (VINCI), to identify patients with urinary stone disease. We defined stone formers as Veterans with one inpatient ICD-9 code for kidney or ureteral stones, two or more outpatient ICD-9 codes for kidney or ureteral stones, or one or more CPT codes for kidney or ureteral stone procedures from 2007 through 2013. We defined a 24-hour urine test as a 24-hour collection for calcium, oxalate, citrate or sulfate. We used multivariable regression to assess demographic, geographic, and selected clinical factors associated with 24-hour urine testing.We identified 130,489 Veterans with urinary stone disease; 19,288 (14.8%) underwent 24-hour urine testing. Patients who completed 24-hour urine testing were younger, had fewer comorbidities, and were more likely to be White. Utilization of 24-hour urine testing varied widely by geography and facility, the latter ranging from 1 to 40%.Fewer than one in six patients with urinary stone disease complete 24-hour urine testing in the Veterans Health Administration. In addition, utilization of 24-hour urine testing varies widely by facility identifying a target area for improvement in the care of patients with urinary stone disease. Future efforts to increase utilization of 24-hour urine testing and improve clinician awareness of targeted approaches to stone prevention may be warranted to reduce the morbidity and cost of urinary stone disease.

    View details for DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0220768

    View details for PubMedID 31393935

  • Twenty-Four Hour Urine Testing and Prescriptions for Urinary Stone Disease-Related Medications in Veterans. Clinical journal of the American Society of Nephrology : CJASN Song, S., Thomas, I. C., Ganesan, C., Sohlberg, E. M., Chertow, G. M., Liao, J. C., Conti, S., Elliott, C. S., Pao, A. C., Leppert, J. T. 2019

    Abstract

    Current guidelines recommend 24-hour urine testing in the evaluation and treatment of persons with high-risk urinary stone disease. However, how much clinicians use information from 24-hour urine testing to guide secondary prevention strategies is unknown. We sought to determine the degree to which clinicians initiate or continue stone disease-related medications in response to 24-hour urine testing.We examined a national cohort of 130,489 patients with incident urinary stone disease in the Veterans Health Administration between 2007 and 2013 to determine whether prescription patterns for thiazide diuretics, alkali therapy, and allopurinol changed in response to 24-hour urine testing.Stone formers who completed 24-hour urine testing (n=17,303; 13%) were significantly more likely to be prescribed thiazide diuretics, alkali therapy, and allopurinol compared with those who did not complete a 24-hour urine test (n=113,186; 87%). Prescription of thiazide diuretics increased in patients with hypercalciuria (9% absolute increase if urine calcium 201-400 mg/d; 21% absolute increase if urine calcium >400 mg/d, P<0.001). Prescription of alkali therapy increased in patients with hypocitraturia (24% absolute increase if urine citrate 201-400 mg/d; 34% absolute increase if urine citrate ≤200 mg/d, P<0.001). Prescription of allopurinol increased in patients with hyperuricosuria (18% absolute increase if urine uric acid >800 mg/d, P<0.001). Patients who had visited both a urologist and a nephrologist within 6 months of 24-hour urine testing were more likely to have been prescribed stone-related medications than patients who visited one, the other, or neither.Clinicians adjust their treatment regimens in response to 24-hour urine testing by increasing the prescription of medications thought to reduce risk for urinary stone disease. Most patients who might benefit from targeted medications remain untreated.

    View details for DOI 10.2215/CJN.03580319

    View details for PubMedID 31712387

  • Rates and Risk Factors for Future Stress Urinary Incontinence Surgery after Pelvic Organ Prolapse Repair in a Large Population-based Cohort in California UROLOGY Syan, R., Dallas, K. B., Sohlberg, E., Rogo-Gupta, L., Elliott, C. S., Enemchukwu, E. A. 2019; 123: 81–86
  • Association Between Concomitant Hysterectomy and Repeat Surgery for Pelvic Organ Prolapse Repair in a Cohort of Nearly 100,000 Women OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY Dallas, K., Elliott, C. S., Syan, R., Sohlberg, E., Enemchukwu, E., Rogo-Gupta, L. 2018; 132 (6): 1328–36
  • Giant renal angiomyolipoma in a solitary kidney. The Canadian journal of urology Sohlberg, E., Sun, A., Massoudi, R., Prado, K., Skinner, E. 2018; 25 (6): 9614–16

    Abstract

    While renal angiomyolipomas (AMLs) generally remain small and asymptomatic, larger AMLs are more common in tuberous sclerosis patients. Giant AMLs over 20 cm are a rare entity and little is known about their management. We present a unique case of a 48-year-old woman with tuberous sclerosis and a 39 cm AML arising from a solitary kidney, after undergoing nephrectomy for a prior AML. Giant renal AMLs can occur in patients with tuberous sclerosis and resection should be considered even for large tumors. Renal sparing is often difficult and patients should be counseled about potential need for postoperative hemodialysis.

    View details for PubMedID 30553288

  • Association Between Concomitant Hysterectomy and Repeat Surgery for Pelvic Organ Prolapse Repair in a Cohort of Nearly 100,000 Women. Obstetrics and gynecology Dallas, K., Elliott, C. S., Syan, R., Sohlberg, E., Enemchukwu, E., Rogo-Gupta, L. 2018

    Abstract

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association of hysterectomy at the time of pelvic organ prolapse (POP) repair with the risk of undergoing subsequent POP surgery in a large population-based cohort.METHODS: Data from the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development were used in this retrospective cohort study to identify all women who underwent an anterior, apical, posterior or multiple compartment POP repair at nonfederal hospitals between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2011, using Current Procedural Terminology and International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision procedure codes. Women with a diagnosis code indicating prior hysterectomy were excluded, and the first prolapse surgery during the study period was considered the index repair. Demographic and surgical characteristics were explored for associations with the primary outcome of a repeat POP surgery. We compared reoperation rates for recurrent POP between patients who did compared with those who did not have a hysterectomy at the time of their index POP repair.RESULTS: Of the 93,831 women meeting inclusion criteria, 42,340 (45.1%) underwent hysterectomy with index POP repair. Forty-eight percent of index repairs involved multiple compartments, 14.0% included mesh, and 48.9% included an incontinence procedure. Mean follow-up was 1,485 days (median 1,500 days). The repeat POP surgery rate was lower in those patients in whom hysterectomy was performed at the time of index POP repair, 3.0% vs 4.4% (relative risk [RR] 0.67, 95% CI 0.62-0.71). Multivariate modeling revealed that hysterectomy was associated with a decreased risk of future surgery for anterior (odds ratio [OR] 0.71, 95% CI 0.64-0.78), apical (OR 0.76, 95% CI 0.70-0.84), and posterior (OR 0.69, 95% CI 0.65-0.75) POP recurrence. The hysterectomy group had increased lengths of hospital stay (mean 2.2 days vs 1.8 days, mean difference 0.40, 95% CI 0.38-0.43), rates of blood transfusion (2.5% vs 1.5, RR 1.62, 95% CI 1.47-1.78), rates of perioperative hemorrhage (1.5% vs 1.1%, RR 1.32, 95% CI 1.18-1.49), rates of urologic injury or fistula (0.9% vs 0.6%, RR 1.66, 95% CI 1.42-1.93), rates of infection or sepsis (0.9% vs 0.4%, RR 2.12, 95% CI 1.79-2.52), and rate of readmission for an infectious etiology (0.7% vs 0.3%, RR 2.54, 95% CI 2.08-3.10) as compared with those who did not undergo hysterectomy.CONCLUSION: We demonstrate in a large population-based cohort that hysterectomy at the time of prolapse repair is associated with a decreased risk of future POP surgery by 1-3% and is independently associated with higher perioperative morbidity. Individualized risks and benefits should be included in the discussion of POP surgery.

    View details for PubMedID 30334856

  • Rates and Risk Factors for Future Stress Urinary Incontinence Surgery After Pelvic Organ Prolapse Repair in a Large Population Based Cohort in California. Urology Syan, R., Dallas, K. B., Sohlberg, E., Rogo-Gupta, L., Elliott, C. S., Enemchukwu, E. A. 2018

    Abstract

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the rate and risk factors for future stress incontinence (SUI) surgery in a large population based cohort of previously continent women following pelvic organ prolapse (POP) repair without concomitant SUI treatment.METHODS: Data from the Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development (OSHPD) was used to identify all women who underwent anterior, apical or combined antero-apical POP repair without concomitant SUI procedures in the state of California between 2005-2011 with at least one-year follow-up. Patient and surgical characteristics were explored for associations with subsequent SUI procedures.RESULTS: Of 41,689 women undergoing anterior or apical POP surgery, 1,504 (3.6%) underwent subsequent SUI surgery with a mean follow-up time of 4.1 years. Age (OR 1.01), obesity (OR 1.98), use of mesh at the time of POP repair (OR 2.04), diabetes mellitus (OR 1.19), White race and combined antero-apical repair (OR 1.30) were associated with an increased odds of future SUI surgery.CONCLUSIONS: The rate of subsequent surgery for de novo SUI following POP repair on a population level is low. Patient and surgical characteristics may alter a woman's individual risk and should be considered in surgical planning.

    View details for PubMedID 30222995

  • CONCOMITANT HYSTERECTOMY LOWERS THE RATE OF RECURRENT PROLAPSE SURGERY FOR ALL COMPARTMENTS IN A COHORT OF OVER 100,000 WOMEN Enemchukwu, E., Dallas, K., Syan, R., Sohlberg, E., Elliott, C., Rogo-Gupta, L. WILEY. 2018: S556
  • IS PROPHYLACTIC STRESS INCONTINENCE SURGERY NECESSARY AT THE TIME OF PELVIC ORGAN PROLAPSE REPAIR? - RATES OF FUTURE SURGERY IN A LARGE POPULATION BASED COHORT IN CALIFORNIA Syan, R., Dallas, K., Sohlberg, E., Rogo-Gupta, L., Elliott, C., Enemchukwu, E. WILEY. 2018: S567
  • Tibial Nerve and Sacral Neuromodulation in the Elderly Patient Curr Bladder Dysfunct Rep Sohlberg, E., Greenberg, D., Enemchukwu, E. 2018 ; 288 (13)
  • Racial and Socioeconomic Disparities in Short-term Urethral Sling Surgical Outcomes UROLOGY Dallas, K. B., Sohlberg, E. M., Elliott, C. S., Rogo-Gupta, L., Enemchukwu, E. 2017; 110: 70–75

    Abstract

    To evaluate the association of racial and socioeconomic factors with the risk of adverse events in the first 30 days following urethral sling placement.We accessed nonpublic data from the Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development in California from 2005 to 2011. All female patients who underwent an ambulatory urethral sling procedure in the entire state of California over the study period were identified (Current Procedural Terminology 57288). Our main outcome was any unplanned hospital visits within 30 days of the patient's surgery in the form of an inpatient admission, revision surgery, or emergency department visit.A total of 28,635 women who underwent outpatient urethral sling placement were identified. Within 30 days, 1628 women (5.7%) had at least 1 unplanned hospital visit. In the adjusted multivariate model, black race and Medicaid insurance status were both independently associated with increased odds of having an unplanned hospital visit (odds ratio 1.80, P < .01 and odds ratio 1.53, P < .01, respectively). This significance persisted even when controlling for patient comorbidities, demographics, and facility characteristics.We found that, similar to what has been reported in other fields, disparities in outcomes exist between socioeconomic and racial groups in the field of urogynecology.

    View details for PubMedID 28847692